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Why are you drawn to the case?

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  • #31
    I was 15 when I checked out Tom Cullen's relatively new book, When London Walked In Terror, from the library. I loved history and found the societal background fascinating. I started reading whatever I could on JTR and other Victorian-era crimes from then on. I remember not being convinced at all by Cullen's suspect, M.J. Druitt.
    Joan

    I ain't no student of ancient culture. Before I talk, I should read a book. -- The B52s

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Losmandris View Post
      What is it about the Whitechapel case that so appeals to you? Is it a desire to unmask the killer? Unearth information relating to the victims? Uncovering a grand conspiracy that has been hidden all these years or just a general interest in History? Maybe the sense of community on this site?

      I think for me its a particular interest in time period and history in general, combined with a bit of a childhood fascination with the case and the fact I used to live in the area a few years back.

      How about you? Would love to hear some replies!

      Tristan
      i got drawn into true crime and serial killers in particular having lived through the beltway sniper ordeal. then reaaly into it after that when rader was caught as BTK. been hooked ever since, especially unsolved ones like the ripper and zodiac.
      "Is all that we see or seem
      but a dream within a dream?"

      -Edgar Allan Poe


      "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
      quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

      -Frederick G. Abberline

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      • #33
        I'm drawn to the case because you're [insert poster's name] drawn to the case.

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        • #34
          It was back in, I think, 1970 when McCormick's, The Identity of Jack the Ripper was reprinted. It was the first book on the subject I had seen and I hadn't a clue what it was about. This would be one of the worst books for an initiation into the subject, most of it being pure fantasy. All you will learn from reading this book is how to not present a 'who was the Ripper' theory.
          Don't make up details and present them as facts, don't misrepresent what others have written, and don't invent so-called 'evidence'.
          On that positive note, I'll leave the subject alone.....
          Regards, Jon S.

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          • #35
            I've always had an interest in true crime. Back in the 90s a friend of mine and I got to discussing JtR. He was a historian (mostly interested in war of 1812), and the two of us got into all sorts of discussions that often solved the case on each occasion (usually somewhere in the wee hours of the morning, around the time the beer ran out). Curiously, the solutions were different each time. I've since lost interest in suspect focused ideas, and have become more interested in trying to just get a clear idea of what happened.

            - Jeff

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            • #36
              I wonder what the split is between people who actively have a suspect in mine and those just drawn to the case for the myriad of other reasons i.e. history?

              I have never really been all that interested by the culprit tbh. Though I wonder if the case would have the same draw to me, if we knew who did it? I think it probably would.
              Best Regards,

              Tristan

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Losmandris View Post
                I wonder what the split is between people who actively have a suspect in mine and those just drawn to the case for the myriad of other reasons i.e. history?

                I have never really been all that interested by the culprit tbh. Though I wonder if the case would have the same draw to me, if we knew who did it? I think it probably would.
                Interesting, Tristan!

                I am the exact opposite.

                It's the lack of resolution that draws me in!

                It's hard to say, but I very much doubt that I'd have much awareness of it if this was a solved case.

                I do find the backdrop of London in the LVP fascinating though.

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                • #38
                  I have always been interested in murder mysteries, probably stemming from discovering Sherlock Holmes in my childhood.

                  I also love history in general.

                  Many years later, a friend and I coauthored adventure stories and researched Jack the Ripper via books and documentary films for a story. And I was delighted by the graphic novel "From Hell"!

                  I found the Casebook site some years ago when looking for information on the supposed Shawl and DNA. I became very interested in how discussions raged back and forth in the forum, and learned a lot about all sorts of suspects and theories.

                  It is still fascinating to me.
                  Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                  ---------------
                  Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                  ---------------

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