Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Victorian Script decipher............

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • caz
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert View Post
    We have an expression 'old maid' but that is reserved for the elderly.
    And for men to use because 'maid' is easier to spell than 'spinster'.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

    Leave a comment:


  • caz
    replied
    How about: 'Previously on the shelf'?

    Spinster would have begun as a reference to any unmarried woman of any age who had to earn her own living [by spinning for example].

    Once she got married she was therefore officially considered to be a 'kept' woman.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

    Leave a comment:


  • Al Bundy's Eyes
    replied
    I have the expression "old boot", but it's reserved for my wife!

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert
    replied
    We have an expression 'old maid' but that is reserved for the elderly.

    Leave a comment:


  • GUT
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post

    Hello Caz,

    Here in the U.S. "spinster" has a somewhat negative connotation and is usually used to describe an older woman beyond the usual age for marriage. As in boy she was lucky to find somebody at her age.

    c.d.
    That’s a connotation here too, not sure we have had any other word for a previously unmarried female.

    Leave a comment:


  • GUT
    replied
    Originally posted by caz View Post

    Hi c.d.,

    I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

    Love,

    Caz
    X
    Yep even 1980 The now Mrs gut was listed as spinster on our marriage certificate at the ripe old age of 18

    Leave a comment:


  • c.d.
    replied
    Originally posted by caz View Post

    Hi c.d.,

    I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

    Love,

    Caz
    X
    Hello Caz,

    Here in the U.S. "spinster" has a somewhat negative connotation and is usually used to describe an older woman beyond the usual age for marriage. As in boy she was lucky to find somebody at her age.

    c.d.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    Originally posted by The Station Cat View Post

    Thanks MrB, that certainly clears the address situation up nicely. As to whether he was a manager or not, like his son’s two Coronation Medals, I guess we’ll never know.

    Glad we finally located King Street as well.

    St Paul’s seems a rather grand place to get married for the average working class family? Did they have to pay for such things in those days?
    St. Paul, Deptford was presumably their parish church.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Station Cat
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
    William Bradley was living at 8, King Street in 1871 and 1881. His occupation was given as a coalheaver in 1871 and a labourer 1881. Whether he was ever the manager of a coal wharf is doubtful, I’d say.
    Thanks MrB, that certainly clears the address situation up nicely. As to whether he was a manager or not, like his son’s two Coronation Medals, I guess we’ll never know.

    Glad we finally located King Street as well.

    St Paul’s seems a rather grand place to get married for the average working class family? Did they have to pay for such things in those days?

    Leave a comment:


  • caz
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post
    Interesting that Emma is described as a "Spinster" although her age is listed as 19.

    c.d.
    Hi c.d.,

    I'm pretty sure all first-time brides are described as "Spinster" [of such-and-such parish], regardless of age. Isn't it merely the female equivalent of "Bachelor", to indicate that Emma had not been married previously?

    Love,

    Caz
    X

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
    Hi Joshua,

    Yes, that’s the one.

    Gary

    Leave a comment:


  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post

    But neither that King Street nor New King Street was ever in Deptford New Town. The one in question was further east and south, just off Deptford Broadway.
    Oh yeah. This one;

    https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoo...layers=163&b=1

    ​​​​ Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20200126-224612~2.png
Views:	142
Size:	31.2 KB
ID:	730751

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
    King Street is apparently now called Watergate Street, just to the east of New King Street
    But neither that King Street nor New King Street was ever in Deptford New Town. The one in question was further east and south, just off Deptford Broadway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    King Street is apparently now called Watergate Street, just to the east of New King Street

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    William Bradley was living at 8, King Street in 1871 and 1881. His occupation was given as a coalheaver in 1871 and a labourer 1881. Whether he was ever the manager of a coal wharf is doubtful, I’d say.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X