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The reputation of Sir William Withey Gull

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  • #16
    Originally posted by JTRSickert View Post
    Hello, I just want to point out that a major consequence of the whole Royal Family/Freemasonic conspiracy theory is that it tarnished the image and reputation of an extraordinary medical man, William Withey Gull. Excuse me, SIR William Withey Gull. Due to Stephen Knight's book, Alan Moore's graphic novel, the 1988 BBC miniseries, and the 2001 "From Hell" motion picture, most people today remember Gull as being a Jack the Ripper suspect, rather than his enormous contributions to medical science. His medical research led to the classification of hypothyroidism as well papers on cholera, rheumatic fever, and paraplegia. He was a surgeon for the bladder-stone operation of Emperor Napoleon III, even though the Emperor died. So, I think Gull should be remembered more for his brillance in the medical field. The man was knighted, for God's sake!!!! He was not being driven inside a coach by John Netley and slashing up prostitutes when the man was in his 70s and had a stroke the year before.

    I wonder if any of Gull's surviving descendants (if there are any) have made any statements or tried to file lawsuits against his accusers. I would if I was a descendant.
    I am related to Sir William Gull. He is my great, great Uncle. I am descended from his sister Elizabeth Mary Ann Gull who was married to Joseph Haddon Johnson.
    It is interesting to read about him. Our family had handed the "Gull" name down until he was a suspect in the Ripper case ! It then ceased to become a middle name! I didn't realise until the other day that he attended Napoleon the 3rd at one stage. There is a lovely etching of this.
    Would love to make contact with Allen Chilver if he is on the forum again. To find family is exciting.
    I am an Australian leg of the family!

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    • #17
      Hi Lyn
      Welcome and it is a pleasure to have you here. Once again, I am deeply honored to be addressing a member of Sir William Gull's family and I am gld that both you and Allen have made your own contributions to this forum. It would be nice if both of you did find the time to talk amongst yourselves. In the meantime, take care and hope to hear from you again.
      I won't make any deals. I've resigned. I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed,de-briefed, or numbered!

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      • #18
        Thank you so much for your welcome!
        I stumbled upon the site quite by accident, but have already enjoyed reading up on people's contributions. I will certainly be a keen member!
        I too have been concerned about the rapid deterioration of Sir William Gull's monument, and find it quite surprising that it has been allowed to deteriorate to the extent it has. I too would be willing to do my bit in helping to restore it.

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        • #19
          Hi lyn,

          thank you again for making an appearance. I'm sure if Allen comes back on, he'll be delighted to hear your enthusiasm for restoring the monument.More than anything though, I hope this little forum can help restore Sir William's true reason for being a distinguished gentleman. As I have said, I believe he's more recognized now as being a Ripper suspect than for his significant medical accomplishments. Since we all know the Royal Conspiracy theory is dead i nthe water, we should try to salvage the reputation of this noble British man he gave everything for Queen and Country.
          I won't make any deals. I've resigned. I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed,de-briefed, or numbered!

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          • #20
            I read this on a Jane Seymour fan site about the Jack the Ripper movie


            "Commentary by Jonathan Sothcott of Sothcott Films:

            Ultimately, there was nothing decisive in the files, but a suspect was already beginning to emerge: Sir William Withey Gull, the physician-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria. Gull, who had suffered a minor stroke in 1897, fitted the bill in terms of influence and medical knowledge; he had been known to wave bloody human hearts around at dinner parties, suggesting that, perhaps, he wasn't all there."

            Has anyone heard this before???

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            • #21
              Even if it is true (which I highly doubt), acting strangely after having a stroke is hardly proof of committing horrible murders on women.
              I won't make any deals. I've resigned. I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed,de-briefed, or numbered!

              Comment


              • #22
                Well, gman992!

                I wonder, if he would have been begging of being caught...

                All the best
                Jukka
                "When I know all about everything, I am old. And it's a very, very long way to go!"

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Gman992 View Post
                  I read this on a Jane Seymour fan site about the Jack the Ripper movie


                  "Commentary by Jonathan Sothcott of Sothcott Films:

                  Ultimately, there was nothing decisive in the files, but a suspect was already beginning to emerge: Sir William Withey Gull, the physician-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria. Gull, who had suffered a minor stroke in 1897, fitted the bill in terms of influence and medical knowledge; he had been known to wave bloody human hearts around at dinner parties, suggesting that, perhaps, he wasn't all there."

                  Has anyone heard this before???

                  Part of this is true and part of it is nonsense.

                  The true part is evidenced by this testimony from one Colonel Dunham, who describes this episode from a dinner party:

                  He then invited us into his office where he illustrated his lecture so to speak. One side of this room was entirely occupied with cases, outwardly resembling wardrobes. When the doors were opened quite a museum was revealed -- tiers of shelves with glass jars and cases, some round and others square, filled with all sorts of anatomical specimens. The ‘doctor’ placed on a table a dozen or more jars containing, as he said, the matrices (uteri) of every class of women. Nearly a half of one of these cases was occupied exclusively with these specimens.

                  The nonsense part is that the doctor was Francis Tumblety and not William Gull. You can read the full story on this site here.

                  The original article by Jonathan Sothcott, which you can read here, has several similar mistakes, not least the statement that Gull suffered a stroke in 1897 (7 years after his death).

                  All of which goes to show how frighteningly easy it is to make a careless and untrue statement on the Internet which is quickly accepted by others as fact.

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                  • #24
                    i dont know how bad gulls stroke was but a lot of stroke victems are lucky if they can hold a knife let alone use one

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                    • #25
                      Also, given the state of medical knowledge back then, I'm sure that--as much as they knew about what caused strokes--treatments would've been bloodcurling, let alone non-exsistent. With today's medicine, 90-95% recovery from a stroke is possible.

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                      • #26
                        Gull was suspected of being the ripper well before knights books and the bbc mini series , why wouldn't he be considered a suspect . A minor stroke and 70 years old doesn't remove him from be more than capable of murder.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by FISHY1118 View Post
                          Gull was suspected of being the ripper well before knights books and the bbc mini series , why wouldn't he be considered a suspect . A minor stroke and 70 years old doesn't remove him from be more than capable of murder.

                          Jack The Zimmer?

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                          • #28

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by FISHY1118 View Post
                              Gull was suspected of being the ripper well before knights books and the bbc mini series , why wouldn't he be considered a suspect . A minor stroke and 70 years old doesn't remove him from be more than capable of murder.
                              Can you point to some evidence to back this up? Would be interested to hear more.

                              Tristan

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                              • #30
                                Yes , if theres one chapter of knights book The Final Solution that i would encourage anyone to read, its the chapter simply titled ''GULL'', enough said

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