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  • best book you've read

    What's the best book you've ever read(ripper related or not)let's see if my favourite pops up on here.
    Last edited by pinkmoon; 10-19-2013, 01:22 PM.
    Three things in life that don't stay hidden for to long ones the sun ones the moon and the other is the truth

  • #2
    Originally posted by pinkmoon View Post
    What's the best book you've ever read(ripper related or not)let's see if my favourite pops up on here.
    You do realize that for a lot of us, favorite books run in the hundreds right? Like I'm not even sure I could squeak by with a top 10.
    The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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    • #3
      Difficult choice, and definitely not Ripper-related...

      There really are so many...but fiction-wise probably Lord of the Rings which, (after the Hobbit at age 7), I came late to, and first read at the age of 17 - I've read it at least twice a year ever since, and still find something new in it every now and again

      Non-Fiction would be an ecuminical matter...

      All the best

      Dave

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      • #4
        You do realize that for a lot of us, favorite books run in the hundreds right? Like I'm not even sure I could squeak by with a top 10.
        Spot on Errata. My spouse has, down the years, grown to hate my books, and as a result of successive weedings, I'm down to my last two or three thousand (cow)...nonetheless I continue to smuggle in the odd volume or six...She's older than I am and it's the least I can do in terms of keeping her mentally alert and active...

        All the best

        Dave

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        • #5
          If I had to pick only one, I suppose I'd take 'Watership Down'.
          - Ginger

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
            Spot on Errata. My spouse has, down the years, grown to hate my books, and as a result of successive weedings, I'm down to my last two or three thousand (cow)...nonetheless I continue to smuggle in the odd volume or six...She's older than I am and it's the least I can do in terms of keeping her mentally alert and active...

            All the best

            Dave
            I had to give all my books away a few hundred in fact due to wife .
            Three things in life that don't stay hidden for to long ones the sun ones the moon and the other is the truth

            Comment


            • #7
              If I had to pick one.. it would be...

              Harold Gimblett..Tormented genius of cricket


              http://www.amazon.co.uk/Harold-Gimbl.../dp/095311967X


              I read and bought the first edition many many years ago and have read it from cover to cover well over 100 times. Being a cricket lover, it attracted me. Seing the psychological aspect of the torment inside a man's mind, fascinated me.


              Simply the best thing I have ever read.



              Phil
              Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


              Justice for the 96 = achieved
              Accountability? ....

              Comment


              • #8
                Dostoevski

                Hello Jason. "The Brothers Karamazov" by Fyodor Dostoevski. Easy choice.

                Cheers.
                LC

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lynn cates View Post
                  Hello Jason. "The Brothers Karamazov" by Fyodor Dostoevski. Easy choice.

                  Cheers.
                  LC
                  I loved his Notes from Underground.

                  Mike
                  huh?

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                  • #10
                    His Dark Materials is fairly close to the top.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No favourite as such, but a few I've read more than once:

                      Stalingrad; Of Mice and Men; I know Why The Caged Bird Sings; Six Weeks; A Berlin Family; Bird Song; The English.

                      For any World War One enthusiasts, six weeks was the life expectancy of an English junior officer during the war, and so the book is titled Six Weeks; and is a look at the ideals of the public schools and their pupils' role and experience during the war.

                      For anyone interested in the development of England, The English (Jeremy Paxman) is a look at a peculiar people who are for the most part unlike any other people on this planet in character and outlook. The sort of people born to compromise: the Scots and Germans had a reformation; we had a falling out with the Pope on practical grounds rather than ideas. A people who guard privacy like our lives depend upon it and are fiercely independent. For example, I'm in the US at the moment and their idea of customer service is coming to your table every 5 minutes to ask if everything is fine. As an Englishman, this is not customer service; it's being a nuisance and it's wanton disregard for my space. Surely the idea is to make sure you're on hand and I'll let you know when I need something? Only the English could have developed a sport such as cricket and only the English could have developed a religion where the ministers recommend that you go to church now and again and providing you keep your nose clean everything will pan out fine - light on dogma; heavy on choice. It's an interesting book and a thinly veiled celebration of our traditions and outlook on life, and Paxman undoubtedly is from the school of: "to be born an Englishman is to win the lottery of life". English people may be surprised by the influence of the Church of England on our character - a case well argued by Paxman.

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                      • #12
                        I once read a book. Green it was.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Fleetwood Mac View Post
                          No favourite as such, but a few I've read more than once:

                          Stalingrad; Of Mice and Men; I know Why The Caged Bird Sings; Six Weeks; A Berlin Family; Bird Song; The English.

                          For any World War One enthusiasts, six weeks was the life expectancy of an English junior officer during the war, and so the book is titled Six Weeks; and is a look at the ideals of the public schools and their pupils' role and experience during the war.

                          For anyone interested in the development of England, The English (Jeremy Paxman) is a look at a peculiar people who are for the most part unlike any other people on this planet in character and outlook. The sort of people born to compromise: the Scots and Germans had a reformation; we had a falling out with the Pope on practical grounds rather than ideas. A people who guard privacy like our lives depend upon it and are fiercely independent. For example, I'm in the US at the moment and their idea of customer service is coming to your table every 5 minutes to ask if everything is fine. As an Englishman, this is not customer service; it's being a nuisance and it's wanton disregard for my space. Surely the idea is to make sure you're on hand and I'll let you know when I need something? Only the English could have developed a sport such as cricket and only the English could have developed a religion where the ministers recommend that you go to church now and again and providing you keep your nose clean everything will pan out fine - light on dogma; heavy on choice. It's an interesting book and a thinly veiled celebration of our traditions and outlook on life, and Paxman undoubtedly is from the school of: "to be born an Englishman is to win the lottery of life". English people may be surprised by the influence of the Church of England on our character - a case well argued by Paxman.
                          I've read stalingrad it's one of the best war books ever I think "a bridge to far "is the best war book I've ever read though
                          Three things in life that don't stay hidden for to long ones the sun ones the moon and the other is the truth

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
                            Spot on Errata. My spouse has, down the years, grown to hate my books, and as a result of successive weedings, I'm down to my last two or three thousand (cow)...nonetheless I continue to smuggle in the odd volume or six...She's older than I am and it's the least I can do in terms of keeping her mentally alert and active...

                            All the best

                            Dave
                            My fiance and I have a deal. We each get a room to do what we want. He has an office. His computer, his guitar, his books. Mine has four bookcases, two very large chests of drawers, wall shelves, and a couple of coffee tables. All filled with or covered with books. I can barely get in and out of my library, and there is certainly no room for a desk and a computer. So I sit on my side of the bed with a laptop. Though to be fair there is also an altar with a couple dozen god images on and around it. I just moved it in there because we needed the space for a table to eat at. I need a bigger room.

                            My favorite books are often bad books. Though not all. Any list would start with Shakespeare. The Hero and The Crown, The Red Tent, Illusions, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, The Shannara series, The Doomsday Book, Good Omens, The Daughter of Time, A Wrinkle in Time, The Last of The Really Great Whangdoodles, Arsenic And Old Lace, Beowulf, Dante's Inferno, Paradise Lost, Mists of Avalon, The Actor's Nightmare, and that just fiction, and thats also just the books I can see from where I am sitting.
                            The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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                            • #15
                              Top five fiction:

                              Complete Sherlock Holmes Canon
                              "A Tale of Two Cities"
                              "Madame Bovary"
                              "1984"
                              "The Secret Agent"

                              Top five history

                              "The Conquest of Mexico" (Prescott)
                              "Montcalm and Wolfe" (Parkman)
                              "The Proud Tower" (Tuchman)
                              "A Night to Remember (Lord)
                              The Complete Jack the Ripper (Rumbelow)

                              Biographies

                              "John Paul Jones" (Morison)
                              "Warwick the Kingmaker" (Kendall)
                              "Andew Jackson" (Remini)
                              "Jefferson" (Dumas Malone)

                              Essays

                              Collected (George Orwell/Eric Blair)

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