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Who Killed Julia Wallace? - New Evidence

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  • Who Killed Julia Wallace? - New Evidence

    I am currently in contact with Merseyside police and researching this case intently. I will only post completely new or very little known evidence here, as anyone who cares about the case still already knows the currently established facts.

    ---

    1. The strange man in a taxi, as brought up by Sherlock Houses in a previous thread. At about 7 on the night of a murder near Wolverton Street, a Wallace-looking man took a taxi ride down to Sefton park, after asking the taxi driver anxiously "you won't kill me will you?" then apologizing stating he is in a nervous state. This man was well-spoken and about 50 years of age, 5'11 with rimmed glasses, a darkish overcoat, hair just starting to turn grey, and carrying an umbrella. Interestingly, Sydney Green described the towering Wallace as a mere 5'10. He was dropped off about a 6 minute walk from the first tram Wallace was allegedly sighted on at Smithdown Road.

    2. At 10 PM on the night of a killing a man named Daniel O'Mara committed suicide about 30 minutes away from the Wallace home after threatening onlookers with an iron bar, setting his baby alight, and jumping headfirst out of a window. Likely unrelated.

    3. New testimony: A woman came forward saying that at the time of the murder a woman approached her in Menlove Gardens West, asking for directions to Menlove Gardens East around 15.00 (before reading of the crime in the Echo at just after 4 PM that day). Being very familiar with the area, the witness told this other woman that there was definitely no such road. However the woman insisted that there was and claimed that she had actually been there herself... The witness claims that during the trial she was able to connect this woman to Amy Wallace of Ullet Road (Amy of course, being one of the only people who knew with certainty that William was going on the trip that night).

    4. At the end of July 1992, John Barratt from Garston Library, held a public meeting at 2.30 PM on a Tuesday at Rawdon Library (Breck Road), claiming that he had unearthed new information. Details of this meeting cannot be found by myself.

    5. An M.P. named Bob Parry (according to Gannon - no relation to Richard Gordon Parry), wrote to Merseyside chief-constable Ken Oxford after Wilkes' radio program aired, asking that he release any information that will clear Parry's name. Bob Parry tabled six questions at the house of commons demanding a fresh look at the Wallace case after the radio program aired, but apparently was refused.

    6. New testimony: "Mrs. Wallace was one of the most peaceful and loveable of women. In fact her kindness was perhaps her only fault. Her husband, my brother-in-law, was perhaps nervous of her being all alone at home at night, as they had no family, and had told her more than once not to open the door to strangers." - Amy Wallace, claiming that Julia was in the habit of opening the door to strangers (assume so, given William had to apparently tell her more than once not to do it).

    7. New testimony: Given by a "George Munro" to the newspapers... According to Mr. Munro, after being released William "spoke no confidence" to anyone but himself (Munro) and his brother until at least some days after when Munro left him at some place in the Lake District where he was born. Munro goes on to slate what he sarcastically refers to as "expert" criminologists, saying their deductions and recreations are "fantastical". He claims that in those days Wallace reviewed the facts of the crime to him, and that the version of events differed greatly from any theories of the criminologists - but that he was not prepared to tell anyone about Wallace's story of the trial or the alleged murder.

    However, he did add one fact for the "benefit of the criminologists", saying that William already knew he was dying when he was arrested, and also knew this when he was sentenced and when he was freed. Apparently Wallace had told him this fact on the day of his release after he'd introduced him to three dramatic critics, at his own request, under a pseudonym. Beside this he added "Are you there Swaff?". In final parenthesis he added:

    "Lest there be mistake, the exception mentioned among the murder rewrite gang, is Tennyson Jesse".

    This was in reference to an earlier line which said: "As for those 'experts' who rewrite famous crimes, for them, with one exception, the donkey stall."

    8. Apparently William was remarkably calm and played the violin in his cell.

    9. Tit-Bits magazine (http://www.tilleysvintagemagazines.c...oice=MAGAZINES) contained testimony from William Herbert Wallace. I believe this is separate from the ghost-written John Bull articles. In this magazine, he recalled how five times since before he had even been forced to move back to England and married Julia, he had been told by doctors that he only had a few months to live.

    10. New testimony: from Ann Miller given to newspapers: "I have never really met a nicer man than Mr. Wallace. He came into the house and passed some jovial remarks. He asked me the time, I looked at the clock and it was a quarter to six. It was a constant habit of his to ask the time, and he would always look down at his own watch after he asked the time." Ann Miller was Wallace's last call on the day of the murder.

    11. New testimony: Detective Bailey's son claimed that he had always been led to believe that his father had arrested William, and that his father said while taking him into custody, Wallace remarked: "Well Bailey, you have arrested me. Now you have to prove I did it."

    12. In early 1930 Liverpool, a gang of youths were arrested for breaking into stores. They made use of skeleton keys. A boy named Clough, on his arrest, had in his possession a notebook on which "Our Gang" was written, and a list of names. He also had a number of files which had been used to make 22 skeleton keys, as well as a flash lamp. They had also broken into the home of a gang member twice because he said he was going to leave the gang.

    13. In December 1930, Liverpool, two unnamed fourteen year old boys (the same age as Alan Close) were arrested for breaking into homes using a duplicate key and stealing from the gas meters. One of the meters stolen from was at one of the boy's parents' homes, the other at the home of a neighbor on the same street.

    14. Inspector Gold who believes Wallace guilty, refused to discuss the crime even with his best friends. He regards "any secrets he holds concerning the crime as official and impersonal."

    ---

    That is my research for today, 5 new testimonies unearthed (one connected to Amy Wallace). I will post more research here as it is uncovered.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	xhYH2ta.png Views:	0 Size:	29.9 KB ID:	720779Click image for larger version  Name:	ihYtzGK.png Views:	0 Size:	24.5 KB ID:	720781

    Rare photo of William Herbert Wallace (left) and brother Joseph Wallace (right).
    Last edited by WallaceWackedHer; 09-02-2019, 12:40 AM.

  • #2
    Update: Apparently the Munro from the newspaper article is a playwright born in Scotland. The article was published in 1939. However, it is possible the two are related, as it is strange that man claims intimate knowledge, and discusses that William already knew he was dying (something I don't think was known at the time?).

    2) I made an appeal and somebody posted to me that they are currently writing a book, and that they are sure of who the killer is, and that it is someone "rarely mentioned who was known to the Wallaces, especially to Julia". Because I had already named Parry, the neighbors, and anyone else I can think of that this may relate to, I think they may be discussing either Dr. Curwen or someone like Amy Dennis... In regards to Dr. Curwen, it is known that it was said Julia had visited Dr. Curwen two times on the day before the murder. Dr. Curwen said she visited him only once to pay a bill...

    ---

    I was going to wait longer to update this thread after uncovering more new evidence and testimony to make a longer post, but I thought it was important to give the information about Munro, as it appears to clearly be George Munro the playwright not Hector... Although as said, they could still be related and he does seem to have knowledge I don't think was known to people.

    Comment


    • #3
      New Testimony: More exceptionally unknown than new. However a very persistent witness went to the police multiple times, claiming that he had seen Amy Wallace and a man he identified as William together on Scotland Road at 20:10 on the night of the murder.

      The man identified as William had asked for directions to the "landing stage" (this would be at the docks). The witness told them they were going the wrong way and offered to put them on the tram. The man identified as William turned to the woman who seemed very afraid and said "we. must. not. go. on. that. car."

      The witness found this very suspicious and reported it to the police after hearing about the murder. He was not called back, but returned to the police several times, and wrote a letter which is contained in the Home Office's records.

      During the trial, witness rang up the CID in Dale Street twice and asked if his testimony could be of any use.

      After conviction, while the trial was pending, witness saw a low res photo of William in the Empire News, and identified it as being the man he had seen. He requested from the police a higher quality photograph or a police lineup, but was told "don't worry, we have Julia Wallace's husband."

      When the appeal was allowed, he again went to the police.

      After reading the John Bull articles, which contained a number of photos, witness said he was certain William was the man he had seen and that the woman was his sister-in-law (Amy Wallace). He then went to the police once again and was told to wait. Later he wrote "Result. Julia Wallace's husband died and the police state in the Empire News that they never had any other clue to the murder and although such a long time had elapsed they would open the case again."

      Later that day he went to the police once again and they took a fresh statement from the witness. An inspector later came and saw him and said to forget it since Julia Wallace's husband was dead.

      The man then wrote a letter to the Secretary of State, who wrote back that they could find no grounds for taking action in the matter.

      ---

      Note that William gave up his hunt and left after the newsagent's and caught a tram at roughly 8 PM on his described route home, although as noted, nobody had seen him to confirm he had been on those trams on his way back.

      According to modern day Google Maps, Scotland Road is about 5 miles away, 15 minutes by car, but I do not know the layout of roads at that time, etc.

      ---

      Also note that the first suspect the police hunted and eventually gave up on (see point #1 in the original post) took a cab at around 7 PM and stopped at Kingsley Road and went off down one of the side streets. From here to Scotland Yard is 3 miles. At an average walking pace it is an hour walk, which would allow that person to have arrived at Scotland Road at about 8 PM.

      From Scotland Road to Wolverton Street would be about 35 to 40 minutes at an average walking pace (it's around 1.7 miles), which cuts through the Rupert Lane Recreation Ground.

      From Scotland Road to the landing stage which I presume to be Princes Dock, although again this is modern landscapes, it is about 1 mile, 20 minutes at an average walking pace.

      From Scotland Road to the landing stage and then to Wolverton Street, you're looking at 1 hour and 30 minutes. If the man and woman parted ways however you could surmise one went to the dock and the other somewhere else. However - if neither went to Wolverton Street then of course the timing to get to Wolverton Street is irrelevant. It would only matter if William was the man identified, that he would not be able to get to the dock and then return home, all by foot, in time.
      Last edited by WallaceWackedHer; 10-03-2019, 12:43 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        In light of the above I should add the exact quote of the woman (a J. Keary) who had claimed to have been asked for directions to Menlove Gardens East by a woman she was able to connect to Amy Wallace:

        https://i.imgur.com/HlgtQiU.png

        And also add the reminder that the only people it is verified as fact knew William would be going on the business trip is William, Julia, and Amy Wallace. Members of the chess club or any staff who had worked there that night and been down into the basement where the meetings were held may also have known or surmised he would be going on this trip, and basically every detail about the trip down to the tram route he'd probably take.

        If the witnesses are correct, then Amy Wallace had visited Julia at about the time William left the home or at the time he was seen allegedly "looking distressed", had been with Wallace or a man strongly resembling him at around 20:10 on the night of the murder, and then on the following day (or earlier the same day? It is not 100% clear what that witness means although I'm sure it means the following day before the newspapers with the story had been delivered) was in Menlove Gardens West asking someone where Menlove Gardens East was.

        All allegedly.

        The witness mentioned in the above post who I assume was a tram conductor seems certainly reliable, but may have been simply mistaken in his sighting and identification of the people he had seen. The lady's testimony about Amy Wallace sounds sincere on the surface but I don't know that it was Amy Wallace or anyone connected to her that she had seen. But she may have been asked that question by a woman.
        Last edited by WallaceWackedHer; 10-03-2019, 01:06 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by WallaceWackedHer View Post
          New Testimony: More exceptionally unknown than new. However a very persistent witness went to the police multiple times, claiming that he had seen Amy Wallace and a man he identified as William together on Scotland Road at 20:10 on the night of the murder.

          The man identified as William had asked for directions to the "landing stage" (this would be at the docks). The witness told them they were going the wrong way and offered to put them on the tram. The man identified as William turned to the woman who seemed very afraid and said "we. must. not. go. on. that. car."
          The "landing stage" was and still is located at the Pier Head, WWH. It is where passengers get on and off the Mersey Ferries.
          *************************************
          "A body of men, HOLDING THEMSELVES ACCOUNTABLE TO NOBODY, ought not to be trusted by anybody." --Thomas Paine ["Rights of Man"]

          "Justice is an ideal which transcends the expedience of the State, or the sensitivities of Government officials, or private individuals. IT HAS TO BE PURSUED WHATEVER THE COST IN PEACE OF MIND TO THOSE CONCERNED." --'Justice of the Peace' [July 12th 1975]

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sherlock Houses View Post

            The "landing stage" was and still is located at the Pier Head, WWH. It is where passengers get on and off the Mersey Ferries.
            Yes that's what I meant, I'm not familiar with ferries and docks etc. etc. so just assumed dock was the correct terminology.

            I have located a huge number of resources which will be coming to be shortly. I have managed to track down the ultra rare book by John Rowland (whos' agent first tried to interview Gordon Parry before even Goodman had) which may have some interesting and very obscure contemporary facts.

            Dorothy L. Sayers also has some good contemporary information. By that I mean, in the modern day we have zero idea about gas jets and so on. According to her, it was completely usual to light a match in the threshold of the door to a room if you thought you would be needing to light a jet in there (she said she personally did so when out of habit when making the switch from gas to electric), and that it was also very natural to light the jet you were used to lighting, since unused jets tended to clog up and not function correctly all the time. Stuff like this is something none of us could know in the present day.

            She also said it was usual if you were neighbours to walk in and out of your neighbor's back kitchen. Except here she uses that apparent fact of the times to prove that the Johnstons barely knew the Wallaces at all (since they stated they had only ever been into her parlour). It sounds weird if people at the time really did do that... She does say in the same book that the back door would have been expected to be bolted. She writes a LOT about the locks and bolts, types of locks and bolts she believes they were based on the evidence, etc.

            The quote is as follows:

            "On all three occasions (that the Johnstons had been into the Wallace's home) Wallace (meaning William) had been absent, so that Mrs. Johnston had never seen the Wallaces together in their own home; nor, evidently, had the two women been accustomed to run in and out of each other's back kitchens in the informal way that neighbours sometimes fall into."
            Last edited by WallaceWackedHer; 10-04-2019, 01:05 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Also a few more known facts but more obscure for casual readers, and #3 is overlooked heavily:

              1) According to, I think the Wilkes book, William and Caird were actually the founders of the chess club despite Beattie being the captain. So I wonder if that means they were financially responsible for it, or in some way had some monetary stake in it.

              Caird had been into the Wallaces' home many times, and his house is #3 Letchworth Street which is directly next to the lower end of Richmond Park. He may have even been able to see William leave on his journey from the window of his own house. I think it's a myth that anyone would have definitely had to have staked out William's front and back door. It looks like Richmond Park is his usual route when going out, and the only times he goes out at night are essentially for no reason other than to go to the chess club or to lecture in chemistry at the college.

              On the night of the chess club Caird had turned up despite having no partner to play (in the hopes he might find someone else without a partner to have a casual chess match with), and prompted Beattie that Wallace had arrived so Beattie would deliver the message.

              2) William went home with Caird and another friend that night which I assume was a very typical practice given their homes were so close together. In their conversation on the way home Caird said he had heard of the name Qualtrough after William brought it up as an odd name.

              3) Known but overlooked... The chess board is directly beside the door to the café, and some might say importantly, the telephone number of the café is etched on the door's window. So anybody who had just glanced at the board while leaving would then almost immediately see the telephone number on the door, and it could very well implant an idea into their head.

              ---

              I will hopefully soon have more entirely new information. By the end of the month I should have all the publications on this matter including obscure books and old magazines (apart from The Insurance Man and William's non-ghostwritten story in tit-bits which I can't get a hold of).

              Comment


              • #8
                BRAND NEW INFORMATION. MORE INCOMING.

                I have some publications which have arrived. I redact my statement in Antony M. Brown's thread about blood splatter. There is some but specks. And all concentrated on one area. I will show you:

                https://i.imgur.com/oscd3lq.png

                https://i.imgur.com/qqZpkai.png

                Ignore the curtain mark in the first photo it is a glitch with the photo. The other angle (the second image) has similar marks that look to be glitches rather than blood specks (e.g. on the photos around the chair and one on the mantlepiece - I THINK these may be glitches). Here's a close up so you can see:

                https://i.imgur.com/A7s5ymB.png

                The dark marks on the top left are where staples have been, it is not part of the photograph.

                The dots you see to the left of the fireplace are blood specks. As was said, the blood is "a little too low (for Julia) to be standing". Are we confident those are marks from the first hit, or from the followup shots flicking blood off of the weapon when she's on the ground?

                Here is a close up and higher res photo of the backyard gate so you can look at the bolt mechanisms:

                https://i.imgur.com/ZQDD4Ne.png

                That's a double bolt. Does it necessarily matter? No, the window cleaners were easily able to scale the walls earlier in the day. However, Dorothy L. Sayers makes a point on the importance of whether the gate is on a spring (and thus shuts automatically), because she says William met the Johnstons and the back gate was shut, which does not align with panic had he found the back door fastened against him and been panicked to rush round to the front.

                Though I don't think he himself says he was "panicked", just uneasy.

                Here is the kitchen, circled is the cash box. Close ups as well:

                https://i.imgur.com/d9WQUwM.png

                https://i.imgur.com/rJ9gKAo.png

                https://i.imgur.com/dLQx9ck.png

                https://i.imgur.com/wOqA8Of.png

                Photos of the toilet and sink. That cannot be a blood mark on the tap or no doubt that would be brought up I'm sure. Not sure why there is newspaper on the floor by the toilet:

                https://i.imgur.com/UkYg7lA.png

                https://i.imgur.com/fn6hUT7.png

                Here is a form for the Prudential with Wallace listed as the agent, I have not seen this before:

                https://i.imgur.com/kDm7kmp.png

                ---

                All the photos in one album:

                https://imgur.com/a/jmNMDhr

                Comment


                • #9
                  Continuing from above, I managed to find another high-res photograph online. I have marked what appears to be blood in red. In blue are marks which appear in both but may not be blood or may be an actual issue with the original photograph itself (if the marks on that seat of the chair in the foreground are blood, did MacFall ever mention those?), and in green are marks on this photograph which on my copy are entirely clean and I believe are not present:

                  https://i.imgur.com/x21BJyz.png

                  Below I will bulletpoint evidence, crime scene facts, and information from this first source I shall be researching: Which is -

                  "Murder Casebook issue #25 - The Perfect Murder: A true-life whodunnit in which the real killer remains unknown":

                  . Wallace arrived at the chess club at 7.40 PM (Disputed)

                  . He played a match with McCartney because it turned 7.45 and thus it was assumed he was not attending (Disputed)

                  . A chess club member said there was "definitely a Menlove Gardens North, South and West, but he had never come across an East," He added that the area was "not the sort to knock about in at night." (Have not heard that he said there's "definitely a North, South and West but hadn't known of an East")

                  . Wallace told the assembled company that his "job required him to collect premiums from houses around the Clubmoor district and he was confident he could find Menlove Gardens East."

                  . There were two other homes burgled on Wolverton Street, "20 to 30" in the surrounding area.

                  . "Walls so thin the neighbours could hear everything that happened next door."

                  . Re-iteration of Wallace's route on the night of the killing:

                  Leaves home by the back door at 18:45 > Walks 300 yard to board a tram at Belmont Road > Changes tram at Smithdown Avenue to a No. 4 > Changes tram at Penny Lane to a 5A > Arrives at Menlove Avenue at 7:20.

                  . Apparently conductor Thomas Phillips on the No. 4 tram had suggested "various other more direct routes to the area" first, before suggesting he stay on the No. 4 part of the way. Apparently Wallace reminded Phillips of his final destination three times over the course of the 10 minute journey.

                  . Much to Julia's delight, this magazine states she was 8 years younger than William and the only daughter of veterinary surgeon William Dennis and his French wife, Aimée. Which we know are fabrications made up by Julia when really her parents were uneducated and poor and she was 17 years OLDER than Wallace

                  . Julia, while living in Harrogate before marrying William, earned money through clerical work and renting out rooms in her house.

                  . William immediately noticed signs of disturbance upon entering, seeing a wooden case with its lid broken off and lying on the floor (cannot locate this on the photos).

                  . The bookcase is 7 feet tall, as you know the cash box is on top of this bookcase.

                  . In this magazine, it is stated William only searched the cash box after John had left for the police. It also states William first noticed the mackintosh after John had left for the police. These two points are contradicted or disputed on trial.

                  . Jewelry of Julia's was clearly visible but untouched in the master bedroom (we do not know that the killer ever went upstairs despite the blood marks).

                  . The shot to the FRONT left side of the temple is re-iterated as being the killing blow.

                  . Wallace on his voyage to India: "I imagine I felt like a second Christopher Columbus." Described his life with Julia as a "Darby and Joan existence." (Darby and Joan is a proverbial phrase for a married couple content to share a quiet life of mutual devotion.)

                  . Wallace had spent time living in Manchester before moving to Harrogate (important because Dorothy L. Sayers claims Qualtrough was a common surname there).

                  . In Shanghai, due to "immunity from Chinese law", gangs of prostitution and drugs were rife, and communist revolutionaries, and a growing body of Christians.

                  . The chess club ALSO met on thursdays, but was for players of a different class to Wallace, which included James Caird. This is the same night Parry attended the drama club. Could Parry have known someone at the chess club such as James Caird and concocted a scheme? James Caird, despite having nobody matched up with him, had attended the chess club on the night of the call, and by some accounts prompted Beattie that Wallace had arrived. Other accounts state Beattie asked Caird for Wallace's address at which point Caird pointed out Wallace was there.

                  [James Caird also lived at #3 Letchworth Street, and could basically see the entry William left his home by from the windows of his own home. The view MAY be blocked by houses but it's honestly hard to tell. But for sure he could keep watch from a mere few yards from his front door, and knew the tram route William would probably be taking. James Caird also assured William that he had heard of the name Qualtrough before.]

                  . Only 5 of the 7 people (unnamed) identified William as being the man they had spoken to on the night of the murder when he was asking for directions to Menlove Gardens East. The other two were identified by Wallace instead... I would like to know which of the witnesses did not identify him, considering Mr. Sydney Green identified the towering Wallace who asked him for directions as being a mere 5'10.

                  . Wallace could not have left his home later than 18:49 on the night of the murder turning up at the tram stop and boarding immediately, and this is apparently based on the timings of the "Anfield Harriers", the detectives who essentially sprinted the journey? From what I can discern. I'm sure William can "haul ass" in an emergency, but sprinting, hardly... And imagine someone had seen him literally sprinting Usain Bolt style? It'd be hard to miss.

                  . Wallace states that the two weeks waiting in jail for the trial were the worst of his life, and he "regrets that he did not commit suicide upon finding his wife dead".

                  . It does seem digestion of stomach contents has been used to estimate time of death to prosecute, such as in the case of Steven Truscott. We know the stomach contents of Julia from Gannon's book, and the alleged time she had eaten, but I do not know any forensic scientists who can connect his findings with a time of death.

                  . The judge who allowed Wallace's appeal was well known to believe in the theory that "the jury is always right", which made the defence feel unconfident about the result.

                  . This magazine brings up the idea of the "distraction burglary". That is, someone was in the parlour with Julia keeping her distracted while a second person entered the home through the back and stole from the cash box. It postulates the person in the parlour hit Julia to silence her because he/she was known to her, and a sound made by the robber in the back of the home had occurred which alerted Julia.

                  ---

                  Next Book Explored: Two Studies in Crime by Yseult Bridges, with a personal letter from Yseult Bridges and inscription.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Two Studies in Crime by Yseult Bridges, with a personal letter from Yseult Bridges and inscription:

                    It has an "Ex Libris" sticker to Jonathan Goodman, 43 Ealing Village, I wonder if it's the same Goodman who authored the Wallace book? It'd be pretty cool if I am holding his personal copy of the book. I believe there may be some pencil marks in the book, and if it is Goodman's, may point out things he found significant.

                    The personal letter is in here, it's addressed to "Mr Wilson", author of "The Trial of Peter Manuel". It is not much noteworthy except she said she favors the Scottish "not proven" verdict as people assume Wallace is innocent to be let off on appeal. She, in a kind way, accuses this Mr Wilson or wanting to preserve mysteries while she likes to solve them.

                    The letter is dated 24th May 1959, and the address on the top left reads (I assume this is Yseult's address): 54 THE MINT, 30 Mermaid Street, Rye, Sussex.

                    Facts from the book:

                    . Important: I want to get this out there first because this makes me question the validity of the birth certificate that was uncovered. Has anyone ever verified it or just accepted it as fact? Here's why... This is Julia's house, which she lived in alone in Harrogate:

                    https://i.imgur.com/lOjAMQV.png

                    This is the house of a peasant-woman? These homes are worth over half a million pounds, I have checked. Just a flat alone costs around £200,000 on this street (Julia actually made money by renting out rooms on the property alongside clerical work). The address is 11 St. Mary's Avenue, Harrogate. If Julia really is a middle-aged peasant-woman at this point, I would like to know how she came to own a house with a price-tag like that. It's open to speculation, but I think it warrants a verification of that birth certificate being the one which belongs to THE Julia Dennis of this case.

                    When William married Julia he moved his family into this house with Julia, including his father and sister. Further can be found later*

                    Moving on...

                    . The usual 9 PM arrival of Constable Fred Williams, and the usual William statement ending "and this is what I found..." this book states he gestured to the dead body of Julia at the end, so by "what he found" he was specifically referring to the body. He then closed the door to the parlour before leading Williams around the home.

                    . Emphasis on the fact all the downstairs lights were turned off and yet the killer was able to leave the house in darkness without getting blood on anything on the way out or disturbing furniture. A weak point I feel, because it was possible to have use of a match, or even a torch in those days which gangs of housebreaking youths were found in possession of.

                    . Emphasis on the fact the assailant killed her in the parlour without attracting the attention of neighbours despite the thin party walls. Mitigated if the Johnstons had involvement to any degree at all. If MacFall is right that she was killed near the armchair by the fireplace, not only was she killed in the adjacent room, but very, very close to that thin wall as well.

                    ---

                    On William, his family, and his background:

                    [Much is dissected of the John Bull articles, but these are ghostwritten, though I will post her musings anyway]:

                    . William says he was born in the Lake District, actually born in Millom, to middle-class respectable parents Benjamin and Margery.

                    . Questions his "wanderlust" saying she thinks he was attracted abroad for the money, and once he returned to England he never adventured again.

                    . Re-iterates his thirst for academia and knowledge since boyhood.

                    . Alleges that his favourite relaxation in those days was to take solitary countryside walks, memorizing the highways and byways, alleys and shortcuts. (Seems like a possible prejudicial statement from the author, to show he would have memorized the side streets in Mossley Hill).

                    . Yseult believes it is extremely important that William never divulges details as to the exact nature and name of his illness.

                    . Yseult states after William had the operation to remove his kidney his health improved greatly and he became outgoing, and began to focus on social and political matters.

                    . Believes the statement that his "financial situation became precarious" and speculates he may have had to borrow money to tide him over.

                    . Yseult emphasizes William avoided naming his birthplace, nature of his illness, and connection to Harrogate.

                    . In Harrogate he at first took up lodgings, but then in late 1910, 9 Belmont Road was tkaen in his father's name. His mother was dead by this point. William, Jessie (his sister) and his father Benjamin all lived in this home.

                    . Speculates that William's family would be proud of his position at the Liberal party, that his sister would have provided good nourishing food, and that William would have probably written glowing accounts of his prospects to his brother Joseph.

                    . Yseult alleges he enjoyed addressing audiences, and that he was filled with a passionate longing to shine, to dazzle, and to be the centre of attention; but was held in check by the dread of rebuffs.

                    . Yseult claims that being in contact with a "different world from the purely commercial one he had formerly occupied, Wallace perceived his lack of poise and gained the entrée into one of those literary and artistic circles which flourish in spas and watering-places such as Harrogate; and here he met Julia."

                    . States it is an illusion that the Great War (WWI) was the reason he lost his post as Liberal party agent. William lost the post a year after the outbreak of the Great War. States it takes more than war to bring politics to the ground, and with so many men serving in the war, Wallace would in fact have been ideal to keep the party organization in being until peace returned... As soon as he lost his post he was succeeded by a Mr. A. Cotterill. She believes he lost his post for personal reasons, not circumstance... Goes on that it's odd they were the party in power but did not find him a post in one of the ministried being set up in connection with the war effort.

                    . After marrying Julia, William's father Benjamin had a stroke in the house about a year after. He was so unwell he had to sign his will by a mark rather than a signature. He then died 10 days later at a workhouse infirmary at Knaresborough. His estate was to be shared equally between William and Jessie, with Jessie as executor.

                    She finds it particularly disgraceful that William removed his dying father to meet his end in a workhouse infirmary, with an exclamation point to show her disgust.

                    . Finds it odd his father, a registered householder at 9 Belmont Road until a year before his death, died in possession of no more than £56 from six industrial life insurance policies. She suggests this is because he lost a lot of money to William's debts. No evidence he was in any kind of debt is given however.

                    ---

                    On Julia Wallace and her background:

                    . Says she came from a somewhat higher social class than her husband.

                    . While living independently at 11 St. Mary's Avenue, Harrogate, she apparently sang at concerts, and invited friends over for musical evenings, as well as accompanying them to plays and concerts, and on sketching expeditions to beauty spots in the surrounding countryside. She also attended the parish church regularly and took an active part in parochial affairs.

                    .* She registered her name on the Burgess Roll (maybe this could be used to confirm her identity and birth certificate). In 1911 when she first meets William, the burgess roll reads Julia Dennis, then again in 1912. It does NOT appear in 1913. And in 1914 the name "Wallace" is substituted, without any first name or even initial.

                    Speculates the reasoning it did not appear in 1913 was because she was expecting to be married, and that the vague name in 1914 is potentially used because Julia was in the process of transferring the home by deed to William, the man she was going to marry and did on the 24th of March that year. Because William lost his post, Yseult speculates upon whether Julia's capital vanished as a result of his debts.

                    . In regards to the wedding she thinks is odd that there was no formal announcement or report of the marriage in the local press. Especially since she says Julia had a wide circle of friends, took an active role in church affairs, etc.

                    . The couple stayed in Julia's fancy home. William brought his father and sister to live with them, and their tenancy at 9 Belmont Road was relinquished. She also thinks this is strange for some reason, that Benjamin should give up tenancy when he had Jessie there to help look after him.

                    . Challenges author John Rowland's belief Julia was named Julia Thorpe, and states it as being Julia Dennis. Says it appears she was the only daughter of a veterinary surgeon.

                    ---

                    Life Together in Liverpool:

                    . William was employed by the Prudential and was placed in charge of the district of Clubmoor. Apparently an agency often given to juniour agents. As we know he was never promoted from this supposedly meager position. Yseult suggests it's because his demeanour made him unlikeable, and that a higher up agent should possess personable qualities... She says that this treadmill of lowly work must have felt like purgatory for an intelligent man like Wallace.

                    . States that once taking up residency at 29 Wolverton Street, no one but Julia and William ever crossed the threshold of No. 29.

                    . Argues that William's isolation was not necessarily by choice. Emphasizes he did not join the chess club until 1923, and did not lecture in chemistry until even later. Quotes Rowland that Wallace was "an aloof, slightly priggish man".

                    . Says William made no attempt to disguise his disdain for his fellow-man's preoccupations with things such as the events of the racing calendar, cricket, and football fixtures, and despised their robust, commonplace geniality.

                    . Police investigations revealed Clubmoor residents found William to be "surly" (bad-tempered/grumpy).

                    . Says Julia, as an artistic woman, must have hated living in the drab Anfield area compared to her extravagent property in Harrogate.

                    . William attended chess not only on Mondays, but occasionally on the Thursdays too (Thursday being the night Parry's drama club met at the same cafe). I say this because if how it sounds is true, it appears it was not a one off occurence when he went there one Thursday and saw Parry there just one time, but would have probably been on multiple occasions.

                    . Julia continued to wear the same style of clothing as she had worn when she married William, despite the fashion of the time changing.

                    . Mentions the undergarments Julia was found wearing. Does not say they were for incontinence. Does mention the "pathetic" thirty shillings sewn into the corset. Suggests the undergarments were of poor quality because Julia was terrible at sewing and had made them herself out of the cheapest material.

                    . Accentuates how sad it is that she was so feeble at the age of 52 (Age disputed as being actually 69).

                    . Implies Julia wanted a social circle but was disallowed by William. She says in Liverpool Julia moved in no artistic circles, went on no sketching expeditions, and attended no concerts with her friends. She had no friends. Members of the local church said they would have liked to have been on friendly terms with Julia and she was always ready for a chat after service. But then she would "return to Wolverton Street like a hermit to a cell."

                    . Implies William's "we were sufficient in ourselves" was a view he himself held and FORCED upon his unwilling wife.

                    . States Mrs. Johnston "fell to her knees" when seeing the body, exclaiming "oh you poor darling!" (would like corroboration from the Holme family on there being obvious noise during the discovery).

                    . Claims Mr. Crewe was William closest friend. (I would argue it may have been James Caird who he formed the chess club with).

                    ---

                    The Telephone Call

                    . Yseult states the 19th of January was the first contest match Wallace was down to play. But she also makes a point of the fact Wallace had not attended meetings for the past fortnight and Beattie was uncertain that he would turn up and thus had already found a replacement for him. So I think she might mean that it WOULD be the first one IF he turned up? (Would like corroboration).

                    . Important: Claims that an engineer, Leslie Heaton, inspected the phone box and "he had found a fault in the mechanism which he had corrected."

                    . Important: This excerpt appears in here but I do not believe it is in the trial book by Wyndham Brown:

                    Hemmerde (to Beattie): The name Qualtrough was spelt out to you over the telephone; did you spell it out to the accused?

                    Beattie: No.

                    Hemmerde: So, althought it was such an uncommon name, and Wallace protested "I don't know the chap", he knew how to spell his name?
                    . Important: Seems to confirm the fact in the magazine that chess club member Deyes not only said he knew of Menlove Gardens, but, relayed to Wallace by Beattie, that he "knows Menlove Gardens North, South, and West, but has never heard of Menlove Gardens East. He knows the district well and says it is not the sort of place to be knocking about in after dark."

                    . The other member who journeyed home with Caird and William was a man named Bethurn.

                    ---

                    Next Chapter Explored: "Tuesday, 20th January 1931"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Interlude for Detective Team:

                      It's Yseult Bridges who claims Julia was "Julia Dennis" and that Rowland was wrong about "Julia Thorpe"... However, if her mother had remarried, or indeed if JULIA had been married before and been divorced, her birth certificate might say Julia Thorpe (or some other surname). So I am eager to get the investigation squad on this case.

                      The "uneducated farm-girl with poor parents" does not match with that mansion looking home she owned and lived in alone.

                      Anyone who can, start looking for Julia Thorpe in the birth records. I do not know where or how to access them.

                      Addendum: In post #9: (https://forum.casebook.org/forum/soc...001#post724001), when I said he played McCartney because it had turned 7.45 and Beattie assumed "he" wasn't turning up. The "he" I meant is F. C. Chandler. Sorry for that vital error.
                      Last edited by WallaceWackedHer; 10-06-2019, 05:05 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by WallaceWackedHer View Post
                        Interlude for Detective Team:

                        It's Yseult Bridges who claims Julia was "Julia Dennis" and that Rowland was wrong about "Julia Thorpe"... However, if her mother had remarried, or indeed if JULIA had been married before and been divorced, her birth certificate might say Julia Thorpe (or some other surname). So I am eager to get the investigation squad on this case.
                        Not that it makes a lot of difference WWH, and I don't know if this has been mentioned anywhere previously, but it's interesting nevertheless, to note that Julia shortened her real Christian name from Juliana to Julia at some point before she was registered as a 19 year old assistant Governess in the 1881 Census. Attached is a digital copy of the 1871 Census...... Click image for larger version

Name:	Juliana Dennis entry in 1871 Census.jpg
Views:	697
Size:	164.4 KB
ID:	724315

                        *************************************
                        "A body of men, HOLDING THEMSELVES ACCOUNTABLE TO NOBODY, ought not to be trusted by anybody." --Thomas Paine ["Rights of Man"]

                        "Justice is an ideal which transcends the expedience of the State, or the sensitivities of Government officials, or private individuals. IT HAS TO BE PURSUED WHATEVER THE COST IN PEACE OF MIND TO THOSE CONCERNED." --'Justice of the Peace' [July 12th 1975]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=WallaceWackedHer;n723991][B]
                          Photos of the toilet and sink. That cannot be a blood mark on the tap or no doubt that would be brought up I'm sure. Not sure why there is newspaper on the floor by the toilet:

                          https://i.imgur.com/UkYg7lA.png

                          https://i.imgur.com/fn6hUT7.png


                          Newspaper was often used as a substitute for toilet paper WWH in those days and even a few decades later.


                          *************************************
                          "A body of men, HOLDING THEMSELVES ACCOUNTABLE TO NOBODY, ought not to be trusted by anybody." --Thomas Paine ["Rights of Man"]

                          "Justice is an ideal which transcends the expedience of the State, or the sensitivities of Government officials, or private individuals. IT HAS TO BE PURSUED WHATEVER THE COST IN PEACE OF MIND TO THOSE CONCERNED." --'Justice of the Peace' [July 12th 1975]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=Sherlock Houses;n724323]
                            Originally posted by WallaceWackedHer View Post
                            [B]
                            Photos of the toilet and sink. That cannot be a blood mark on the tap or no doubt that would be brought up I'm sure. Not sure why there is newspaper on the floor by the toilet:

                            https://i.imgur.com/UkYg7lA.png

                            https://i.imgur.com/fn6hUT7.png
                            Newspaper was often used as a substitute for toilet paper WWH in those days and even a few decades later.
                            *************************************
                            "A body of men, HOLDING THEMSELVES ACCOUNTABLE TO NOBODY, ought not to be trusted by anybody." --Thomas Paine ["Rights of Man"]

                            "Justice is an ideal which transcends the expedience of the State, or the sensitivities of Government officials, or private individuals. IT HAS TO BE PURSUED WHATEVER THE COST IN PEACE OF MIND TO THOSE CONCERNED." --'Justice of the Peace' [July 12th 1975]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=Sherlock Houses;n724324]
                              Originally posted by Sherlock Houses View Post

                              Newspaper was often used as a substitute for toilet paper WWH in those days and even a few decades later.
                              More than a few decades. My grandparents had squares of cut newspaper hanging on a piece of string on the door of their outside toilet in the early 1970s.
                              Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                              "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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