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The Indents in the GSG

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Spider View Post
    Hand-made Victorian bricks were a standard imperial size (9 inches by 2 and 3/4 inches).
    That makes sense, Spider. I thought the bricks looked oversize.

    So they’re 9 inches long by 4 1/4 wide by 2 3/4 high.

    That means the width of the post was 9” + 4 1/4” + 1/2” for mortar.

    That equals 13 3/4 inches. That’s still at least over an inch too small for the alleged “3” literal lines of writing as transcribed in the non-broken, non-indented version.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by DJA View Post
      The middle line is 17 letters and 3 spaces which equals 20.
      Multiply by 3/4".
      15" will not fit.

      Sam makes a good point about poetry as this is the manner in which it is written.

      Guess who was known as a lover of poetry!

      Once again, the author and the person Long saw in Hanbury Street are of very similar height. About 5'3".
      That’s great about your suspect and the “poetic” clue. I’m not sure what point Sam was making about poetry. He was talking about the writing convention when space runs out and he used a poetic example. Then again the transcript could have been written by PC Longfellow!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Trapperologist View Post
        [Sam] was talking about the writing convention when space runs out and he used a poetic example.
        I also mentioned plays, and - although I didn't say so - I've used that convention to write any old text.
        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

        "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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        • #34
          I mentioned the manner in which it was written.Sutton liked poetry.
          He also lectured on pathology at the London Hospital a few hundred meters from Nichols' murder.Um,chalk,indents on enormous old triple sliding green/black boards.
          Not to mention his medical and pathology books.

          Oh Hell, hand made bricks were 9" long,so the Peabody buildings suddenly must have been built with them instead of the machine made ones.
          Did anyone actually read Howard Brown's article?
          Rhetorical question

          Grrr.
          Haven't had my coffee yet.
          My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Curious Cat View Post

            So you don't subscribe to the idea it was dropped there on the way back to the killer's base?

            Would the killer have gone up and down Goulston Street twice without being seen or is the suggestion that there was a separate route away from Mitre Square first?
            hi curious
            i think the unforeseen events of that night-ie the ripper being seen/interrupted that night at both murder scenes led him to get a little payback with the GSG/apron incriminating jews.

            I think the time frame fits with him going back to his bolt hole after the eddowes murder-cleaning up, dropping off his knife and goodies and grabbing some chalk. then heading back out.

            The interesting geoprofile work that jeff Ham has displayed(and I thought of concurrently) lends to the idea that the rippers bolt hole may have been somewhere north within about 5-10 minutes walk from Goulston street. so after leaving mitre square the ripper traveled in a northwest route to his bolthole then southish to Goulston street to write the graffiti and then quickly back to his bolt hole. it fits all the evidence and is a logical narrative.

            "Is all that we see or seem
            but a dream within a dream?"

            -Edgar Allan Poe


            "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
            quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

            -Frederick G. Abberline

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            • #36
              Originally posted by DJA View Post
              Did anyone actually read Howard Brown's article?
              Yeah, years ago. It's pretty convincing.

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              • #37
                >If you are speaking of Howard Brown, he would have come up 4 inches too long if we're keeping to the door jamb dimension of 12 inches wide. He got 16 inches every time. DJA guessed 15<<

                Not sure how the three line version could be the same length as the five line version. The 5 line would comfortably fit.
                dustymiller
                aka drstrange

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                • #38
                  I’m going with the 5 line version. It does fit comfortably.

                  The problem is that, with the line writing convention Sam is talking about, the third line “Will be” is not the end of a line so the convention doesn’t explain it.

                  But doesn’t one have to admit the convention does provide a good explanation for why Hanse said there were 3 lines when there were 5 with two indented?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                    I also mentioned plays, and - although I didn't say so - I've used that convention to write any old text.
                    I think most people would only do that on a form when space runs out.

                    So maybe it does narrow things down and we can finally make a dent in this case.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by DJA View Post
                      I mentioned the manner in which it was written.Sutton liked poetry....

                      Oh Hell, hand made bricks were 9" long,so the Peabody buildings suddenly must have been built with them instead of the machine made ones.
                      Did anyone actually read Howard Brown's article?
                      Rhetorical question

                      Grrr.
                      Haven't had my coffee yet.
                      No not the whole building - just the post for looks I guess.


                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Trapperologist View Post
                        I think most people would only do that on a form when space runs out.
                        Indeed, like when you're approaching the edge of a page in a small pocket-book.
                        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                        "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Does that explain the convention as used by the author of the GSG?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Trapperologist View Post
                            Does that explain the convention as used by the author of the GSG?
                            It's quite possible that it's precisely what we're dealing with.
                            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                            "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Could explain it ... Click image for larger version

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                              dustymiller
                              aka drstrange

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Trapperologist View Post
                                Does that explain the convention as used by the author of the GSG?
                                Try writing 'The men that will not" in a natural and comfortable small form suitable for a policeman's pocket notebook.

                                My effort was exactly 3",leaving a spare inch.
                                My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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