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  • 31st August = Bank Holiday?

    I read somewhere, August 31st was a bank holiday, but that was a source which got several other things wrong.
    Can somebody help me, please?

  • #2
    "Bank holiday" is a term that has always confused me too, K. One assumes that it's a day when the banks are closed, so it might well include days such as Christmas and New Year's Day. From what I've read, though, they seem to fall on Mondays and usually during the warmer months. So a bank holiday on a Friday in 1888 seems unlikely; but wait a bit and a knowledgeable UK poster will drop by with the definitive answer.

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    • #3
      I found this piece of information:

      Bank holidays were first introduced by the Bank Holidays Act of 1871, which designated four holidays in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and five in Scotland. These were Easter Monday, the first Monday in August, the 26th December, and Whit Monday (England, Wales and Northern Ireland)
      http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...page18882.html

      Did it happen for any other reason to be a day of significance?
      Like Nov. 9th, which was no bank holiday, but the day of Lord Mayor's Show?

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      • #4
        Interesting, because Dec. 26th is also Boxing Day.

        Yours truly,

        Tom Wescott

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        • #5
          Emma Smith and Tabram were both killed on a Bank holiday, so I'm guessing April 3rd, when Smith was killed, was the day after Easter. No clue what Whit Monday is.

          Yours truly,

          Tom Wescott

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          • #6
            I think it must be confused with Martha Tabram's death, as that was a Bank Holiday Monday - and, according to Sugden's "Complete History", the last holiday for the summer.

            It's always been an interesting, and I believe under-rated, point that all the canonical killings and even a couple of the attacks outside the canon, including that of Tabram, occurred on holidays or weekends.

            One could call this a coincidence a couple of times, but when it gets into the region of 6 or 7, surely it's a bit more than that - IMO, it indicates that Jack was occupied during the working week, perhaps indicating he held down some sort of regular employment, as opposed to the popular image of him being an insane vagabond who did nothing but roam the streets searching for his next victim.

            Cheers,
            Adam.

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            • #7
              Hi Adam. The seamen theory derives almost exclusively from the fact that so many of the murders were on holidays and weekends, so I wouldn't say it's overlooked. However, these would also be prime times for a killer such as the Ripper, because he'd have a much easier time finding a woman, as they'd be out in droves. But it might indeed be work related on the part of the killer. With that in mind, how many hardpressed east enders would actually have had the weekends off? Not many.

              Also of interest is that all the murders, from Smith to Kelly, occurred either in the first part or last part of the month, none in the middle. Not sure how or why that would be significant, just thought I'd mention it.

              Yours truly,

              Tom Wescott

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Adam Went View Post
                IMO, it indicates that Jack was occupied during the working week, perhaps indicating he held down some sort of regular employment, as opposed to the popular image of him being an insane vagabond who did nothing but roam the streets searching for his next victim.
                Agree that the crime dates could be seen as an indication that the killer might have been holding a job during the week.

                Originally posted by Tom_Wescott View Post
                With that in mind, how many hardpressed east enders would actually have had the weekends off? Not many.
                If not completely having hitted bottom, the Victorian low classes were notorious for celebrating on the weekends by getting seriously hammered. Maybe not for the likes of Nichols and Chapman, but Eddowes and MJK did party when they could afford it. Plus almost everyone was an alcoholic in Victorian Whitechapel.

                Originally posted by Tom_Wescott View Post
                Also of interest is that all the murders, from Smith to Kelly, occurred either in the first part or last part of the month, none in the middle. Not sure how or why that would be significant, just thought I'd mention it.
                Actually, I've noticed this myself and I was thinking that it might be related to
                - the killer getting payed in the end or in the beginning of the month
                - the simple fact that he started killing on the end of the month and his urges for another go growed accordingly.
                Noticeable is the longer gap after Chapman, which led to the Double Event, and the longer gap between the Double Event and MJK vs. the minimal waiting time between Nichols and Chapman. The latter can be understood as “newbie enthusiasm“ while it can be argued that after Chapman and the huge attention this crime got, he became more careful. There's also a huge gap between Emma Smith and Tabram, which can be explained by the fact that he hadn't started doing this solo yet.
                Best regards,
                Maria

                Comment


                • #9
                  Maybe this will help.

                  http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/...1888&country=9

                  Bank holidays all stemmed from the numerous holidays and festivals celerbarted throughout the years which were consolidated into 4 handy holidays where the Banks closed for those days.

                  With the banks closed, the majority of trading ceased, though pubs have a bumper day.

                  It must be remembered that Saturdays and Sundays are religious days for the two predominant religions in the area, some traded, some did not. However the timing of the crimes, I feel, is more victim orientated.

                  Monty




                  Author of Capturing Jack the Ripper.

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1445621622

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re pay

                    The average Victorian either got paid weekly or daily, I do not recall seeing any reference to monthly payments.

                    That is a more modern thing tied in with computer banking.

                    Monty




                    Author of Capturing Jack the Ripper.

                    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1445621622

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nichols was killed in the early hours of Friday, as was Kelly, so I feel the weekend angle is a red herring.

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                      • #12
                        church calendar

                        Hello Tom. Whit Monday is the day after Whitsun--the "Day of Pentecost." It is a church calendar entity. The week after that Sunday is usually referred to as Whitsuntide.

                        If you like, I can send a copy of the annual church calendar. A bit complex but informative.

                        Cheers.
                        LC

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Adam Went View Post
                          I think it must be confused with Martha Tabram's death
                          Agree.


                          Originally posted by Adam Went View Post
                          ... that all the canonical killings and even a couple of the attacks outside the canon, including that of Tabram, occurred on holidays or weekends.
                          Probably on weekends and holidays happened a lot more violence than on other days anyway, for the reasons named in this thread. People had the money and the time to get drunk.

                          That does not have to indicate the non-canonical attacks were also Ripper work, but just that 'Jack' was not the only one who had the weekend off.


                          So the 31st of August most likely was not a day off work. At least for the majority. It is still possible 'Jack' did not have to work then, for what reasons ever. Or was tough enough to go without sleep the one or other night.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Robert View Post
                            Nichols was killed in the early hours of Friday, as was Kelly, so I feel the weekend angle is a red herring.
                            Kelly was killed on the day of Lord Mayor's Show. As far as I know, not all, but at least a lot of people were off work then.

                            If not the theory is true 'Jack' chose this day to get the most attention.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by K-453
                              Kelly was killed on the day of Lord Mayor's Show. As far as I know, not all, but at least a lot of people were off work then.

                              If not the theory is true 'Jack' chose this day to get the most attention.
                              Quite possible. Another possibility is that he chose the one day that month when the police would be otherwise occupied.

                              Originally posted by lynn cates
                              Hello Tom. Whit Monday is the day after Whitsun--the "Day of Pentecost." It is a church calendar entity. The week after that Sunday is usually referred to as Whitsuntide.

                              If you like, I can send a copy of the annual church calendar. A bit complex but informative.
                              Hi Lynn, thanks for that. I think you answered my question.

                              Yours truly,

                              Tom Wescott

                              Comment

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