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Use of "Buckled" To Denote Arrest

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
    Sam,
    Don't forget Some Mothers do 'ave 'em
    Nice one, Josh, but I think the "do" there is used for emphasis - it was always pronounced "Some mothers DO 'ave 'em". A sufferer of Ida Syndrome would have pronounced it "Some mothers do 'AVE 'em".

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  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    Sam,
    Don't forget Some Mothers do 'ave 'em

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  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    Many thanks Simon! I hope you're keeping well. So he was in charge when the Times purchased Piggott's forged letters; the Star's reference to him makes a bit more sense now.
    I thought it was a long shot, but he doesn't seem to have any connection to getting buckled. Unless it's a sly reference to being fooled by a fake letter!

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  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi Joshua,

    George Earle Buckle, Editor of The Times 18841911.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	BUCKLE.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	30.0 KB
ID:	667400

    Regards,

    Simon

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by curious4 View Post
    Not so much the "buckled" but the use of the word "do". Just sounds odd. Not a natural way of speaking somehow unless it's a dialect.
    It's a way of speaking in a number of working-class areas, including Wales. John Edwards, the unofficial historian of the South Wales Valleys dialect of Wenglish, gave this habit the tongue-in-cheek name "Ida Syndrome". Those who suffer from it are compelled to insert an unnecessary "do" whenever "I" appears before a verb, giving rise to such expressions as "I do like", "I do 'ave" and - God help us! - "I do do". (It even extends to "he do", "she do" and "they do".)

    Some examples: "I do love a nice bit of cheese"; "I do do my washing on Sundays"; "I do 'ave a real 'ard time with my kids"; "He do walk to work every day"; "She do get all 'er clothes at Marks & Sparks"; etc. I've always seen "I do get buckled" is an example of the same way of speaking/writing.

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  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    In the Star 11th Oct there's a lengthy discussion about the ineffectiveness of the Met at catching murderers;

    http://www.casebook.org/press_reports/star/s880911.html

    A couple of paragraphs in it contains the line "What a thrill of joy would pass over Mr BUCKLE'S face if he could get one-tenth part of such a holocaust of crime to weave into his impeachment of the Irish nation!"

    Anyone know who Mr Buckle might be, and if he was a well known figure at the time? If, for instance, he was in charge of prisons, might he be the inspiration for the phrase in the Dear Boss letter?

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  • Abby Normal
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert St Devil View Post
    Like "straight jacket" buckled ABBY?
    no like caught, busted, arrested.

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  • curious4
    replied
    Not so much the "buckled" but the use of the word "do". Just sounds odd. Not a natural way of speaking somehow unless it's a dialect. "Until I do get buckled" - almost as if he was sure he would be caught, perhaps. Or trying to mimic a way of speaking he/she had heard.

    Just saying
    C4

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  • Robert St Devil
    replied
    Like "straight jacket" buckled ABBY?

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  • Abby Normal
    replied
    One of the biggest myths in Ripperology is that the Dear Boss, and From Hell letter for that matter, are known Hoaxes.

    They are not, and both have things that point to them being written by the killer, and could have been written by the killer.

    In terms of the use of the word buckled, the author is simply using another term for caught.

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  • Jon Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sherlock Holmes View Post
    For that I shall refer you to a documentary that is available on YouTube called "Jack the Ripper: Tabloid Killer. you may or may not have seen it, but it's well worth a watch even though most of it is probably bosh
    Thanks, I`ll have a look at that.

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  • Robert St Devil
    replied
    SHERLOCK. My speculation for the evening is Tom Bullen being DIOGENES of the Croydon Advertiser.

    I went back to the press reports here to see which papers tended to source Central News over the Press Association or Reuters. The first incident i see of LEATHER APRON is in the Evening New Sep 8 with someone being identified with LA only two days later. STILL the joke was on for a good 3 weeks prior to Sep 30th. But Evening News seems so far a Press Association paper(?).

    DIOGENES gave me the answer as to why noone ever came forward in WC and then some. He explains how easy it was for a rip gang to get a woman on her back, how dirty deed men were radily available, how he walks the lowest neighborhoods with a cute "guide" and examines how easily it would be to kill her undetected since they hadnt seen a constable for "a good minute" (How random if it was MAry Kelly but thAt would be a ghost story then). He also meets a woman who lodged with "Leather Apron" and "Dark Annie". Seems that the women of WC got smarter - carrying whistles, traveling in pairs, overly suspicious of new strangers. That may have pushed LA indoors.

    Also i just read on the Bluebeard killer. Did any of these newspapers have lonely heart ads?

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  • Sherlock Holmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Jon Guy View Post
    No problem, Mr H.

    What evidence is there that the Dear Boss Letter is a fake written by an enterprising young Journalist looking to throw fuel on the fire and fuel the fear the people already had of "the Ripper" ?
    For that I shall refer you to a documentary that is available on YouTube called "Jack the Ripper: Tabloid Killer. you may or may not have seen it, but it's well worth a watch even though most of it is probably bosh

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sherlock Holmes View Post
    Sorry for the incredibly late reply John, didn't see your post. Despite the evidence that the Dear Boss Letter is a fake written by an enterprising young Journalist looking to throw fuel on the fire and fuel the fear the people already had of "the Ripper". The Lusk Letter, sent to the chairman of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee is in my opinion just as much of a challenge, this time to George Lusk directly.
    No problem, Mr H.

    What evidence is there that the Dear Boss Letter is a fake written by an enterprising young Journalist looking to throw fuel on the fire and fuel the fear the people already had of "the Ripper" ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sherlock Holmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Jon Guy View Post
    Surely the letter would have been sent to the police if a direct challenge to them ? Why send it to the press and then ask them to hold it back ?

    The fact that it was sent to the Central News Agency, and the details in the letter, to my mind, show that the author, like the whole country, was following the story in the newspapers.
    Although most newspapers carried basically the same stories, it may be possible to find a newspaper that mentions the Central News Agency, and "that joke about Leather Apron" and other details mentioned in the letter. Possibly, a newspaper printed close to when the letter was written.
    Certainly, the Chapman inquest was concluded possibly on the same day the letter was written.

    Sorry for the incredibly late reply John, didn't see your post. Despite the evidence that the Dear Boss Letter is a fake written by an enterprising young Journalist looking to throw fuel on the fire and fuel the fear the people already had of "the Ripper". The Lusk Letter, sent to the chairman of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee is in my opinion just as much of a challenge, this time to George Lusk directly.

    Regards
    Mr Holmes

    Leave a comment:

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