Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Patrick McIntyre

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Patrick McIntyre

    Patrick McIntyre was a Detective Sergeant in Special Branch, who was reduced to the rank of uniformed Constable on the pretext (according to his account) of a technical breach of regulations, and subsequently resigned from the Force (in 1894, I believe). In the thesis by Lindsay Clutterbuck, quoted by Simon Wood on the "Special Branch Ledgers" thread, use is made of McIntyre's memoirs, which were published in 17 instalments in Reynolds's Newspaper in 1895. On 7 April, in an article on anarchists, there is a paragraph on the murder of Elizabeth Stride. (This doesn't seem to be available online, though I see A. P. Wolf quoted a bit of it in a previous discussion.)

    One group held meetings in Berners-street, Whitechapel. Concerts and dancing took place here on Saturday nights, and whilst one of these was taking place, during the time of the Jack the Ripper scare, an extraordinary event took place just outside the Anarchists' meeting place. At the very moment when these people were indulging in festivity in an upstairs room, the "Ripper" was cruelly murdering an unfortunate in the courtway adjoining. It is worth noting that no kind of suspicion fell upon the Anarchists in this connection; no one believed for a moment that the anonymous stabber was one of their confraternity. And here I can say that I am certain that, although the Anarchists talked wildly and advocated schemes that seemed utterly impracticable to the ordinary observer, they were all quiet and peaceful men, well disposed to their fellow-creatures in general. I had a good deal of experience amongst all sections of the East-end Anarchists, and, according to my observation, in spite of their tenets, they were a good-hearted and sympathetic class of the community. Nearly all of them were foreigners who were being sweated in East-end workshops. There was, however, a small sprinkling of English working men who had mostly suffered somewhat at the hands of the capitalists.

  • #2
    Azef

    Hello Chris. Nice find, and undoubtedly true. No doubt the mass of peaceful socialists and anarchists at the IWMEC were horrified at the event of Liz Stride's death.

    Of course, all it takes is one bad apple . . .

    Have you ever heard of Evno Azef? Interesting character.

    Cheers.
    LC

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Chris,

      They are online on the British Library website. Not easy to find I must admit.
      The series started on the 3 February 1895.

      Reynolds Newspaper Sunday 7 April 1895
      Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds Newspaper 7 April 1895.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	187.6 KB
ID:	659690

      Reynolds Newspaper Sunday 3 February 1895
      Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds Newspaper 3 February 1895.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	79.0 KB
ID:	659691

      Rob

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Rob Clack View Post
        They are online on the British Library website. Not easy to find I must admit.
        Yes - that's where I got it from. It's unfortunate that the quality of the scans is so poor in some cases, and that parts of two of the instalments had crumbled away completely.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Chris View Post
          Yes - that's where I got it from. It's unfortunate that the quality of the scans is so poor in some cases, and that parts of two of the instalments had crumbled away completely.
          I've now managed to find substitutes for the instalments that weren't legible in the British Library 19th-century newspapers collection. I have put together a (rather large) zip file containing images of the whole series of articles. If anyone would like a copy, they should send me a private message.

          In summary, the contents are as follows:

          SCOTLAND YARD.
          ITS MYSTERIES AND METHODS.

          1895-02-03
          [INTRODUCTION.]
          Life and career before transfer to the Political Department in 1883. Brief outline of the material to be dealt with in the articles.

          1895-02-10
          SHADOWING SUSPECTED FENIANS.
          The formation of the Political Department and McIntyre's recruitment. His initial work shadowing suspects in the investigation of the explosion at the Local Government Board Offices.

          1895-02-17
          HUNTING A SHADOW.
          The suspect John O'Connor, who was supported financially by the O'Donovan Rossa faction. Brief description of the Birmingham dynamite conspiracy. The story of a separate inquiry on behalf of the French government, of a General in London falsely alleged to have been supplying arms to an African sultan.

          1895-02-24
          ON THE TRACK OF THE DYNAMITERS.
          The story of the Birmingham bombing conspiracy.

          1895-03-03
          THE DYNAMITARDS' DOOM.
          The trial of the Birmingham conspirators and McIntyre's opinion of the case.

          1895-03-10
          "RED JIM McDERMOTT."
          The story of a British agent James McDermott, alias "Red Jim", and his associates, Captain Phelan and [Matt] O'Brien.

          1895-03-17
          IRISH PLOTS AND AMERICAN CASH.
          Discussion of the dynamiters sentenced at Liverpool, and the probable role of McDermott in framing one of them, O'Connor. The shadowing of a man calling himself J. D. McCarthy, alleged to be bringing cash from America. Brief discussion of Edward Jenkinson and his role at the Home Office.

          1895-03-24
          THE CAREY FAMILY.
          The story of the Carey family and their role in the Phoenix Park murders. McIntyre's work in protecting the widow and children of James Carey.

          1895-03-31
          THE CAREY-O'DONNELL TRAGEDY.
          The trial of Patrick O'Donnell for the murder of James Carey.

          1895-04-07
          THE ANARCHISTS.
          The Anarchist movement and the Autonomie club in Windmill Street. A paragraph on the Berner Street club and the Ripper murder there. The arrest of Nicoll and Mowbray, editor and publisher of Commonweal, after the publication of an article on the conviction of the Walsall anarchists.

          1895-04-14
          THE WALSALL PLOT AND THE SPY.
          The story of the Walsall plot and [Auguste] Coulon's role as an agent provocateur.

          1895-04-21
          A TUSSLE WITH A FRENCH ANARCHIST.
          The search for a French anarchist, Francois, who fled to London after a bomb explosion at the Cafe Very in Paris.

          1895-04-28
          [UNTITLED.]
          Investigation of the drilling of Socialists by an ex-army drill instructor, before "Bloody Sunday." The death of the anarchist Martial Bourdin when his bomb exploded in Greenwich Park, and the facts behind it as told to McIntyre by an informer.

          1895-05-05
          A BLACKMAILER OF ROYALTY.
          The arrest of a man who tried to extort money from the Prince of Wales. The discovery that Edward Jenkinson had been recruiting Irish Roman Catholics in London and setting some of them to watch the regular CID, and his resignation.

          1895-05-12
          MY RECOLLECTIONS OF LE CARON.
          McIntyre duties protecting first met Major Le Caron (Henry Beach) after he gave evidence before the Parnell Commission. The relations of Le Caron with Anderson and [Edward Caulfield] Houston. An unofficial investigation of the Pigott letter in Paris.

          1895-05-19
          THE STORY OF MY REDUCTION.
          The story of the investigation of McIntyre as a result of unfounded rumours that he had entered a liaison with a the daughter of a female anarchist, and of his reduction to the rank of constable by Anderson on the pretext of a technical breach of duty. McIntyre's belief that Le Caron had poisoned Anderson's mind against him.

          1895-05-26
          MY RESIGNATION FROM THE FORCE.
          McIntyre's transfer to Kentish Town (Y Division), his illness and resignation. Examples of others who had been shown more leniency, and two final anecdotes about Anderson.

          Comment


          • #6
            As mentioned in the articles, after resigning from the police force McIntyre kept the Foresters' Arms, which was at 294 Borough High Street. (He had been a barman and cellarman in Ballymena and Glasgow before joining the force.) He was at that address at the time of the 1901 census, together with his wife Catherine, and his daughter [?]Katie.

            His death, at the age of 44, was registered at Wandsworth in the third quarter of 1902. The Police Index (http://www.blacksheepindex.co.uk/POLNOTES.htm) lists an obituary published the same year.

            Comment


            • #7
              McIntyre on Anderson: 1

              McIntyre was no admirer of Anderson, whom he blamed for ending his career. I thought people might find the following excerpts interesting.

              In the introductory article, which appeared on 3 February 1895, he commented on what he saw as a system of "espionage" introduced by Anderson:
              Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-02-03.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	65.2 KB
ID:	659878

              Comment


              • #8
                McIntyre on Anderson: 2

                In the article on the Walsall Bomb Plot, published on 14 April 1895, which according to McIntyre was set up by Auguste Coulon working on behalf of Scotland Yard, he appears to lay the responsibility at Anderson's door:
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-04-14.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	78.7 KB
ID:	659879

                Comment


                • #9
                  In the article on the government agent Henri Le Caron, published on 12 May 1895, he describes his relationship with Anderson and makes some barbed comments about the latter's religious practices:
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-05-12-1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	63.9 KB
ID:	659880
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-05-12-2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	85.8 KB
ID:	659881

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    McIntyre on Anderson: 4

                    In the article published on 19 May 1895, he relates the story of his reduction to the rank of constable following an encounter with a female anarchist from his home town:
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-05-19.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	112.2 KB
ID:	659882

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      McIntyre on Anderson: 5

                      And as a parting shot, in the final article, published on 26 May 1895, he includes two more anecdotes about Anderson:
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-05-26-1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	71.1 KB
ID:	659883
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	Reynolds-1895-05-26-2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	75.5 KB
ID:	659884

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hello Chris, Rob,

                        A few little titbits about Patrick McIntyre are in Andrew Cook's book, "M, MI5's First Spymaster" about Melville..

                        page 12.. " founder member, Special Irish Branch, 1882"
                        page 70.. " persued (along with Quinn and Walsh) the two men that arrived in Liverpool with Moroney from New York on the day of the Jubilee"
                        page 96.. " In 1890, McIntyre (taken from Royal duties at Osborne) and Sweeney were assigned to protecting Le Caron after the Parnell Commission."

                        His involvement with that infamous Doctor, Neil Cream, is also recorded in the book. I can summarise this if needed.

                        best wishes

                        Phil
                        Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


                        Justice for the 96 = achieved
                        Accountability? ....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Phil Carter View Post
                          A few little titbits about Patrick McIntyre are in Andrew Cook's book, "M, MI5's First Spymaster" about Melville..

                          page 12.. " founder member, Special Irish Branch, 1882"
                          page 70.. " persued (along with Quinn and Walsh) the two men that arrived in Liverpool with Moroney from New York on the day of the Jubilee"
                          page 96.. " In 1890, McIntyre (taken from Royal duties at Osborne) and Sweeney were assigned to protecting Le Caron after the Parnell Commission."

                          His involvement with that infamous Doctor, Neil Cream, is also recorded in the book. I can summarise this if needed.
                          The articles concentrate on his Special Branch activities, so Cream is mentioned only in passing. I don't think the pursuit of the two men is in there (unless I've missed it).

                          Walsh plays a part in one of the articles on anarchists. Interestingly, his own memoirs were published in 20 instalments in Thomson's Weekly News between May and September of 1907. Although one episode is entitled "How I arrested Tynan, the Invincible", there is more on anarchists (7 instalments) than on Fenians. The remainder is about non-political crime.

                          Walsh's first instalment relates the story of the arrest of Francois, also covered by McIntyre. As far as I could see, that included Walsh's only reference to the Ripper murders - he said that he succeeded in winning over a hostile crowd that was hindering the arrest by telling them that Francois was the Ripper.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chris View Post
                            Walsh's first instalment relates the story of the arrest of Francois, also covered by McIntyre. As far as I could see, that included Walsh's only reference to the Ripper murders - he said that he succeeded in winning over a hostile crowd that was hindering the arrest by telling them that Francois was the Ripper.
                            Actually, checking the dates, that does seem rather unlikely. Francois apparently fled to England after the bombing of the Cafe Very in Paris, which took place in April 1892. So his arrest in London would have taken place nearly four years after the main series of Whitechapel Murders.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This topic is really interesting. A lot of the information on the special branch I'm finding really hard to come by, and I'm studying its origins for coursework. Is there any chance you'd be able to post/send me the links/zip folders you have on their setting up, and early years?

                              I'm really sorry, I would have private messaged you, but am new to this forum and could not figure out how to.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X