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  • Bury's handwriting

    Can anyone post a copy of one of the letters written by Bury please?

    I consider him a strong suspect to at least one of the JTR murders and I'd very much like to see his handwriting.

    Cheers!

  • #2
    This is the last part of his confession letter witnessed by the Rev Gough.

    I've got some more examples somewhere if I can lay my hands on them.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Not the greatest bit of photography in the world but I hope this helps. The first page of Bury's confession.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        He seems to get all excited when he writes the word "strangulation." Look how large the letter "s" is compared to that letter in other words. It doesn't seem to be a capital letter, as the capital letter in "Street" ("Princes Street") appears to be formed differently (although it's blurry and a bit hard to tell).
        “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

        William Bury, Victorian Murderer
        http://www.williambury.org

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        • #5
          Cheers very much Wyatt Earp
          Greatly appreciated

          Yea that is an interesting detail you point out there. I'll have a proper look at it all.

          Cheers!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Andersen View Post
            Cheers very much Wyatt Earp
            Greatly appreciated
            Hi Andersen. It's John you want to thank for the scans, not me.
            Last edited by Wyatt Earp; 10-30-2012, 11:27 PM.
            “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

            William Bury, Victorian Murderer
            http://www.williambury.org

            Comment


            • #7
              He seems to get all excited when he writes the word "strangulation." Look how large the letter "s" is compared to that letter in other words. It doesn't seem to be a capital letter, as the capital letter in "Street" ("Princes Street") appears to be formed differently (although it's blurry and a bit hard to tell).
              The same construction though is present in solemnly State - albeit the capitalised S doesn't appear to be quite so large...

              The Capitalisation doesn't seem to be entirely consistent throughout though - eg "to make Public" and then later "Pardon of Almighty God" - God, well yes, Almighty is perhaps understandable (though the "A" is I think the largest capital on the page), but there's no real reason for Pardon or Public...

              I think we could all too easily Read too much into This..

              All the best

              Dave

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              • #8
                So it is - cheers a lot Johns

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                • #9
                  No problem old bean.

                  I thought I had a copy of the letter he wrote offering work in Dundee but I'm mistaken.

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                  • #10
                    I just realized that this confession letter is reproduced on page 208 in Jack the Ripper: Letters from Hell by Evans and Skinner. With the better reproduction, it's evident that what I thought was "strangulation" should be "Strangulation," as the "S," while at a different angle, is indeed formed like the "S" in "Street." I'm not sure why Bury would choose to capitalize this word. Also, Bury appears to have spelled the word without the "u."
                    “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

                    William Bury, Victorian Murderer
                    http://www.williambury.org

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Wyatt

                      As I observed in post #7 though, he does seem to capitalise certain words randomly, so the Strangulation isn't necessarily that significant in itself...

                      All the best

                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
                        Hi Wyatt

                        As I observed in post #7 though, he does seem to capitalise certain words randomly, so the Strangulation isn't necessarily that significant in itself...

                        All the best

                        Dave
                        Hi Dave,

                        And the possibility of a condemned man playing word games in a confessional document prior to his execution seems an unlikely one.

                        Regards, Bridewell.
                        "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

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                        • #13
                          Surprised

                          Hi Colin

                          Quite...although having read, (and re-read), MacPherson, Bury does actually make quite an interesting suspect...sadly a lot of the alleged supporting evidence, (eg the chalk messages on the cellar door), is, IMHO at least, pants...but I certainly wouldn't rule him out altogether...

                          All the best

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bridewell View Post
                            And the possibility of a condemned man playing word games in a confessional document prior to his execution seems an unlikely one.
                            I'm not sure I would class this as a word game. I suppose we normally go out of our way to capitalize words when we wish to attach some special significance to them, so it could simply be suggested that strangulation was of some significance to Bury.

                            I don't agree with Dave's suggestion that words might be randomly capitalized throughout the letter. Apart from "Strangulation," the only words that appear to be capitalized are proper names and words that stand at the beginning of a sentence.

                            I think what has fooled Dave is that Bury at times writes some rather large lower-case letters. The words "public," "publicly" and "pardon" aren't capitalized at all. To see what Bury's capital "P" looks like, take a look at "Prison" (at the top of the document) and "Princes" (in the phrase "Princes Street").
                            “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

                            William Bury, Victorian Murderer
                            http://www.williambury.org

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Wyatt

                              "solemnly State"..."Almighty"...sorry I can see where you're coming from but am not quite convinced!

                              What occurs to me though is what a generally well formed hand it is for the son of a rural fishmonger...

                              All the best

                              Dave

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