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  • Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post

    Ah, ‘Boudica’. Was that how she spelt it?
    Short for Bootie Call?
    My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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    • If you read the pamphlet issued to counter Fred McKenzie’s characterisation of Dorset Street as the ‘Worst Street in London’, you’ll see reference made to a ‘Mr J. McCarthy sen.’ The use of ‘sen’ suggests there was a similarly prominent ‘J. McCarthy jun.’, which of course there was - ‘Steve’, the entertainer.

      The two Dorset Street JMs were often mentioned in tandem as ‘sen.’ and ‘jun’. Perhaps there was another prominent JM father and son combo who supported local good causes alongside men named Crossingham, Cooney, Tempany etc.

      You never know.

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      • I’ve just started a thread over At Howard’s gaff which may complement this one:

        https://www.jtrforums.com/showthread...923#post407923

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        • Hi,
          Is there another coincidence here, The Wringers/Ringers, are from Norfolk, They had The Britannica in Dorset street The Norfolk letter sent to the police a week before Millers court, stated I shall be at work between the two piers, These are The Britannica , and The Wellington[ another Whitechapel pub,] Also Further down Dorset street the letter alleged was penned from.
          My nose is twitching,
          Regards Richard,

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          • Originally posted by richardnunweek View Post
            Hi,
            Is there another coincidence here, The Wringers/Ringers, are from Norfolk, They had The Britannica in Dorset street The Norfolk letter sent to the police a week before Millers court, stated I shall be at work between the two piers, These are The Britannica , and The Wellington[ another Whitechapel pub,] Also Further down Dorset street the letter alleged was penned from.
            My nose is twitching,
            Regards Richard,
            If you like we can ride the coincidences of the Yarmouth letter. It was reported to have said to look out for Jack the Ripper at either of the piers where he intends to do for two Norwich women before closing time. The piers at Yarmouth are known as the Britannia and the Wellington. There was a Britannia at the bottom of Dorset Street and a Duke of Wellington. The term ‘closing time’ is commonly associated with a pub. Mary Kelly was sighted at the Britannia on her last night.

            The Gehringers ran ‘The City of Norwich’ on Wentworth Street. 18 George Street may have been run by them in 1885/ 86 but Daniel Lewis was running it by 1888. Mary Kelly did live for a time in George Street. Could a ‘Norwich woman’ be a term for ‘Gehringer woman’? Had Kelly been in some sense a ‘Norwich woman’? It’s odd to point out specifically ‘Norwich’ women when supposed to be out and about in Yarmouth.

            If Mary Kelly was a ‘Norwich woman’ by virtue of having ‘worked’ for the Gehringers, then Emma Smith the first of the Whitechapel Murder victims would have been. She was resident at 18 George Street. She was attacked on/ near the street corner of Wentworth Street one block away from The City of Norwich. Martha Tabram may also have been a former ’Norwich woman’, she was also a resident of George Street. She was attacked in the alley directly in front of the City of Norwich.

            The last place Polly Nichols was seen alive was at the junction of Osborn Street and Whitechapel High Street, outside Feldman’s Post Office. Also close to the City of Norwich.

            The City of Norwich appears again in relation to Jacob Isenschmid, a suspect in the murder of Polly Nichols and Annie Chapman. His wife said he was a regular there, Mrs Gehringer when questioned denied this.

            Going back to the letter, it was unstamped. When a letter is unstamped, either the recipient agrees to pay the postage or the letter is returned to sender. The letter could have ended up delivered to 14 Dorset Street.

            The Chief Constable of Yarmouth in 1888 was William Brogdon. His son, also William Brogdon was at one time a Detective in H Division. He may have been there in 1888. The author may have known this and may have thought the message could get back to Dorset Street by that route.

            14 Dorset Street may have been intended as the recipient of letter. It may have been a threat.

            In 1898, McCarthy was described by Duckworth as controlling the area centred on Dorset Street and Gehringer controlling the area centred on Great Pearl Street. Perhaps they were rivals. In 1888, Yarmouth could be a ‘code’ for Dorset Street, Norwich could be a ‘code’ for the City of Norwich and its associates.

            An intriguing set of coincidences and suppositions, but maybe it's just that. Coincidence.

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