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  • Originally posted by Tom_Wescott View Post

    That means you own the digital rights to the book and can put your own out. Financially, it would be a good idea to do so.

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott
    If Fish can do this but hasn’t Tom can we deduce that he is so wealthy that he doesn’t need to?
    Regards

    Herlock



    Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

      If Fish can do this but hasn’t Tom can we deduce that he is so wealthy that he doesn’t need to?
      Of course you can. Not that it would be correct, though... Maybe there will be a digital book, I don’ t know. Its early days yet.

      Comment


      • My editor tells me that book distribution via Amazon-owned Book Depository experiences delays due to brexit issues as well as covid. Apparently, it is a common phenomenon right now. Its a bummer, of course, but that is the explanation given!

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

          If Fish can do this but hasn’t Tom can we deduce that he is so wealthy that he doesn’t need to?
          He's a Swedish journalist, so unless he inherited well, I think we can deduce he's NOT wealthy. LOL. But his publisher might be wise in not putting out a Kindle edition right away. It drives up paper sales, and in the world of non-fiction - particularly niche markets such as Ripperology - a lot of the same people who bought the paperback or hardcover would buy the Kindle edition. OR the Kindle edition might be saved for a second edition. I bought the hardcover, because I'm posh like that, but if a Kindle edition comes out, I imagine I'll snap that up. I'm mostly a Kindle guy, but for special books I buy the real thing.

          Yours truly,

          Tom Wescott

          Comment


          • Tom,
            After reading the book,are you convinced Cross was JTR?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
              My editor tells me that book distribution via Amazon-owned Book Depository experiences delays due to brexit issues as well as covid. Apparently, it is a common phenomenon right now. Its a bummer, of course, but that is the explanation given!
              As long as it's not due to a shortage of samples to give away with every copy.

              Comment


              • Hi Christer, just to let you know, my copy direct from Rickard arrived today.
                Only had a brief scan, will comment in depth in a day or so.

                Well done in producing it.


                Steve

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Fisherman View Post

                  Thanks! It’ s from 1875, I believe, and so it fits in quite well within the time frame. I think the cover artist, Nicolas Krizan, did a great job.
                  Hello Fish,

                  That photo of the entrance of the Oxford Arms from Warwick Lane, gracing the cover of your book, was indeed first issued in 1875, and also features on the front cover of a book that is very close to my heart: OLD LONDON, by Graham Bush, published 100 years later, in 1975. The inn itself was demolished in 1878, which is why The Society for Photographing Relics of Old London commissioned this photo, among others, for posterity.

                  The reason why the photo is so special to me is that it was one of a collection taken by my own great grandfather, Alfred Henry Bool, and his brother John, who worked with Henry Dixon. A few years ago, I was able to see the originals in the London Museum.

                  Small world, eh? I'll have to order your book now!

                  Love,

                  Caz
                  X
                  "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by caz View Post

                    Hello Fish,

                    That photo of the entrance of the Oxford Arms from Warwick Lane, gracing the cover of your book, was indeed first issued in 1875, and also features on the front cover of a book that is very close to my heart: OLD LONDON, by Graham Bush, published 100 years later, in 1975. The inn itself was demolished in 1878, which is why The Society for Photographing Relics of Old London commissioned this photo, among others, for posterity.

                    The reason why the photo is so special to me is that it was one of a collection taken by my own great grandfather, Alfred Henry Bool, and his brother John, who worked with Henry Dixon. A few years ago, I was able to see the originals in the London Museum.

                    Small world, eh? I'll have to order your book now!

                    Love,

                    Caz
                    X
                    Kudos, Caz!


                    Do you know if your ancestors had any connection to Bedford Lemere, the photographic firm who recorded historic buildings prior to demolition for the Board of Works?


                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
                      Yes, it’s a great image and relevant on several levels.

                      The inn was demolished in 1876 to accommodate the enlargement of the Old Bailey.

                      It stood in the Ward of Farringdon Within - Polly Nichols was born a short distance away in the Ward of Farringdon Without.

                      And according to an etching from 1880 (see attached) the ramshackle wooden building on the right was at one time the premises of a Carman.

                      Given the geographical diversity of the Ripper and Torso series, it’s a great choice.


                      http://english18thcenturyportraitscu...ngdon.html?m=1
                      Oh my goodness, Gary. Yes, A & J Bool, who took many of these photos, were my Dad's Mum's Dad, Alfred, and her Uncle, John.

                      I never even knew until I got interested in JtR, and I only found out after my Dad died, in 1999, so I couldn't ask him about it. He only ever told me about the portrait studio the Bool brothers had in Pimlico.

                      Love,

                      Caz
                      X
                      "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post

                        Kudos, Caz!


                        Do you know if your ancestors had any connection to Bedford Lemere, the photographic firm who recorded historic buildings prior to demolition for the Board of Works?

                        I'm afraid I have no idea, Gary. They may have done, but I'm not sure how we could find out now.

                        Love,

                        Caz
                        X
                        "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Elamarna View Post
                          Hi Christer, just to let you know, my copy direct from Rickard arrived today.
                          Only had a brief scan, will comment in depth in a day or so.

                          Well done in producing it.


                          Steve
                          Thank you, Steve. As I have pointed out before, I will allow the discussion of the book to develop without any initial participation on my behalf.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by caz View Post

                            Hello Fish,

                            That photo of the entrance of the Oxford Arms from Warwick Lane, gracing the cover of your book, was indeed first issued in 1875, and also features on the front cover of a book that is very close to my heart: OLD LONDON, by Graham Bush, published 100 years later, in 1975. The inn itself was demolished in 1878, which is why The Society for Photographing Relics of Old London commissioned this photo, among others, for posterity.

                            The reason why the photo is so special to me is that it was one of a collection taken by my own great grandfather, Alfred Henry Bool, and his brother John, who worked with Henry Dixon. A few years ago, I was able to see the originals in the London Museum.

                            Small world, eh? I'll have to order your book now!

                            Love,

                            Caz
                            X
                            Small world indeed! Although these kinds of connections must be there, it is nevertheless always fascinating to have them disclosed!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by harry View Post
                              Tom,
                              After reading the book,are you convinced Cross was JTR?
                              Hi Harry, and no.

                              Yours truly,

                              Tom Wescott

                              Comment


                              • Thanks Tom.

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