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The WM in a travel narrative

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  • The WM in a travel narrative

    Just found interesting mentions of the Whitechapel murders in Jules Paul Tardiavel ("Notes de Voyage en France, Italie, Espagne, Irlande, Angleterre et Hollande", ed. E. Senécal, Montreal, Canada, 1890).

    Worth noting is that Tardiavel arrived in London on 29 September 1888, leaving on 6 October.
    He was there at the time of the double-event, to which he alludes.

    Tardiavel is quite well-known as one of the first promoters of Québec nationalism. Among his literary works, there is a translation of Stevenson's Jekyll, published in Canada in 1888.


    page 75 :

    "Singulière transition, penserez-vous : mais je dois vous dire un mot du principal sujet de conversation à Londres en ce moment. Depuis quelques semaines il y a eu, dans un des quartiers de Londres appelé Whitechapel, une série de meurtres épouvantable, deux encore dans la nuit de samedi à dimanche. Cela fait huit, je crois. Les détails sont trop horribles pour que je vous les donne. Ce qui inquiète le plus l'opinion, c'est qu'on ne trouve pas les auteurs de ces assassinats : ou plutôt l'auteur, car plusieurs de ces meurtres paraissent être l'oeuvre du même individu : les corps des victimes sont mutilés de la même manière. Comme on ne découvre aucun motif pour expliquer ces étranges et dégoûtants assassinats, on suppose que c'est le fait d'un fou possédé de la manie homicide. Peut-être si ces meurtres avaient lieu à Dublin, serait-on moins empressé de les attribuer à la folie. On les appellerait plutôt outrages.
    Le district de Whitechapel est un des plus mauvais de Londres. Je me propose de faire une excursion de ce côté-là demain. Ne craignez pas que je m'expose : l'endroit est rempli de gardiens de la paix qui vous accompagnent, au besoin, par les rues les plus scabreuses.
    J'ai vu le beau et le riche, à l'ouest ; je veux maintenant jeter un coup d'oeil sur les quartiers misérables, à l'est."



    page 79 :

    "J'aurais voulu visiter ensuite le quartier de Whitechapel et les docks, mais je ne me suis pas rendu très loin dans mon exploration, car la pluie augmentant, la circulation dans ces rues mal pavées devenait impossible.
    Je suis donc revenu à mon hôtel et j'ai consacré le reste de l'après-midi à lire les lettres et les journaux que je viens de recevoir du Canada. Cela valait mieux que les gens de Whitechapel, que j'ai vus d'assez près pour ne pas les admirer.
    La population de ce quartier, bien que je n'aie pas quitté la rue principale, qui a assez bonne apparence, m'a paru pauvre et triste. On dit que dans les ruelles en arrière, les slams (sic), il règne une misère et une démoralisation incroyables sur lesquelles les hautes classes de la société londonienne ferment les yeux pour n'être pas offusquées par cette vue qui est certainement shocking."


    Amitiés all,
    David
    Last edited by DVV; 01-23-2010, 01:32 AM.

  • #2
    Hello David,

    Very nice find from something so early. Well done!

    best wishes

    Phil
    Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


    Justice for the 96 = achieved
    Accountability? ....

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, Phil,

      yes, it's a nice piece. Perhaps the whole chapter should be placed in the "Victorian London" section.

      Amitiés,
      David

      Comment


      • #4
        David, Phil,

        I feel like I am missing out! Any chance I can view it translated in English?

        Yours truly
        Washington Irving:

        "To a homeless man, who has no spot on this wide world which he can truly call his own, there is a momentary feeling of something like independence and territorial consequence, when, after a weary day's travel, he kicks off his boots, thrusts his feet into slippers, and stretches himself before an inn fire. Let the world without go as it may; let kingdoms rise and fall, so long as he has the wherewithal to pay his bills, he is, for the time being, the very monarch of all he surveys. The arm chair in his throne; the poker his sceptre, and the little parlour of some twelve feet square, his undisputed empire. "

        Stratford-on-Avon

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Corey,

          My English is too poor, I'm afraid.

          Amitiés,
          David

          Comment


          • #6
            David,

            Thats ok. thanks for posting it though.

            Yours truly
            Washington Irving:

            "To a homeless man, who has no spot on this wide world which he can truly call his own, there is a momentary feeling of something like independence and territorial consequence, when, after a weary day's travel, he kicks off his boots, thrusts his feet into slippers, and stretches himself before an inn fire. Let the world without go as it may; let kingdoms rise and fall, so long as he has the wherewithal to pay his bills, he is, for the time being, the very monarch of all he surveys. The arm chair in his throne; the poker his sceptre, and the little parlour of some twelve feet square, his undisputed empire. "

            Stratford-on-Avon

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by corey123 View Post
              David, Phil,

              I feel like I am missing out! Any chance I can view it translated in English?

              Yours truly
              Corry
              Here is a rough translation courtesy of MS Word translation service

              but I have to say a word in the main topic of conversation in London at this time. For a few weeks there has been, in one of the districts of London called Whitechapel, a series of appalling murders, two on Saturday to Sunday night. It is eight, I think. The details are too horrible for me to give them to you. What is worrying about the main opinion, is that there is not the authors of these murders: or rather the author, because several of these killings appear to be the work of the same individual: the bodies of the victims are mutilated the same way. As we find no reason to explain these strange and disgusting killings, it is assumed that it is a madman possessed of homicidal mania. Perhaps if these murders were held in Dublin, it would be less promptly assigned to madness. It would rather outrages.
              The Whitechapel district is one of the worst of London. I propose to make a tour of this side here tomorrow. Do not be afraid I exposes me: the place is full of peace guardians accompanying you, if necessary, by the scabreuses streets.
              I saw the beautiful and the rich West; I now want to take a look at wretched districts to the East."



              page 79:

              "I liked my visit the Whitechapel district and the" docks, but I do not travelled very far in my exploration, because the rain, increasing traffic in these poorly cobbled streets became impossible.
              I therefore returned to my hotel and I spent the rest of the afternoon reading the letters and newspapers that I have just received the Canada. This was better than the people of Whitechapel, I have seen quite closely to not admire.
              The people of this district, although I've not left the main street. has fairly good appearance seemed poor and sad. It is said that in the alleys in the back, slams (sic), there is a misery and a incredible demoralization on which high-London society classes close the eyes not be offended by this view which is certainly "shocking."


              All the best

              Dave

              When you talk to god it's praying; when god talks to you its schizophrenia! - X-Files

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DVV View Post
                My English is too poor, I'm afraid.
                Bollocks, mon ami.

                Your English is brilliant. Please translate this toots sweet.
                allisvanityandvexationofspirit

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Stephen,

                  MS word translation isn't so bad (thanks Dave)...

                  I've also found out several articles from the French press.
                  One published after the Pinchin Street discovery is most fascinating, the journalist having been introduced to Moore, Swanson and Williamson.
                  He then makes some sort of Ripper tour with Williamson.
                  It's quite a long piece and I'll try to copy and translate it as soon as possible.

                  Good day all,
                  David

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dave James View Post
                    The people of this district, although I've not left the main street. has fairly good appearance seemed poor and sad.
                    In fact it's one sentence, the main street - not the people - "having good appearance".

                    "The people of the district, although I haven't left the main street, which has fairly good appearance, seemed to me poor and sad."

                    Amitiés,
                    David

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DVV View Post
                      I've also found out several articles from the French press.
                      Hi David

                      I'm sure we would all like to see these and if you have any worries about grammar or whatever in your translations please feel free to run them by me via PM and all will be well.

                      Best wishes
                      allisvanityandvexationofspirit

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Marché conclu !

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Always look down the post

                          I spent ages reading the French and trying to translate it and then found a translation down the thread.
                          Its a nice piece and I think it is interesting that they made the comment about Dublin. I wonder why they thought this.
                          In order to know virtue, we must first aquaint ourselves with vice!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DVV View Post
                            Marché conclu !
                            Deal done!
                            allisvanityandvexationofspirit

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KatBradshaw View Post
                              I spent ages reading the French and trying to translate it and then found a translation down the thread.
                              Its a nice piece and I think it is interesting that they made the comment about Dublin. I wonder why they thought this.
                              Kat,
                              I would presume because of the ongoing 'unrest', and specifically the Phoenix Park murders of 1882, in which two British politicians/diplomats were 'butchered', apparently using surgical knives (I've heard of the same make as Don Rumbelow's).
                              Regards,
                              Harry

                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Park_Murders
                              aye aye! keep yer 'and on yer pfennig!

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