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  • Monty
    started a topic Earlist recorded sound.

    Earlist recorded sound.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7318180.stm

    Phil Hutchinson singing Au Clare de la lune apparently. 1860.

    Monty


    PS Earliest, before any of the spelling Fuzz start.
    Last edited by Monty; 03-28-2008, 03:04 PM. Reason: Cant spel nuffink

  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    Interesting stuff, Philip. At least Henry Irving can now be removed from the list of suspects!

    You may be interested to know that two artistes from the original run of 'Yeomen of the Guard' made recordings:- Richard Temple, who played Sergeant Meryll, and Courtice Pounds who played Colonel Fairfax.

    Pounds' recordings date from around 1915, and famously include a few numbers from 'Chu Chin Chow'. Unfortunately, I have only one of these. Temple fared less well in the recording studio, and only recorded four sides. Two of these are G&S numbers (from 'Mikado' & 'Pirates of Penzance'), Non piu andrai (in English) from 'Marriage of Figaro', and 'I am a Friar of Orders Grey', a popular song of the time. His entire output was recorded around 1902/3.

    If you (or anyone) would like to hear these and others from my collection, I would be more than willing to put them on a cassette tape for you.

    Steve

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  • George Hutchinson
    replied
    No one's posted on this for some time but I spent a few hours doing some real old-school web surfing last night and had an amazing time.

    The stories about the traces on the sooted paper are all true. It's not a hoax. It's fully documented, in scientific and historical detail, on all the major websites on early recorded sound.

    The actual clip is downloadable. It dates from 1860! Ten seconds of very, very lo-fi (little more than pitch is detectable) singing. There's even a recording from 1857 but none of that is discernable.

    On other sites, I downloaded the full Crystal Palace recording from June 1888 - it's in several sections and in total runs to a good eight minutes. I also have a recording of Big Ben from 1890, Frank Lambert making a voice recording in 1877 (the year Edison made his lost 'Mary Had A Little Lamb' recording on different equipment), the sound (just) of a train in an urban US area in 1874... it's been staggering. However, the quality is almost non-existant.

    One thing I did also note is that there is a UK recording (I forget who of - it might be Henry Irving) from THE ACTUAL DAY POLLY NICHOLS WAS MURDERED. I haven't traced it yet, but it exists.

    If anyone wants links to these sites, ask away. I've been absolutely fascinated.

    PHILIP

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  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    As an afterthought, here is a link to the recorded voice of Florence Nightingale:-

    http://catalogue.wellcome.ac.uk/sear...0&FF=&1,0,,0,0

    This one can be saved to hard drive if required.

    Steve

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  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    Possibly, but nowhere near as musical.

    Steve

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Thoroughgood View Post
    Hi, Sam,

    You forgot the loud, piercing scream which followed.

    Plus the blue language!
    ...Danube, surely?

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    Hi, Sam,

    You forgot the loud, piercing scream which followed.

    Plus the blue language!

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Hi Steve,
    Originally posted by Steve Thoroughgood View Post
    It came to grief after I got married 25 years ago when the new Mrs T. dropped it on the floor. I never did get to hear how it sounded!
    Have you asked Mrs T? My guess is that it went something like "thud, bang, pop!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    Since I never had the means to play wax cylinders, I retained only one in my collection of recorded ephemera. It was a four minute compilation of Strauss waltzes, (rather like a four minute compilation of the best bits from Wagner's ring cycle!).

    It came to grief after I got married 25 years ago when the new Mrs T. dropped it on the floor. I never did get to hear how it sounded!

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • j.r-ahde
    replied
    Hello you all!

    Wow, people talking about the earliest recordings here!

    Since I only noticed this thread now, I will add this thing on the "better late than never" -basis:

    On a documentary about Houdini there was a recording about him talking about his methods! It was this same wax-thing, that was used with Florence Nightingale, etc.

    All the best
    Jukka

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Thoroughgood
    replied
    Thank you very much for your welcomes, everyone.

    I have to confess to being something of a Gilbert & Sullivan 'buff', both as listener and erstwhile (semi-pro) performer. My interest dates back to 1970, the first year in which I saw a performance of 'The Mikado' by the original D'Oyly Carte Company. I have been collecting G&S records for over thirty years, and have a number of rare 78s in my collection (including a few deemed not worthy enough to appear on the various compilation discs of the '70s & '80s). Unfortunately, I don't possess very much on CD, mainly because I strongly object to the sky-high prices charged by Decca for recordings made 40 - 50 years ago!

    The Sullivan dubbing, unfortunately, is on good old vinyl, and I don't (yet) possess the correct equipment in order to transfer it to CD. Nevertheless, the link supplied by aspallek should serve well in the meantime, or until such time I can master the complexities of modern technology.

    Philip (great guy!) mentioned my set of Ripper Walk photos posted to flickr: anyone interested in seeing them should be able to find them via this link:-

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/andytak...7604078162902/

    Personally, I don't think they're all that good, attributable to having been shot on poor quality film in the first place, plus my failing eyesight (I'm no spring chicken!). However, all photos are devoid of people and moving traffic, something of an accomplishment, I feel!

    Steve
    Last edited by Steve Thoroughgood; 04-21-2008, 05:59 PM. Reason: Poor grammar!

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  • aspallek
    replied
    Did you know that the alarm was first sounded by local resident Henry Buckland that the Palace was afire on 30 November 1936? He and his daughter Crystal (named for the Palace) were out walking their dog and either noticed the fire or were alerted by someone who had.

    Leave a comment:


  • George Hutchinson
    replied
    Billy Crystal?

    Crystal Gayle?

    PHILIP

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  • aspallek
    replied
    Here you are, Steve. The Sullivan recording is at http://cylindersontheweb.angelcities...-Oct-1888).ram

    Other recordings of famous persons from that same evening (Oct. 5, 1888) as well as other noted rare recordings, including the world's oldest playable recording (1878) and a portion of the Handel concert can be found at http://cylindersontheweb.angelcities...recordings.htm

    The Handel Festival is barely audible despite the chorus being 4000-strong. It is the most audible portion of the extant recording, however. Recorded June 29, 1888 at Crystal Palace. Who might have been there?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Hi Steve, and welcome
    Originally posted by Steve Thoroughgood View Post
    one of the earliest spoken word recordings made in England was by Sir Arthur Sullivan on 5 October 1888, two days after the opening of The Yeomen of the Guard.

    Sullivan's message was recorded as follows:-

    "Dear Mr. Edison,

    For myself I can only say that I am astonished and somewhat... terrified at the thought that so much hideous and bad music will be put on record forever..."
    Prophetic words!

    Leave a comment:

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