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From Hell Letter DECODED

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  • so Ill ask again-Does anyone know how easy it would have been for someone to slip this letter in? Whats the process for someone reviewing documents at the NA?

    like I mentioned-when I worked at the archive room at my colleges library we had a pretty tight process. Customers had to make an appointment, show ID, sign in, allowed into a special room, not bring any papers, parcels, notebooks, bookbags, etc into the room, wear gloves and was watched by staff. There was also (usually) a campus police officer who guarded the entrance to the room. It would have been near impossible for someone to take anything away or slip something in.

    Does anyone know the process and how secure it was? ie, how easy or difficult it would be for someone to slip this letter in??

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

      yup agree with you there. I lean toward from hell and and or dear boss being authentic. I also think the Openshaw letter, the Winters Coming letter of 1896 and this Pal Jacky letter have a chance, but lean more toward them not being real.
      Yes, in my opinion Openshaw relies heavily on From Hell, if From Hell is a hoax so is Openshaw, if From Hell is real Openshaw increases to about 70:30
      G U T

      There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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      • Originally posted by GUT View Post

        I wonder if we will ever forget Pierre?
        Who?

        Comment


        • Originally posted by GUT View Post
          I’m on the fence but believe if any letter was written by the killer it was “From Hell”
          I agree, and I believe its possible that the biological sample was Kates. I think intimidating Lusk was the goal, not taunting the Police, and that goes well with the threat he received earlier that month. Also might explain why he waited so long to tell anyone he had received the parcel...while knowing full well he had a probable piece of evidence for a murder investigation in his drawer. He waits more than 24 hours, then finally tells his committee associates, then takes it to a medical man. So, what about the police?
          Last edited by Michael W Richards; 05-02-2019, 04:51 PM.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Michael W Richards View Post

            I agree, and I believe its possible that the biological sample was Kates. I think intimidating Lusk was the goal, not taunting the Police, and that goes well with the threat he received earlier that month. Also might explain why he waited so long to tell anyone he had received the parcel...while knowing full well he had a probable piece of evidence for a murder investigation in his drawer. He waits more than 24 hours, then finally tells his committee associates, then takes it to a medical man. So, what about the police?
            I just had a crazy thought. What if lusk was the ripper? Has anyone posited that doozy before? Lol

            Comment


            • Logistically it's not that problematical, he just needs to post the parcel to himself, and get someone to request his address without being aware why he's doing it. We need to look closer at the earlier threat. It's JTR nothing is off the table.

              It seems a strange stretch for a serial killer to want to publicly paint himself as being terrified; some sort of odd Munchhausen syndrome; the need to be both predator and victim?

              Comment


              • Originally posted by rjpalmer View Post

                Cover letter/explanatory telegram from Tom Bulling or Central News?
                That’s a good suggestion.

                Does anyone know when the Central News covering letter now located in MEPO 3/3153 was filed there?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
                  so Ill ask again-Does anyone know how easy it would have been for someone to slip this letter in? Whats the process for someone reviewing documents at the NA?

                  like I mentioned-when I worked at the archive room at my colleges library we had a pretty tight process. Customers had to make an appointment, show ID, sign in, allowed into a special room, not bring any papers, parcels, notebooks, bookbags, etc into the room, wear gloves and was watched by staff. There was also (usually) a campus police officer who guarded the entrance to the room. It would have been near impossible for someone to take anything away or slip something in.

                  Does anyone know the process and how secure it was? ie, how easy or difficult it would be for someone to slip this letter in??
                  Somewhere (casebook or forums), someone (possibly Paul Begg or Stewart Evans?) stated something like in those days security protocols were more concerned with people taking documents and the poster thought that it would be quite easy to slip something into the archives.

                  Frustratingly I haven’t been able to find the post!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post

                    Assuming it's actually on the microfiche. Even if it is, we'd have to determine when the paper files were scanned onto fiche, and whether there have been any opportunities for someone to have planted the bogus letter before, or during, that time.
                    Joshua Rogan (post #68) posted this link https://www.jtrforums.com/showthread.php?t=3025&page=4

                    In post #131 Mac the Knife (apparently Paul McClelland) said he was going to check his film of the microfiche to confirm the folder was there as per his previous statements.

                    He doesn’t seem to have done that by post #191 where Chris Phillips confirmed he had spent a day checking the microfiche and that the folder is not on it.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by phantom View Post

                      Joshua Rogan (post #68) posted this link https://www.jtrforums.com/showthread.php?t=3025&page=4

                      In post #131 Mac the Knife (apparently Paul McClelland) said he was going to check his film of the microfiche to confirm the folder was there as per his previous statements.

                      He doesn’t seem to have done that by post #191 where Chris Phillips confirmed he had spent a day checking the microfiche and that the folder is not on it.
                      Thanks, Phantom.
                      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by phantom View Post

                        Somewhere (casebook or forums), someone (possibly Paul Begg or Stewart Evans?) stated something like in those days security protocols were more concerned with people taking documents and the poster thought that it would be quite easy to slip something into the archives.

                        Frustratingly I haven’t been able to find the post!
                        thanks Phantom
                        this was in 1988 correct? Ironically this was when I was working in the archive room at my college library. hard to imagine the NA would have more lax procedures than a state college in regard to viewing material.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

                          I just had a crazy thought. What if lusk was the ripper? Has anyone posited that doozy before? Lol
                          Hi Abby,

                          I may be simply imagining it but I’m sure that I’ve heard Lusk being mentioned as a possible suspect before? I could certainly be wrong though. Perhaps someone might be able to confirm or deny? We’ve had Bachert as a suspect in a book after all so why not Lusk? The Lusk character in the Michael Caine series was certainly a nasty piece of work. I wouldn’t put anything past him.
                          Regards

                          Sir Herlock Sholmes



                          “Conspiracy theorists, she knew, were paranoid by definition, and usually with good reason – they were indeed being watched, largely because they were standing on an upturned bucket, haranguing the sheeple about their wingnut delusions.”

                          “If you argue with a madman, it is extremely probable that you will get the worst of it; for in many ways his mind moves all the quicker for not being delayed by the things that go with good judgment.”

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by phantom View Post

                            Somewhere (casebook or forums), someone (possibly Paul Begg or Stewart Evans?) stated something like in those days security protocols were more concerned with people taking documents and the poster thought that it would be quite easy to slip something into the archives.

                            Frustratingly I haven’t been able to find the post!
                            I recall that discussion, as it concerned the sidebar notes on the MM.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

                              thanks Phantom
                              this was in 1988 correct? Ironically this was when I was working in the archive room at my college library. hard to imagine the NA would have more lax procedures than a state college in regard to viewing material.

                              Hi Abby,

                              It was Stewart Evans post #134 https://forum.casebook.org/forum/rip...h-letter/page9

                              Quoted below:

                              Norma, when I was doing research at the PRO in the 70s and 80s the security of the documents was not very good. And, of course, it was during these years that a lot was stolen. And, of course, the emphasis was always on theft rather than depositing anything. Hunched over the files with a page to be deposited hidden in your notepad, or inside jacket pocket, it would have been very easy at some moment, of maybe hours poring over the files, to slip in the page. I'm not just saying this for goodness sake - it would have been easily done.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by phantom View Post


                                Hi Abby,

                                It was Stewart Evans post #134 https://forum.casebook.org/forum/rip...h-letter/page9

                                Quoted below:

                                Norma, when I was doing research at the PRO in the 70s and 80s the security of the documents was not very good. And, of course, it was during these years that a lot was stolen. And, of course, the emphasis was always on theft rather than depositing anything. Hunched over the files with a page to be deposited hidden in your notepad, or inside jacket pocket, it would have been very easy at some moment, of maybe hours poring over the files, to slip in the page. I'm not just saying this for goodness sake - it would have been easily done.
                                Indeed, we were still learning about the importance of document security back then, and procedures weren't as tight as they are today. Not that even today's procedures are 100% proof against a determined fraudster.
                                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                                "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                                Comment

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