Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Move to Murder: Who Killed Julia Wallace?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by moste View Post
    Apparently, I read it somewhere , and
    Rod if I get the gist has her making that statement in court, If she did I just think she may have wanted the jury to perceive what a wonderfully compassionate woman this is. My point is , If her hand was warm ,then she couldn’t have been dead for two hours as Macfall reported.This in turn blows the idea that Wallace killed his wife before he left for Menlove gardens, Since I believe Wallace to be guilty, he must have done it about 8 15 / 20 ish.
    ok thanks for clarifying. Yes I agree- I too would find it hard to believe her hand would still be warm if shes been dead for two hours-especially in a cold part of the house.

    Does anyone know if its on the official record that Mrs. Johnston states her hand was warm?
    did any of the police or doctors say anything similar?
    "Is all that we see or seem
    but a dream within a dream?"

    -Edgar Allan Poe


    "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
    quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

    -Frederick G. Abberline

    Comment


    • The ambient temperature in Liverpool that evening was about 5.6C. [42F]
      Mrs. Johnston held Julia's hand, and when asked by her husband if Julia was cold, answered "No".

      Some information on rigor mortis...
      If the body feels warm and flaccid - Dead less than 3 hours
      https://juniperpublishers.com/jfsci/....ID.555771.pdf

      Cold tends to slow rigor, heat to speed it up.
      Last edited by RodCrosby; 12-12-2018, 04:12 PM.
      "I make a point of never having any prejudices, and of following docilely where fact may lead me..."
      Sherlock Holmes, in The Adventure of The Reigate Squires
      The Accomplice Theory - 'on balance, the best explanation for one of the most puzzling murder cases in British criminal history' - Move to Murder, 2018
      https://www.dropbox.com/s/s0jpn0kyuq...heory.pdf?dl=0

      Compendium of Resources
      https://forum.casebook.org/forum/soc...882#post650882

      Comment


      • Abby,
        What about the fire?Julia lights the fire,what would that signify?

        Comment


        • Originally posted by RodCrosby View Post
          with party walls...
          No party wall cavity in 1931, quite so. So what we must do is substitute party wall with exterior wall ,back or front . This makes for a little more effort, as it would be necessary to slide on your belly to the top plate where roof meets top of wall , loosen and temporarily remove top brick ( prepared in readiness) you now have access to cavity

          Comment


          • Originally posted by RodCrosby View Post
            The ambient temperature in Liverpool that evening was about 5.6C. [42F]
            Mrs. Johnston held Julia's hand, and when asked by her husband if Julia was cold, answered "No".

            Some information on rigor mortis...
            If the body feels warm and flaccid - Dead less than 3 hours
            https://juniperpublishers.com/jfsci/....ID.555771.pdf

            Cold tends to slow rigor, heat to speed it up.
            Thanks rod
            I think her hand would have felt cold had she been murdered two hours or more earlier.
            "Is all that we see or seem
            but a dream within a dream?"

            -Edgar Allan Poe


            "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
            quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

            -Frederick G. Abberline

            Comment


            • What difference does ambient outside temperature make if she’s indoors with a fire on?

              Comment


              • So Mrs. Johnston held Julia's hand shortly after 8.45pm.

                What conclusion do you draw?
                "I make a point of never having any prejudices, and of following docilely where fact may lead me..."
                Sherlock Holmes, in The Adventure of The Reigate Squires
                The Accomplice Theory - 'on balance, the best explanation for one of the most puzzling murder cases in British criminal history' - Move to Murder, 2018
                https://www.dropbox.com/s/s0jpn0kyuq...heory.pdf?dl=0

                Compendium of Resources
                https://forum.casebook.org/forum/soc...882#post650882

                Comment


                • Originally posted by harry View Post
                  Abby,
                  What about the fire?Julia lights the fire,what would that signify?
                  To me it fits the scenario of letting someone in, bringing them to the parlor, the cold part of the house, and lighting the fire because its cold.

                  Her throwing on his mac also fits with this scenario. As does the burnt bottom of the mac and her skirt, as this IMHO is when she was attacked...right after starting the fire.
                  "Is all that we see or seem
                  but a dream within a dream?"

                  -Edgar Allan Poe


                  "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                  quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                  -Frederick G. Abberline

                  Comment


                  • Thinking about Wallace and trying to open the door before he met the Johnston's, I was struck by Mrs Johnston's evidence, below:

                    A little later there was a knock at the door, I under-
                    stand ? — Yes.

                    Did you try to open the door ? — Yes.

                    Were you able to ?— No ; it is a different lock to mine,
                    and I think I was agitated, and I drew back and let Mr.
                    Wallace open it.

                    And the police constable came in ? — ^Yes.


                    I wonder if this helps us accept that the door was not so easy to open and Wallace may well have had some initial problems trying to open the door.

                    Comment


                    • The fire was OFF.
                      "I make a point of never having any prejudices, and of following docilely where fact may lead me..."
                      Sherlock Holmes, in The Adventure of The Reigate Squires
                      The Accomplice Theory - 'on balance, the best explanation for one of the most puzzling murder cases in British criminal history' - Move to Murder, 2018
                      https://www.dropbox.com/s/s0jpn0kyuq...heory.pdf?dl=0

                      Compendium of Resources
                      https://forum.casebook.org/forum/soc...882#post650882

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by etenguy View Post
                        Thinking about Wallace and trying to open the door before he met the Johnston's, I was struck by Mrs Johnston's evidence, below:

                        A little later there was a knock at the door, I under-
                        stand ? — Yes.

                        Did you try to open the door ? — Yes.

                        Were you able to ?— No ; it is a different lock to mine,
                        and I think I was agitated, and I drew back and let Mr.
                        Wallace open it.

                        And the police constable came in ? — ^Yes.


                        I wonder if this helps us accept that the door was not so easy to open and Wallace may well have had some initial problems trying to open the door.
                        I think we've all had problems with locks in times of stress...
                        "I make a point of never having any prejudices, and of following docilely where fact may lead me..."
                        Sherlock Holmes, in The Adventure of The Reigate Squires
                        The Accomplice Theory - 'on balance, the best explanation for one of the most puzzling murder cases in British criminal history' - Move to Murder, 2018
                        https://www.dropbox.com/s/s0jpn0kyuq...heory.pdf?dl=0

                        Compendium of Resources
                        https://forum.casebook.org/forum/soc...882#post650882

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by moste View Post
                          What difference does ambient outside temperature make if she’s indoors with a fire on?
                          Because its cold in the part of the house where she dosnt have a fire on, in a room where it was only on for a breif amount of time, before it was quickly turned back off?
                          "Is all that we see or seem
                          but a dream within a dream?"

                          -Edgar Allan Poe


                          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                          -Frederick G. Abberline

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by RodCrosby View Post
                            The fire was OFF.
                            Yes I think Wallace turned it off didn’t he?

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by etenguy View Post
                              Thinking about Wallace and trying to open the door before he met the Johnston's, I was struck by Mrs Johnston's evidence, below:

                              A little later there was a knock at the door, I under-
                              stand ? — Yes.

                              Did you try to open the door ? — Yes.

                              Were you able to ?— No ; it is a different lock to mine,
                              and I think I was agitated, and I drew back and let Mr.
                              Wallace open it.

                              And the police constable came in ? — ^Yes.


                              I wonder if this helps us accept that the door was not so easy to open and Wallace may well have had some initial problems trying to open the door.
                              I really dont have a problem with wallace having difficulty opening the doors, i do have a problem that as soon as the johnstons show up..bam no problem and hes in.
                              "Is all that we see or seem
                              but a dream within a dream?"

                              -Edgar Allan Poe


                              "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                              quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                              -Frederick G. Abberline

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by moste View Post
                                Yes I think Wallace turned it off didn’t he?
                                No, It was off when he arrived back
                                "Is all that we see or seem
                                but a dream within a dream?"

                                -Edgar Allan Poe


                                "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                                quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                                -Frederick G. Abberline

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X