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Maybrick--a Problem in Logic

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  • two examples, 3 spelling mistakes... all leads to lexicon conversion...and if a 1600AD example...many, many yaers to convert! (let's see how long it takes for "yaers" to take of (off)

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    • I’ve always felt uncomfortable that Maybrick writes his thinking process during the composition of his poems and the poems at the same time.
      It comes across as an affectation for dramatic effect, not someone wanting to impress with his prose.
      You wouldn’t want a valentines card from Maybrick.


      Roses are red

      Bellflowers are blue

      Violets are blue.


      Think dam it!


      Violets are blue

      My last name ends with M

      curses!!


      My last name starts with M


      I shall find a word that rhymes with blue damn you!

      Do you love me too?

      Love James

      X


      Comment


      • Originally posted by Yabs View Post
        I’ve always felt uncomfortable that Maybrick writes his thinking process during the composition of his poems and the poems at the same time.
        It comes across as an affectation for dramatic effect, not someone wanting to impress with his prose.
        You wouldn’t want a valentines card from Maybrick.


        Roses are red

        Bellflowers are blue

        Violets are blue.


        Think dam it!


        Violets are blue

        My last name ends with M

        curses!!


        My last name starts with M


        I shall find a word that rhymes with blue damn you!

        Do you love me too?

        Love James

        X

        I think your incredulity is not quite enough to swing the argument against Maybrick, I'm afraid, Yabs. It's not exactly what we sometimes like to call 'evidence', in all honesty.

        Cheers,

        Ike
        Iconoclast
        Soldier of Fortune, Man of Peace, Destroyer of Images, Nice Guy, Genius

        Comment


        • Hi Icke.

          I totally agree my friend, it’s just one of the many things that I feel seem a little odd.
          Along with the diary’s constant use of the words Today, tomorrow, Yesterday, instead of naming a day or a date, the latter being the more natural thing to do.


          So yes, far from proof and I never for one moment thought of it as such.
          It’s just one of the many things that lead me to view the scrapbook with suspicion.

          All the best

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Yabs View Post
            Hi Icke.

            I totally agree my friend, it’s just one of the many things that I feel seem a little odd.
            Along with the diary’s constant use of the words Today, tomorrow, Yesterday, instead of naming a day or a date, the latter being the more natural thing to do.


            So yes, far from proof and I never for one moment thought of it as such.
            It’s just one of the many things that lead me to view the scrapbook with suspicion.

            All the best
            Personally, I can't imagine writing about yesterday, today, or tomorrow without using those rather convenient terms. When writing to myself (as Maybrick was to himself) why would I need to offer any greater precision than that? I use those words all the time in my own very occasional diary or in emails, etc.. On the other hand, when I'm referring to a date outside of that very tight window, I will happily use a date format to aid clarity for the reader who is most likely (in the case of my diary) to be myself. I cannot eek any drama or suspicion out of that rather natural and thoroughly mundane aspect of human communication.

            Could any of our readers offer an insight into the thorny problem of referring to yesterday, today, or tomorrow without using those specific terms? Clearly James Maybrick (or our erstwhile hoaxer) failed miserably and had to resort to using the most perfect words possible for each occasion (however many hours forward or backward he was reflecting upon). I'm struggling, Yabs. I need help here to understand how "I went to the pub and got totally smashed yesterday" (my diary, not James', obviously) would reveal to the reader that I didn't, but how "I went to the pub on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 and got totally smashed. By the way, that's the day that passed before the day I'm currently in." would support the notion that I had.

            I have often thought that being a Newcastle United fan made me a perfect foil for Maybrick's sentiments, incidentally. No, I'm not suggesting that we're all a bunch of secretive, murdering animals, but simply that sometimes I really do feel like burning St. James' to the ground. Ha ha.

            Ike (no 'c')
            Last edited by Iconoclast; 01-30-2020, 08:38 AM.
            Iconoclast
            Soldier of Fortune, Man of Peace, Destroyer of Images, Nice Guy, Genius

            Comment


            • Ironically Ike, your post is currently showing as being posted "today".
              However, when that is no longer the most relevant term, I'm sure Casebook will date it accordingly.
              Them's the vagaries.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Al Bundy's Eyes View Post
                Ironically Ike, your post is currently showing as being posted "today".
                However, when that is no longer the most relevant term, I'm sure Casebook will date it accordingly.
                Good point, Abe!
                Iconoclast
                Soldier of Fortune, Man of Peace, Destroyer of Images, Nice Guy, Genius

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                • Of course those are natural terms to use.

                  But to bother to write a journal of your movements and only use those terms, and not include one date or even name which day of the week it is at any point, is very odd.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Yabs View Post
                    Of course those are natural terms to use.

                    But to bother to write a journal of your movements and only use those terms, and not include one date or even name which day of the week it is at any point, is very odd.
                    Yabs, this is a 'hoaxer' who was able to spell 'sceptick' correctly in the context of 1888. He or she did the hard yards of research. I don't think he or she would have had a moment's hesitation in using some days of the weeks or actual dates, especially where these were well-established. You probably feel that I am over-reacting here, but you need to realise that we get far too much irrational (lazy?) 'reasoning' on the Casebook, and - like irrationality all the world over - it is frighteningly-compelling to those who like to repeat such stuff not long later as known facts.

                    You need to be careful how your mind moves from A to C - especially if it has to go through B and B is an unknown, unmapped town in the backwaters.

                    Cheers,

                    Ike
                    Iconoclast
                    Soldier of Fortune, Man of Peace, Destroyer of Images, Nice Guy, Genius

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