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  • Steadmund Brand
    replied
    Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
    This weekend they are showing one of my favorites on "Noir Alley", "Born to Kill" with Claire Trevor, Lawrence Tierney, and Walter Slezak, which has one of the most dizzying and twisted "love" triangle stories coupled with power grab that I can recall. And Slezak, playing a prize, but likeable, sleazeball (as only he could) has a marvelous line he says in private on a public street to Trevor (whom he is blackmailing over a past murder), "Isn't it strange to think that people looking at two such respectable figures would never think we are such scoundrels!" He says it with his best smile.

    Jeff
    Thank you... will have to set the DVR for sure... been years since I saw that one... I loved Walter Slezak when he was at his "worst" I also loved him in "Cornered" (probably a few years before "Born To Kill") with Dick Powell

    Steadmund Brand

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  • Mayerling
    replied
    Originally posted by YomRippur View Post
    "Deadline at Dawn" is included on this DVD set from 2010. I was able to rent the disc from Netflix. "Stranger on the 3rd Floor" is out on this remastered DVD. Netflix doesn't have it, but TCM airs it pretty often. Yes, I loved these two films as well. What a super-skinny Peter Lorre and a pretty good dream sequence in "Stranger on the 3rd Floor."
    This weekend they are showing one of my favorites on "Noir Alley", "Born to Kill" with Claire Trevor, Lawrence Tierney, and Walter Slezak, which has one of the most dizzying and twisted "love" triangle stories coupled with power grab that I can recall. And Slezak, playing a prize, but likeable, sleazeball (as only he could) has a marvelous line he says in private on a public street to Trevor (whom he is blackmailing over a past murder), "Isn't it strange to think that people looking at two such respectable figures would never think we are such scoundrels!" He says it with his best smile.

    Jeff

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert St Devil
    replied
    You must have inadvertently put the idea of M out on the social grid yomrippur bc, for all the inexplicables, i found myself looking it up on YouTube a week or two ago. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u3rWLm_PAbc
    i got as far as the kids playing the man in black game; so at this rate, i should finish watching it by 2023.

    i thought the way the town "loses it" during the killing spree at the end of perfume was whitechapelesque, with Alan Rickman being the only one who wanted to apply intellect to apprehending the murderer.

    let the right one in was a creepy film, good tho.

    Leave a comment:


  • YomRippur
    replied
    Originally posted by Steadmund Brand View Post
    THANK YOU MAYERLING!!!!!!!

    That is a film I saw many many years ago on the late late show (remember when networks played movies late at night???) and I never remembered the name of it...and couldn't remember who was in it, so for years I wanted to find it again!!! same thing with a film I saw around the same time called Stranger on the 3rd Floor with Pete Lorre.. took years for me to find it again (these were films I last saw when I was like 12 or 13 years old... and in my mid 40's now)....I'm so glad I started this thread back up

    Steadmund Brand
    "Deadline at Dawn" is included on this DVD set from 2010. I was able to rent the disc from Netflix. "Stranger on the 3rd Floor" is out on this remastered DVD. Netflix doesn't have it, but TCM airs it pretty often. Yes, I loved these two films as well. What a super-skinny Peter Lorre and a pretty good dream sequence in "Stranger on the 3rd Floor."

    Leave a comment:


  • YomRippur
    replied
    Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
    Recently I have been watching a series on Sunday mornings on the Turner Classic Movie Channel called "Noir Alley", and while many of the films like "Scarlet Street" I have seen already, some are new to me. Last Sunday I was watching Paul Lukas and Susan Hayward in "Deadline at Dawn", and it was quite an interesting film (the only movie directed by Harold Clurman of the Broadway "Group Theatre", who is recalled for his work on Clifford Odets' plays like "Awake and Sing"). "Deadline at Dawn" was based on a story by Cornell Woolrich, whom I think of as the equal to Hamnett, Chandler, and James Caine, as a creator of noir stories (Woolrich wrote the story that "Rear Window" was based on). A sailor on leave for a day in New York City, finds his memory of events for a few hours are completely gone, yet feels uneasy, as he finds he has a huge sum of cash on his person that he shouldn't have. He traces, as best as he can, his steps to the last events he has a clear idea of, and soon has the assistance of a dance hall dancer (Hayward) and a cabbie with a philosophical bent (Lukas) to assist him. The fun thing is the dialog, with all sorts of irrelevant but curious points being made by the main players in the film and the secondary ones (like how frequently people ordering orange ade drinks at a corner dinette store never drink them!). Also the number of potential suspects expands the move continues. It's quite a fun experience. Also with Joseph Calleia, Martin Milner, and Jerome Cowan.

    Jeff
    The two high-profile titles in the TCM Noir Alley series are "Woman on the Run" (1950) and "Too Late For Tears" (1949), since both had been long unavailable and were only recently restored. I think TCM has only aired them once. The 1951 Hollywood version of "M" was also featured, and TCM aired a good-looking high-definition version which has yet to be on Blu-ray or DVD. Many of the other noir films have all been aired on TCM pretty frequently, and DVDs have been made for them long ago, such as these DVD sets from Warner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steadmund Brand
    replied
    Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
    Recently I have been watching a series on Sunday mornings on the Turner Classic Movie Channel called "Noir Alley", and while many of the films like "Scarlet Street" I have seen already, some are new to me. Last Sunday I was watching Paul Lukas and Susan Hayward in "Deadline at Dawn", and it was quite an interesting film (the only movie directed by Harold Clurman of the Broadway "Group Theatre", who is recalled for his work on Clifford Odets' plays like "Awake and Sing"). "Deadline at Dawn" was based on a story by Cornell Woolrich, whom I think of as the equal to Hamnett, Chandler, and James Caine, as a creator of noir stories (Woolrich wrote the story that "Rear Window" was based on). A sailor on leave for a day in New York City, finds his memory of events for a few hours are completely gone, yet feels uneasy, as he finds he has a huge sum of cash on his person that he shouldn't have. He traces, as best as he can, his steps to the last events he has a clear idea of, and soon has the assistance of a dance hall dancer (Hayward) and a cabbie with a philosophical bent (Lukas) to assist him. The fun thing is the dialog, with all sorts of irrelevant but curious points being made by the main players in the film and the secondary ones (like how frequently people ordering orange ade drinks at a corner dinette store never drink them!). Also the number of potential suspects expands the move continues. It's quite a fun experience. Also with Joseph Calleia, Martin Milner, and Jerome Cowan.

    Jeff
    THANK YOU MAYERLING!!!!!!!

    That is a film I saw many many years ago on the late late show (remember when networks played movies late at night???) and I never remembered the name of it...and couldn't remember who was in it, so for years I wanted to find it again!!! same thing with a film I saw around the same time called Stranger on the 3rd Floor with Pete Lorre.. took years for me to find it again (these were films I last saw when I was like 12 or 13 years old... and in my mid 40's now)....I'm so glad I started this thread back up

    Steadmund Brand

    Leave a comment:


  • Mayerling
    replied
    Recently I have been watching a series on Sunday mornings on the Turner Classic Movie Channel called "Noir Alley", and while many of the films like "Scarlet Street" I have seen already, some are new to me. Last Sunday I was watching Paul Lukas and Susan Hayward in "Deadline at Dawn", and it was quite an interesting film (the only movie directed by Harold Clurman of the Broadway "Group Theatre", who is recalled for his work on Clifford Odets' plays like "Awake and Sing"). "Deadline at Dawn" was based on a story by Cornell Woolrich, whom I think of as the equal to Hamnett, Chandler, and James Caine, as a creator of noir stories (Woolrich wrote the story that "Rear Window" was based on). A sailor on leave for a day in New York City, finds his memory of events for a few hours are completely gone, yet feels uneasy, as he finds he has a huge sum of cash on his person that he shouldn't have. He traces, as best as he can, his steps to the last events he has a clear idea of, and soon has the assistance of a dance hall dancer (Hayward) and a cabbie with a philosophical bent (Lukas) to assist him. The fun thing is the dialog, with all sorts of irrelevant but curious points being made by the main players in the film and the secondary ones (like how frequently people ordering orange ade drinks at a corner dinette store never drink them!). Also the number of potential suspects expands the move continues. It's quite a fun experience. Also with Joseph Calleia, Martin Milner, and Jerome Cowan.

    Jeff
    Last edited by Mayerling; 07-26-2017, 12:21 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • YomRippur
    replied
    Originally posted by Steadmund Brand View Post
    I LOVED Let the Right One In....thought I was the only one who saw it!!!

    Steadmund Brand
    It was pretty well-known to indie film fans, but pretty much unknown to the public, especially when another vampire film called "Twilight" was released around the same time. It did spawn a pretty good Hollywood remake in 2010 called "Let Me In," with Chloe Moretz as the vampire girl.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steadmund Brand
    replied
    I LOVED Let the Right One In....thought I was the only one who saw it!!!

    Steadmund Brand

    Leave a comment:


  • YomRippur
    replied
    Originally posted by Steadmund Brand View Post
    This Thread has been silent for a bit, so thought I would get it going again....has anyone seen a great classic that they haven't watched in years...or just had some films on their mind.. The Exorcist thread on Audio/Visual got me thinking about this again

    Steadmund Brand
    Speaking of horror films, I've recently delved into a slew of seminal European horror films in the 60s and 70s that remain quite influential, especially to American horror films. Many Italian "giallo" thrillers such as Blood and Black Lace (1962), Bird with Crystal Plumage (1970), Deep Red (1972), Death Walks at Midnight (1972), etc., have very distinct style that continues to influence today's films.

    The 2009 Swedish whodunit "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" creates a memorable lead character and tells a memorable tale of murder that spans generations. It was also made into an equally good 2011 Hollywood film version of the same title.

    Another great Swedish film from 2009 is "Let the Right One In," about a lonely young boy befriending a young vampire girl. In a tired genre that is "vampire film," this little indie film creates many memorable moments that are touching, horrifying, and surprising.

    The visually striking and dream-like 2003 South Korean horror flick "A Tale of Two Sisters" must be seen by all look for non-mainstream and artistic works in the tired haunted-house genre.

    Alfred Hitchcock's 1927 silent thriller "The Lodger" still holds up pretty well as an early example of a suspense film about a serial killer.

    Fritz Lang's 1931 early sound film "M" is still powerful as a police drama about the hunt of a serial murderer.

    Clint Eastwood's 2008 thriller "Changeling" is a nice mixture of a story about a missing person (a la The Lady Vanishes), police corruption, and the hunt of a child murderer. Eastwood turns a potentially tired subject matter into a powerful and transcendent experience. This is probably Angelina Jolie's best acting, too.

    On the low-brow end of things, I've recently seen one of the prime examples of the so-called "hicksploitation" horror genre, which usually involves deranged killers in the southern US. I'm referring to the 1963 cult classic "Two Thousand Maniacs!" A group of southerners celebrate the centenary of the Civil War by kidnapping a group of outsiders and ritualistically killing them.

    Staying on the lower end of things, I've also recently checked out several films by British indie filmmaker Pete walker. His 1976 shocker "House of Mortal Sin" is about an old priest who is so fed up with the promiscuity of young women that he goes out every night and into their homes and cut them up like Jack the Ripper!

    All the above titles are readily available on DVD and Blu-ray in both the US and UK, so enjoy!
    Last edited by YomRippur; 07-25-2017, 02:37 PM.

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  • Robert
    replied
    I thought this one was fantastic.

    DON'T READ THE REVIEWS - SPOILERS

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3704050/?ref_=ttqt_qt_tt

    Leave a comment:


  • GUT
    replied
    Originally posted by Steadmund Brand View Post
    This Thread has been silent for a bit, so thought I would get it going again....has anyone seen a great classic that they haven't watched in years...or just had some films on their mind.. The Exorcist thread on Audio/Visual got me thinking about this again

    Steadmund Brand
    Murder on the Orient Express

    Or

    One Chanel here has just reshoot Back to the Future 1,2 and 3

    Leave a comment:


  • Steadmund Brand
    replied
    This Thread has been silent for a bit, so thought I would get it going again....has anyone seen a great classic that they haven't watched in years...or just had some films on their mind.. The Exorcist thread on Audio/Visual got me thinking about this again

    Steadmund Brand

    Leave a comment:


  • RockySullivan
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Night-Rid...UAAOSwRLZUF2Td

    Edit. Might not be the film you seek. Taken the cast from another listing here in Oz.

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/NEW-Night...4AAOSweW5VX0jf
    Hey thanks DJA, I appreciate that for sure. Yea that's the 1937 film with same name, I'm looking for the 1930 EGR films, seems like nobody has it

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by RockySullivan View Post
    Thanks, I got Outside the Law on DVD & Widow is out now on the Warner Archive. I'd love to see Nite Ride though, it's certainly number 1 on my list of films to see
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Night-Rid...UAAOSwRLZUF2Td

    Edit. Might not be the film you seek. Taken the cast from another listing here in Oz.

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/NEW-Night...4AAOSweW5VX0jf
    Last edited by DJA; 01-04-2017, 07:47 PM. Reason: Edit.

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