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Victorian Script decipher............

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  • #16
    I imagine there would have been numerous coal wharves on both sides of the Thames at that time.

    There was a William Bradley, a coal porter aged 66, living at 12, King Street in 1891. There was a family named Bone at no. 8.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
      I imagine there would have been numerous coal wharves on both sides of the Thames at that time.

      There was a William Bradley, a coal porter aged 66, living at 12, King Street in 1891. There was a family named Bone at no. 8.

      That's interesting, not the smoking gun I'd hoped for, but certainly something to ponder. The fact that we've got somebody called Bradley living on King Street whose a coal porter, is certainly more than a mere coincidence and perhaps adds credence to the Bradley family being resident on King Street and as such why Henry has used this address on his wedding certificate?

      The Bradley's are clearly from Deptford and given that William was a manager and Emma's father was a labourer I would hazard not particularly well off and as such could not pay for his daughters wedding, hence the Bradley's funded and arranged? Hence Deptford not Clapham? Whatever the reason I'm satisfied that the reason for being married at St Paul's was no because he was stationed in Deptford but that he was from there. His service history would support this as it gives service in W Division with no change of collar number for 10 years.

      Thank you to everyone who has replied to my thread, it has all been most helpful and interesting.

      Unfortunately Henry's service in Clapham doesn't make the local papers or warrant any hearings at the Old Bailey, so his first 10 years of service are lost to history. But once he becomes a Sergeant and is posted to Barnet he appears regularly in the local press, so I have been able to put together a snip it of what life was like for a Bobby in that part of London during the period. His service there was far from uneventful!!!

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      • #18
        William Bradley was living at 8, King Street in 1871 and 1881. His occupation was given as a coalheaver in 1871 and a labourer 1881. Whether he was ever the manager of a coal wharf is doubtful, I’d say.

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        • #19
          King Street is apparently now called Watergate Street, just to the east of New King Street

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
            King Street is apparently now called Watergate Street, just to the east of New King Street
            But neither that King Street nor New King Street was ever in Deptford New Town. The one in question was further east and south, just off Deptford Broadway.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post

              But neither that King Street nor New King Street was ever in Deptford New Town. The one in question was further east and south, just off Deptford Broadway.
              Oh yeah. This one;

              https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoo...layers=163&b=1

              ​​​​ Click image for larger version

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
                Hi Joshua,

                Yes, that’s the one.

                Gary

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by c.d. View Post
                  Interesting that Emma is described as a "Spinster" although her age is listed as 19.

                  c.d.
                  Hi c.d.,

                  I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

                  Love,

                  Caz
                  X
                  "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
                    William Bradley was living at 8, King Street in 1871 and 1881. His occupation was given as a coalheaver in 1871 and a labourer 1881. Whether he was ever the manager of a coal wharf is doubtful, I’d say.
                    Thanks MrB, that certainly clears the address situation up nicely. As to whether he was a manager or not, like his son’s two Coronation Medals, I guess we’ll never know.

                    Glad we finally located King Street as well.

                    St Paul’s seems a rather grand place to get married for the average working class family? Did they have to pay for such things in those days?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by The Station Cat View Post

                      Thanks MrB, that certainly clears the address situation up nicely. As to whether he was a manager or not, like his son’s two Coronation Medals, I guess we’ll never know.

                      Glad we finally located King Street as well.

                      St Paul’s seems a rather grand place to get married for the average working class family? Did they have to pay for such things in those days?
                      St. Paul, Deptford was presumably their parish church.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by caz View Post

                        Hi c.d.,

                        I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

                        Love,

                        Caz
                        X
                        Hello Caz,

                        Here in the U.S. "spinster" has a somewhat negative connotation and is usually used to describe an older woman beyond the usual age for marriage. As in boy she was lucky to find somebody at her age.

                        c.d.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by caz View Post

                          Hi c.d.,

                          I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

                          Love,

                          Caz
                          X
                          Yep even 1980 The now Mrs gut was listed as spinster on our marriage certificate at the ripe old age of 18
                          G U T

                          There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by c.d. View Post

                            Hello Caz,

                            Here in the U.S. "spinster" has a somewhat negative connotation and is usually used to describe an older woman beyond the usual age for marriage. As in boy she was lucky to find somebody at her age.

                            c.d.
                            That’s a connotation here too, not sure we have had any other word for a previously unmarried female.
                            G U T

                            There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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                            • #29
                              We have an expression 'old maid' but that is reserved for the elderly.

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                              • #30
                                I have the expression "old boot", but it's reserved for my wife!
                                Them's the vagaries.

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