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  • Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
    Ah, so you’ve established what kind of van he was driving. And what load he was carrying.

    Very impressive.
    Perhaps you should read what I actually wrote. I made no attempt to establish what load Charles Lechmere was carrying on any given day. My point was that we cannot know what Charles Lechmere was carrying on any given day.

    "From what I can find, the standard for Pickford's was "Each team of horses takes out for delivery, and returns with, two loads of goods daily" and "a full three-horse-van carries between four and five tons". At the time, Pickford's appears to have transported goods for both businesses and individuals. There certainly would be regular bulk shipments to and from large firms, but even those wouldn't necessarily be the same size or be shipped every day. Smaller firms and individuals would be even more irregular in the size and frequency of their shipments."

    "The nearest Market appears to have been Spitalfield's Market (fruit, vegetables, flowers), though plenty of other things were available there as well. And there were plenty of business outside the Markets. A period source notes "All day long and all the year round there is a constant Fair going on in Whitechapel Road. It is held upon the broad pavement, which was benevolently intended, no doubt, for this purpose. Here are displayed all kinds of things; bits of second-hand furniture, such as the head of a wooden bed, whose griminess is perhaps exaggerated, in order that a purchaser may expect something extraordinarily cheap. Here are lids of pots and saucepans laid out, to show that in the warehouse, of which these things are specimens, will be found the principal parts of the utensils for sale; here are unexpected things, such as rows of skates, sold cheap in summer, light clothing in winter; workmen’s tools of every kind, including, perhaps, the burglarious jemmy; second-hand books – a miscellaneous collection, establishing the fact that the readers of books in Whitechapel – a feeble and scanty folk – read nothing at all except sermons and meditations among the tombs; second-hand boots and shoes; cutlery; hats and caps; rat-traps and mouse-traps and birdcages; flowers and seeds; skittles; and frames for photographs. Cheap- jacks have their carts beside the pavement; and with strident voice proclaim the goodness of their wares, which include in this district bloaters and dried haddocks, as well as crockery. And one is amazed, seeing how the open-air Fair goes on, why the shops are kept open at all.""

    "The idea that Lechmere would have been delivering a single commodity is wildly unlikely when his van would have been carrying 4 to 5 tons of goods. Even if he was delivering to Spitalfields Market, it is unlikely that the entire cargo would go to a single vendor or consist of a single commodity. Then Lechemere would be expected to return to Broad Street Station with goods that he picked up. Again, this would be wildly unlikely to have been picked up from one location, let alone be one commodity."

    "As noted, period standard for Pickford's appears to have been each van doing 2 sets of deliveries and returns. Lechmere might have had the occasional day where he only did one set of deliveries and returns, but it would be an exception and he'd probably have to work later on another day to make up for the lost wages. And, as previously noted, a Pickford's van typically carried both a carman and a conductor, or book carrier."

    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
    Now perhaps you can explain how Pickford’s deliveries of provincial horse flesh worked. Who received them and what other commodities were carried alongside the produce of the knacker’s yards, bearing in mind the strict legal distinction between knacker’s meat and food for human consumption.

    How many firms were involved in the horse flesh trade and where were they located?

    I’m assuming you have established these facts because you are not using qualifiers.
    Clearly you did not read my post. I used 10 qualifiers, which I have now bolded.

    I made no comments on how "Pickford's deliveries of provincial horse flesh worked" other than to agree with your statement that as perishables, it would have made sense to deliver them as rapidly possible. I do know that Pickford's had been in business for a long time so there cannot be a single answer for what businesses shipped horsemeat, what businesses or individuals received horsemeat, how much horsemeat was shipped to or from the Broad Street Station, how much was horsemeat shipped on any given day, or what items were carried in the same van load as any individual shipment of horsemeat.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Fiver View Post

      RJ has already shown that, unless she knew John Lechmere was still alive, enough time had passed for her second marriage to be legal.
      No he hasn’t.

      If, when JAL had been absent for more than seven years, Maria was unaware whether he was alive, she could remarry without committing the offence of bigamy. However, as John was still alive when her subsequent marriages took place, they were null and void.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Fiver View Post

        Perhaps you should read what I actually wrote. I made no attempt to establish what load Charles Lechmere was carrying on any given day. My point was that we cannot know what Charles Lechmere was carrying on any given day.

        "From what I can find, the standard for Pickford's was "Each team of horses takes out for delivery, and returns with, two loads of goods daily" and "a full three-horse-van carries between four and five tons". At the time, Pickford's appears to have transported goods for both businesses and individuals. There certainly would be regular bulk shipments to and from large firms, but even those wouldn't necessarily be the same size or be shipped every day. Smaller firms and individuals would be even more irregular in the size and frequency of their shipments."

        "The nearest Market appears to have been Spitalfield's Market (fruit, vegetables, flowers), though plenty of other things were available there as well. And there were plenty of business outside the Markets. A period source notes "All day long and all the year round there is a constant Fair going on in Whitechapel Road. It is held upon the broad pavement, which was benevolently intended, no doubt, for this purpose. Here are displayed all kinds of things; bits of second-hand furniture, such as the head of a wooden bed, whose griminess is perhaps exaggerated, in order that a purchaser may expect something extraordinarily cheap. Here are lids of pots and saucepans laid out, to show that in the warehouse, of which these things are specimens, will be found the principal parts of the utensils for sale; here are unexpected things, such as rows of skates, sold cheap in summer, light clothing in winter; workmen’s tools of every kind, including, perhaps, the burglarious jemmy; second-hand books – a miscellaneous collection, establishing the fact that the readers of books in Whitechapel – a feeble and scanty folk – read nothing at all except sermons and meditations among the tombs; second-hand boots and shoes; cutlery; hats and caps; rat-traps and mouse-traps and birdcages; flowers and seeds; skittles; and frames for photographs. Cheap- jacks have their carts beside the pavement; and with strident voice proclaim the goodness of their wares, which include in this district bloaters and dried haddocks, as well as crockery. And one is amazed, seeing how the open-air Fair goes on, why the shops are kept open at all.""

        "The idea that Lechmere would have been delivering a single commodity is wildly unlikely when his van would have been carrying 4 to 5 tons of goods. Even if he was delivering to Spitalfields Market, it is unlikely that the entire cargo would go to a single vendor or consist of a single commodity. Then Lechemere would be expected to return to Broad Street Station with goods that he picked up. Again, this would be wildly unlikely to have been picked up from one location, let alone be one commodity."

        "As noted, period standard for Pickford's appears to have been each van doing 2 sets of deliveries and returns. Lechmere might have had the occasional day where he only did one set of deliveries and returns, but it would be an exception and he'd probably have to work later on another day to make up for the lost wages. And, as previously noted, a Pickford's van typically carried both a carman and a conductor, or book carrier."



        Clearly you did not read my post. I used 10 qualifiers, which I have now bolded.

        I made no comments on how "Pickford's deliveries of provincial horse flesh worked" other than to agree with your statement that as perishables, it would have made sense to deliver them as rapidly possible. I do know that Pickford's had been in business for a long time so there cannot be a single answer for what businesses shipped horsemeat, what businesses or individuals received horsemeat, how much horsemeat was shipped to or from the Broad Street Station, how much was horsemeat shipped on any given day, or what items were carried in the same van load as any individual shipment of horsemeat.
        I shan’t waste my time responding to this.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
          Your source is an article that appeared in All The Year Round in 1863 and which describes Pickfords activities at Camden. Their relationship with the LNWR was going through a sticky patch at that time and they moved from Camden around 1864.
          Yes, my source is The Year Round in 1863. That's why I added lots of qualifiers, since you can only extrapolate so far from a single source. I would be happy to see additional sources about day to day operations at Pickford's if you have any.

          Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
          Pickfords were universal carriers, meaning they carried just about anything: consumer goods, foodstuffs, minerals, building materials, fuel...and more besides.
          I am aware that Pickfords were universal carriers. I am aware that means that they carried just about anything. I have stated this repeatedly to show that we cannot know what Charles Lechmere carried on any given day.

          Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
          Do you really believe the few facts and figures you have gleaned about their activities in Camden in 1863 are valid for whatever loads CAL was carrying in 1888?
          I used 10 qualifiers in my statements about Pickford's deliveries. So far, you have provided no evidence that any of Pickford's methods being used in 1863 had been changed significantly in 1888.

          Here's a second source from 1883. Goods that were shipped from Broad Street Station. One of the witnesses against the carman was the van boy who accompanied him.

          Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
          Broad Street and Liverpool Street next door were major hubs for butchers meat, fish and cats meat. Deliveries from there would have gone to Smithfield, Billingsgate and Harrison, Barber and a handful of other horseflesh wholesalers.
          And what is your point? With over 20 years of service, Charles Lechmere probably delivered horseflesh and other meats during some of the thousands of pickups and deliveries he made for Pickfords.




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