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DES Drama - Dennis Neilson

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  • DES Drama - Dennis Neilson

    An absolutely fascinating insight into one of the UK's most notorious serial killers of recent times and the investigation into his murders. It concentrates on post arrest of Dennis Neilson and how events then unfolded. I remember the case breaking at the time but have never been especially interested since then. Disappointed and surprised by some of the police behaviour but no spoilers. It has certainly piqued my interest and will look out the Brian Masters biography.

    Be interested in others views, but I would recommend it. David Tennant was, in my view, excellent in his portrayal of Dennis Neilson, bringing out his humanity, arrogance, warped logic and dark side without excusing him or painting him solely as an evil monster.

  • #2
    Yes, etenguy, I thought it was very well done, and Tennant was chillingly like "Des". I also thought Daniel Mays was exceptional, as DCI Peter Jay.

    There's a related documentary tonight at 9pm on ITV called: The Real "Des": the Dennis Nilsen Story, this time with David Tennant as the narrator.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

    "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


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    • #3
      Great drama I thought great viewing and acting David had a uncanny resemblance to Nilsen

      Comment


      • #4
        I haven't seen this drama series yet, but plan to catch up over the weekend.

        I have studied Nielsen though and ultimately it is his ability to be particularly dull which is ironically the most interesting thing about him.

        His biographer claims that seeing his Grandad dead and laid out in the family home at his wake, someone he was close to, triggered his fascination with death. He didn't appear to suffer any childhood sexual or psychological abuse.

        After a stint in the army, a place in the the late 60's / early 70's would have had a huge problem with gays, he ventured into civilian life. Despite he himself finding everything he did as interesting, not many of his lovers did.

        Bizarrely, it is believed he killed those who he was most attracted to and kept them so that they wouldn't leave him. Almost trying to keep them as a collection. He preferred them dead as he could assert full dominance and control, even after death, something that is intrinsic in most serial killers.

        It is said that when he was apprehended by the police after the blocked drains, he was almost relieved that it was over. Another trait quite common in serial killers.
        Last edited by erobitha; 09-17-2020, 08:22 PM.
        "When the legend becomes fact... print the legend"
        - The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by erobitha View Post
          I haven't seen this drama series yet, but plan to catch up over the weekend.

          I have studied Nielsen though and ultimately it is his ability to be particularly dull which is ironically the most interesting thing about him.

          His biographer claims that seeing his Grandad dead and laid out in the family home at his wake, someone he was close to, triggered his fascination with death. He didn't appear to suffer any childhood sexual or psychological abuse.

          After a stint in the army, a place in the the late 60's / early 70's would have had a huge problem with gays, he ventured into civilian life. Despite he himself finding everything he did as interesting, not many of his lovers did.

          Bizarrely, it is believed he killed those who he was most attracted to and kept them so that they wouldn't leave him. Almost trying to keep them as a collection. He preferred them dead as he could assert full dominance and control, even after death, something that is intrinsic in most serial killers.

          It is said that when he was apprehended by the police after the blocked drains, he was almost relieved that it was over. Another trait quite common in serial killers.
          Something I took from the documentary was that Nielson had a sense of pride in getting away with the murders for so long - I'm not sure if that is a true reflection of how he was. Is that something you have come across in your study of him and his crimes?



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          • #6
            I did get the strong impression that Nilsen was an attention seeker who wanted the world to know what he'd achieved, as a low achiever in all other areas. With all that human flesh going down the drains in Muswell Hill, he must have known it would not be long before his name would be known for all time, and going to prison for the rest of his life was the price he was prepared to pay for that notoriety. He didn't know what it was to feel ashamed, and I don't buy that it was seeing his grandfather dead that set him off or influenced his later behaviour. It was a fascinating hobby to him, like other people collect stamps, coins, butterflies, snakes - or Jack the Ripper books.

            Keep on spelling his name wrong guys - I reckon he'd have hated that!

            Love,

            Caz
            X
            "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by caz View Post

              Keep on spelling his name wrong guys - I reckon he'd have hated that!

              Love,

              Caz
              X
              Ha ha - only noticed that! I'm not suprised you spotted it :0
              "When the legend becomes fact... print the legend"
              - The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by etenguy View Post

                Something I took from the documentary was that Nielson had a sense of pride in getting away with the murders for so long - I'm not sure if that is a true reflection of how he was. Is that something you have come across in your study of him and his crimes?


                The lead detective who arrested Nilsen at the time said he got the impression he was relieved to have been caught finally. However, as Caz points out - flushing body parts down the loo seems like he wanted to be caught. That's not the behaviour of someone wanting to continue incognito. How much is nature and how much is nurture has always been a huge debate amongst criminologists and profilers. No serial killer is ever truly 'remarkable' but Nilsen is certainly one of the most unremarkable serial killers there ever has been. Which, is why his case it is interesting.
                "When the legend becomes fact... print the legend"
                - The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by caz View Post
                  Keep on spelling his name wrong guys - I reckon he'd have hated that!

                  Love,

                  Caz
                  X
                  That's embarrassing - not only did I give him an extra e - I also changed where I put it! Not to mention the o.

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                  • #10
                    Only embarrassing for Denise Niallsan if he were still alive.
                    "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by erobitha View Post
                      I haven't seen this drama series yet, but plan to catch up over the weekend.

                      I have studied Nielsen though and ultimately it is his ability to be particularly dull which is ironically the most interesting thing about him.

                      His biographer claims that seeing his Grandad dead and laid out in the family home at his wake, someone he was close to, triggered his fascination with death. He didn't appear to suffer any childhood sexual or psychological abuse.

                      After a stint in the army, a place in the the late 60's / early 70's would have had a huge problem with gays, he ventured into civilian life. Despite he himself finding everything he did as interesting, not many of his lovers did.

                      Bizarrely, it is believed he killed those who he was most attracted to and kept them so that they wouldn't leave him. Almost trying to keep them as a collection. He preferred them dead as he could assert full dominance and control, even after death, something that is intrinsic in most serial killers.

                      It is said that when he was apprehended by the police after the blocked drains, he was almost relieved that it was over. Another trait quite common in serial killers.


                      I haven't read the book 'killing for company' but is it true he was the tenant who actually complained about the blocked drains?

                      and then once the alarm was raised he unblocked them himself... at night.

                      Was he in turmoil or just not thinking straight when he made the call?


                      great writing and although i'm not a fan of David tennant it has to be said he played 'des' aswell as anyone could have done.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kaz View Post



                        I haven't read the book 'killing for company' but is it true he was the tenant who actually complained about the blocked drains?

                        and then once the alarm was raised he unblocked them himself... at night.

                        Was he in turmoil or just not thinking straight when he made the call?


                        great writing and although i'm not a fan of David tennant it has to be said he played 'des' aswell as anyone could have done.
                        Probably pissed knowing Dennis.

                        How can you not like David Tennant, the best Dr Who?
                        Thems the Vagaries.....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi folks,

                          Recently watched this tv drama. Found it grotesquely compelling with David Tennant's performance chillingly effective.

                          One thing and a parallel which struck me. The only creature Nilsen appeared to care for was his dog Bleep which ended up being put down having been taken away by the police. Similarly, Moors murderer Myra Hindley conveyed no remorse in custody for the children she had killed; her only upset and indeed anger was in respect of her dog Puppet. Hindley's pet died under an anaesthetic requisitioned by the police in a strange attempt to ascertain the dog's age and relate it to when photographs showing both the dog and victims' burial sites were taken.

                          Btw, and I'll hide behind Al in going off topic , Tennant imo has been the best Dr Who of this century but not of all time. That accolade goes to the late Patrick Troughton, a very fine and versatile actor whose contribution to Who is too often neglected.

                          Best regards,
                          OneRound
                          Last edited by OneRound; 09-30-2020, 11:11 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by OneRound View Post
                            Hi folks, Btw, and I'll hide behind Al in going off topic , Tennant imo has been the best Dr Who of this century but not of all time. That accolade goes to the late Patrick Troughton, a very fine and versatile actor whose contribution to Who is too often neglected.
                            Best regards,
                            OneRound
                            I think you are right about David Tennant and I believe that if it wasn't for Patrick Troughton, Dr Who may have faded away in the sixties. Nevertheless, Tom Baker surely has to be top of the classic Dr Who doctors.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by etenguy View Post

                              I think you are right about David Tennant and I believe that if it wasn't for Patrick Troughton, Dr Who may have faded away in the sixties. Nevertheless, Tom Baker surely has to be top of the classic Dr Who doctors.
                              Tom baker for sure is #1

                              but for me he WAS the Dr as thats all I knew him has...

                              when Davidson took over it was....well, thats the guy outa all creatures great and small



                              Just received the book, killing for company. Seems like he did complain about the drains(in writing) and general upkeep of the property

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