Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why are you drawn to the case?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Christian View Post

    Yes the old hag quoted that correct Herlock!!Yes I have posted a few nice images but I have an album 200+of images I’ve collected over last 30 years a lot I have not shared!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Christian
    replied
    Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

    I recall the story of the old woman Christian. Didn't he call her a slattern or a slatternly old woman? It's a word that we don't use today. Still loads of great photos of course. You've posted many of them.
    Yes the old hag quoted that correct Herlock!!Yes I have posted a few nice images but I have an album 200+of images I’ve collected over last 30 years a lot I have not shared!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Christian View Post

    Very good points Herlock indeed lots of missed chances with elderly east end residents!! Why oh why didn’t Mr Matters ask for theMillers Court name plate!!!?? Regards the Millers Court images think he was spooked by an elderly abusive resident but he did return days later to a vast pile of rubble!! It is annoying more images of Millers Court & Berner Street don’t exist but guess there wasn’t the interest 1900-1928 so thankful for what we have!!
    I recall the story of the old woman Christian. Didn't he call her a slattern or a slatternly old woman? It's a word that we don't use today. Still loads of great photos of course. You've posted many of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christian
    replied
    Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

    That’s true. We’re not that far past the time when there were people alive who were around at the time. If your grandad had lived until 100 that would have taken us into the 1980’s.

    One of the tantalising and frustrating things about the case is how people 90 or 100 years didn’t realise how huge the interest in this case would continue to be. All of the stories and rumours that might have been written down. Perhaps an important witness who never came forward at the time? Then there’s the frustration of the photographs. Whenever I see that famous photograph of the passage into Miller’s Court I can’t help thinking “why didn’t you go into the court and take a couple of photographs?” Whenever I see a Victorian London street scene I’m thinking “that bloke smoking a pipe might be Thomas Bowyer or that woman at the market stall could be Mrs Fiddymont.” Thats history....fascinating and frustrating.
    Very good points Herlock indeed lots of missed chances with elderly east end residents!! Why oh why didn’t Mr Matters ask for theMillers Court name plate!!!?? Regards the Millers Court images think he was spooked by an elderly abusive resident but he did return days later to a vast pile of rubble!! It is annoying more images of Millers Court & Berner Street don’t exist but guess there wasn’t the interest 1900-1928 so thankful for what we have!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Losmandris View Post

    I always had this regret with my grandparents. When I was younger I always took their stories about their childhood or living through the war for granted. Now I would give my eye teeth to speak and listen to them. I can completely related with what you are saying about the case. I am sure there have been hundreds of bit of crucial evidence, stuck in some attic or a draw somewhere that have now been thrown away by someone clearing out the house of a deceased relative.

    Tristan
    Absolutely Tristan. Who knows there might even be a real Diary of Jack the Ripper out there somewhere

    Leave a comment:


  • Losmandris
    replied
    Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

    That’s true. We’re not that far past the time when there were people alive who were around at the time. If your grandad had lived until 100 that would have taken us into the 1980’s.

    One of the tantalising and frustrating things about the case is how people 90 or 100 years didn’t realise how huge the interest in this case would continue to be. All of the stories and rumours that might have been written down. Perhaps an important witness who never came forward at the time? Then there’s the frustration of the photographs. Whenever I see that famous photograph of the passage into Miller’s Court I can’t help thinking “why didn’t you go into the court and take a couple of photographs?” Whenever I see a Victorian London street scene I’m thinking “that bloke smoking a pipe might be Thomas Bowyer or that woman at the market stall could be Mrs Fiddymont.” Thats history....fascinating and frustrating.
    I always had this regret with my grandparents. When I was younger I always took their stories about their childhood or living through the war for granted. Now I would give my eye teeth to speak and listen to them. I can completely related with what you are saying about the case. I am sure there have been hundreds of bit of crucial evidence, stuck in some attic or a draw somewhere that have now been thrown away by someone clearing out the house of a deceased relative.

    Tristan

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post

    Over on JTRForums I made the comment that I had personally spoken to someone who was present at one of the murders and the response was, ‘Was his name Methuselah?’

    Well, no, his name was Charles Humphries and as a 6-year-old he was living in GYB in August, 1888. He lived into his 80s and I chatted with him in the 1960s. He was my grandad.

    I love the fact that after his father died in 1890, his widowed mother moved with her two sons to nearby Angel Alley. And that he went on to marry a girl from Breezers Hill.

    1888 wasn’t all that long ago...



    That’s true. We’re not that far past the time when there were people alive who were around at the time. If your grandad had lived until 100 that would have taken us into the 1980’s.

    One of the tantalising and frustrating things about the case is how people 90 or 100 years didn’t realise how huge the interest in this case would continue to be. All of the stories and rumours that might have been written down. Perhaps an important witness who never came forward at the time? Then there’s the frustration of the photographs. Whenever I see that famous photograph of the passage into Miller’s Court I can’t help thinking “why didn’t you go into the court and take a couple of photographs?” Whenever I see a Victorian London street scene I’m thinking “that bloke smoking a pipe might be Thomas Bowyer or that woman at the market stall could be Mrs Fiddymont.” Thats history....fascinating and frustrating.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    Originally posted by harry View Post
    An interest is that I might have known and met him or passed him in the street.Quite possible ,as age,his old, mine young might have provided this possibility.
    Over on JTRForums I made the comment that I had personally spoken to someone who was present at one of the murders and the response was, ‘Was his name Methuselah?’

    Well, no, his name was Charles Humphries and as a 6-year-old he was living in GYB in August, 1888. He lived into his 80s and I chatted with him in the 1960s. He was my grandad.

    I love the fact that after his father died in 1890, his widowed mother moved with her two sons to nearby Angel Alley. And that he went on to marry a girl from Breezers Hill.

    1888 wasn’t all that long ago...




    Leave a comment:


  • Christian
    replied
    For me it’s the mystery!! Also do love the architecture the cobbled streets alleys also quite interested in social history!!And love collecting the books and photos of the East end!

    Leave a comment:


  • Losmandris
    replied
    Originally posted by Azarna View Post
    When I was about 10 or 11, a family friend died and left me some boxes of old books. My father, in his wisdom, decided we didn't need that many more books in the house and scrapped many of them, leaving just the children's books.

    Tucked in one of the previous remaining books was a yellowed newspaper article, from the early 1890s, talking about Jack the Ripper. I was very intrigued and had to find out more!

    My local library had given me adult library cards (totally against the rules, of course, heh) so I was able to get my paws on a couple of books with more about the case.

    And now, 40 years later, I still have "the bug".

    Whilst I have never had a "pet suspect", nor felt that the murderer will ever be identified, that didn't matter.,

    For me, it is that studying "all things Ripper" has opened so many doors and introduced me to so many other fascinating things.

    Some topics I have enjoyed learning more about, thanks to this case, are early photography, the history of the police force, everyday life in 19th Century London, the poor (Booth, social welfare etc), women's suffrage, sex workers, all sorts of aspects of forensics, 3d modelling, map studies, numerous 19th century jobs, schools (Board, National etc), printing techniques, various aspects of the English language, architecture, the media and SO much more.

    Jack the Ripper is a lens through which we can study, in remarkable detail, a particular location at a particular moment in history.

    As well as the fascinating stories of how people have been affected by the case over the years - not just victims, their families and local people, but its long term effects on the media, social reform, attitudes to women, police practices, pop culture and again, so much more.

    So as well as a nice little collection of books specifically about JTR, I have many more on all sorts of related subjects.

    My father's culling of my little book inheritance all those years ago, ironically led to my current, ridiculously large, collection.
    I think I am with you on this one, JtR has been the lens through which to see so many different things. Never really been set on one particular suspect, though of late I have become more and more interested in finding who MJK really was.

    Tristan

    Leave a comment:


  • erobitha
    replied
    I am attracted to things regarded as unsolvable. This case bing the most historically famous.

    I have a tenacious stubbornness that wants to understand and learn the truth. Often we regard things as unsolvable as we choose not to see or miss the things that show us that truth.

    During the height of his own murdering spree, Bundy was reported to the police on numerous occasions as being a potential lead but he was dismissed because of his political and educational background. It was impossible for a smart good-looking man to commit such horrific crimes. Well he did. And he was one of the worst and most prolific of all.

    Yet we still persist with this pre-conception that only someone insane or with an obvious history of similar violence could be capable of this. History since has shown us this not to be so, but the crazy eyed Jew myth persists even to this day.

    Leave a comment:


  • harry
    replied
    An interest is that I might have known and met him or passed him in the street.Quite possible ,as age,his old, mine young might have provided this possibility.

    Leave a comment:


  • GUT
    replied
    I’ve told the story before but my Great Grandmother, on mums side was born in 1888 and always said she was the reason behind it all, jokingly.

    My great uncle on Dad’s side, told me that our family knew who Jack was, I was about 10 or 12 at the time, and had no interest, now wish I had followed up. There are, that I have found 2 possibilities that could fit. But of course it could still be Mr U. N. Known.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azarna
    replied
    When I was about 10 or 11, a family friend died and left me some boxes of old books. My father, in his wisdom, decided we didn't need that many more books in the house and scrapped many of them, leaving just the children's books.

    Tucked in one of the previous remaining books was a yellowed newspaper article, from the early 1890s, talking about Jack the Ripper. I was very intrigued and had to find out more!

    My local library had given me adult library cards (totally against the rules, of course, heh) so I was able to get my paws on a couple of books with more about the case.

    And now, 40 years later, I still have "the bug".

    Whilst I have never had a "pet suspect", nor felt that the murderer will ever be identified, that didn't matter.,

    For me, it is that studying "all things Ripper" has opened so many doors and introduced me to so many other fascinating things.

    Some topics I have enjoyed learning more about, thanks to this case, are early photography, the history of the police force, everyday life in 19th Century London, the poor (Booth, social welfare etc), women's suffrage, sex workers, all sorts of aspects of forensics, 3d modelling, map studies, numerous 19th century jobs, schools (Board, National etc), printing techniques, various aspects of the English language, architecture, the media and SO much more.

    Jack the Ripper is a lens through which we can study, in remarkable detail, a particular location at a particular moment in history.

    As well as the fascinating stories of how people have been affected by the case over the years - not just victims, their families and local people, but its long term effects on the media, social reform, attitudes to women, police practices, pop culture and again, so much more.

    So as well as a nice little collection of books specifically about JTR, I have many more on all sorts of related subjects.

    My father's culling of my little book inheritance all those years ago, ironically led to my current, ridiculously large, collection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ms Diddles
    replied
    Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

    I enjoyed it at the time as a good introduction to the case. It’s been years since I read it though. There are so many books being churned out these days that you could spend every bit of spare cash on them. Some of them are awful but we do get some worthwhile ones (Jacob the Ripper and The Escape...for eg). I’ve got around 320 or so but I think that I only bought 3 or 4 last year. I’ll get Fisherman’s book but I don’t know of any others on the horizon? I’ve been buying a few historical true crime books recently, all reasonably priced. Plus there’s a new one on the Wallace case out on Wednesday which I pre-ordered.
    Ahhh! Yes!

    I've been meaning to give Jacob the Ripper a go.

    I'm very much looking forward to Fisherman's book too!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X