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Antisemitism as a diversionary tactic

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  • Originally posted by Robert View Post
    Thanks Gareth. Is this to do with euphony?
    To some extent, yes. Where a mutation happens, the words trip off the tongue more smoothly than using the word in its root form. However, it's a little more complex, given that mutations also signify possession/gender: "cadair" is "chair", "the chair" is "y gadair", "his chair" is "ei gadair", "her chair" is "ei chadair", "my chair" is "fy nghadair".
    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

    "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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    • Thanks Gareth. Sounds complicated but I'm sure there's a logic to it which facilitates communication to a high degree, else the language would not have survived.

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      • it looks like a mess, but ive heard that Welsh is the most beautiful spoken language in the world.
        "Is all that we see or seem
        but a dream within a dream?"

        -Edgar Allan Poe


        "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
        quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

        -Frederick G. Abberline

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        • I think I remember John Betjeman saying something similar.

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          • A reference to the use of the name Lipski I found about a year ago. Walter Selwen was captured in a Bond robbery by Abberline. This post card was forwarded to him from the Vine Street Police Station. Almost sounds like Lipski was the nickname of someone involved in the case?

            London Standard
            Wednesday, January 27, 1892, London, Middlesex

            http://i.imgur.com/JilASIJ.jpg

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            • Originally posted by jerryd View Post
              A reference to the use of the name Lipski I found about a year ago. Walter Selwen was captured in a Bond robbery by Abberline. This post card was forwarded to him from the Vine Street Police Station. Almost sounds like Lipski was the nickname of someone involved in the case?

              London Standard
              Wednesday, January 27, 1892, London, Middlesex

              http://i.imgur.com/JilASIJ.jpg
              It sure does. How odd!

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              • Could it be mocking Abberline because he had been out looking for a Lipski character and while they found a few they eventually concluded it was a racial slur?
                Bona fide canonical and then some.

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                • Originally posted by Batman View Post
                  Could it be mocking Abberline because he had been out looking for a Lipski character and while they found a few they eventually concluded it was a racial slur?
                  Hi Batman

                  I don’t read the racial slur aspect in this particular comment.

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                  • Originally posted by jerryd View Post
                    Hi Batman

                    I don’t read the racial slur aspect in this particular comment.
                    I guess what I am saying is, if there was a joke about the search for Lipski, which wasn't a person, is being brought up here as a person. He calls Abberline, the romancer. So it seems to have some funny undertones.

                    I am just looking for alternative explanations to someone on the force being called Lipski, which would be astounding if true.

                    Maybe it was the nickname of the officer in charge of the Lipski investigation?

                    Abberline the romancer would be Abberline nickname?
                    Bona fide canonical and then some.

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                    • Originally posted by Batman View Post
                      Abberline the romancer would be Abberline nickname?
                      Possibly an insult to Abberline, rather than his nickname. The second definition of romancer in the OED is "One who deals in extravagant fictions; an inventor of false history; a fantastic liar". Just the sort of insult a criminal might throw at a detective responsible for assembling a case against him.
                      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                      • The headline in the paper stated A Romance of Crime. I believe Selwen may be referrng to himself as the romancer.

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                        • Originally posted by jerryd View Post
                          The headline in the paper stated A Romance of Crime. I believe Selwen may be referrng to himself as the romancer.
                          I read it as "Regards to Lipski... and Abberline, the romancer."
                          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                          "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                          • It would be a nice surprise if Dorset St., PC, mysterious L.64 turned out to be PC LIPSKI 64

                            Anyway, I heard someone solved that mystery?

                            Simon Wood has 200 of them here.

                            https://www.casebook.org/dissertatio...personnel.html
                            Bona fide canonical and then some.

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                            • In America, "chippy" is a slang term for a prostitute.

                              c.d.

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                              • I never did get a response to "Lipski" being used as a verb as in I'll come over there and Lipski your ass. Maybe I just imagined that I read that somewhere..

                                c.d.

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