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Does anything rule Bury out?

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  • Originally posted by Wyatt Earp View Post
    It's not hard to see, then, how he could have measured out to be 5'5" or 5'6" when fully attired, which would also align him with the height estimates of Israel Schwartz (5'5") and Joseph Lawende (low estimate 5'7")
    Some boots, those. Was he auditining for a glam-rock band?
    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

    "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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    • Originally posted by John Wheat View Post
      Bury was an alcoholic. Which would mean it unlikely inebriation would unduly trouble him during the Jack the Ripper murders.
      Being truly inebriated - as in swaying-about drunk - would have hampered the killer significantly, whether he was an alcoholic or not.
      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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      • Actually, a regular imbiber or drug user is more likely to be in control than someone not used to either out on a binge.

        Serial rapist and murderer, Mark Dixie, for example, was a heavy drinker and user of cannabis and cocaine for years:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Dixie

        Love,

        Caz
        X
        "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


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        • If we could get a decent photo of WHB, that would be a great help. The press sketch makes him look fifty years old. He's certainly one of my Possible suspects now that I've found out a bit more about him. The only thing at this point in time that would rule him out and it's been mentioned before, is that if Alice MacKenzie is indeed a Ripper victim. But that's another story!

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          • Originally posted by caz View Post
            Actually, a regular imbiber or drug user is more likely to be in control than someone not used to either out on a binge
            Quite so, Caz, which is why the visibly-intoxicated man seen with Stride was arguably not a hardened drinker.
            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

            "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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            • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
              Quite so, Caz, which is why the visibly-intoxicated man seen with Stride was arguably not a hardened drinker.
              Nor was he her killer !

              www.trevormarriott.co.uk

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              • Originally posted by Trevor Marriott View Post
                Nor was he her killer !
                Au contraire, Trevor. You don't have to be 100% compos mentis merely to wrestle with a woman and slash one side of her throat. He could well have done it.
                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                  Quite so, Caz, which is why the visibly-intoxicated man seen with Stride was arguably not a hardened drinker.
                  His condition and the condition of Stride's gently laid down body are two of the reasons I think he was not her murderer.

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                  • Originally posted by curious View Post
                    His condition and the condition of Stride's gently laid down body are two of the reasons I think he was not her murderer.
                    His condition wouldn't have prevented him from slashing her throat, but you make an interesting point about the disposition of the body - if it was the killer who laid her down, of course, and assuming that it was gently done. That said, her throat wasn't as thoroughly severed as the others, and it has been suggested that she might not have expired instantaneously; if so, perhaps it was she who put herself into her final resting position.
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                    • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                      Some boots, those. Was he auditining for a glam-rock band?
                      I think those are called “elevator boots,” lol.
                      “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

                      William Bury, Victorian Murderer
                      http://www.williambury.org

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                      • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                        perhaps it was she who put herself into her final resting position.
                        Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                        perhaps it was she who put herself into her final resting position.
                        interesting point, yourself.

                        I'll have to re-read the description of the mud on her clothing. Because, if she were squirming around to get herself into position would it not increase the amount of mud on her clothing?

                        It's been too long since I've read those descriptions to have any real idea. I have a "feeling" there wasn't a great deal of mud, but again too long . . .

                        curious

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                        • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                          Quite so, Caz, which is why the visibly-intoxicated man seen with Stride was arguably not a hardened drinker.
                          Morning Gareth,

                          He may not have been her killer either.

                          Mark Dixie, high on drink and drugs, was seen by nobody when he watched and waited as one of his victims, Sally Anne Bowman, argued with her boyfriend in his car, parked outside her house. Dixie struck when she got out of the car and her boyfriend drove off. A neighbour heard screams but didn't investigate. Dixie hid in the darkness, listening out for any residents or cars approaching [as Stride's killer may have done, if he heard the pony and cart coming while he was still in the yard], before returning to his dead or dying victim to rape and mutilate her and take trophies.

                          The victim's boyfriend, having no alibi, was the obvious suspect, and would almost certainly have gone down for her murder had DNA evidence not cleared him. And had Dixie been disturbed after the initial attack, it would have looked more like a domestic incident, resulting from the couple's argument.

                          Sally Anne was Dixie's second victim that night. He had attacked the first a few streets away and not long before, but she was more fortunate. Dixie was scared off by a passing taxi, and went looking for another woman to attack.

                          Sorry for straying off topic, but I thought it relevant to the alcohol issue.

                          Love,

                          Caz
                          X
                          "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


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                          • Originally posted by caz View Post
                            Morning Gareth,

                            He may not have been her killer either.
                            Indeed, Caz, but for your Mark Dixie example to apply in this case, we'd have to believe (a) that Stride wasn't killed by the first man, but by a putative "JTR" who came along immediately after the first man left; and (b) that "JTR" was then interrupted in the instant after he'd cut Stride's throat by the arrival of Louis Dymshitz. I'm not one to be unduly fazed by coincidences, but (a) and (b) would appear to be a rather unlikely series of events.
                            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                            "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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