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The Batty Street Lodger

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  • #16
    The Batty Street Lodger has for me always seemed a much better fit for The Torso Killer rather than the Ripper.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by John Wheat View Post
      The Batty Street Lodger has for me always seemed a much better fit for The Torso Killer rather than the Ripper.
      I'm pretty well convinced that the committer of the Torso crimes and the Ripper murders were one of the same. If you stop looking at the individual cases but look at them for a common characteristics, the torso crimes and the Ripper murders have a consistency to them. How the crimes were committed could well have changed due to how difficult it was becoming to pull them off, due to the increasing police presence.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by SuspectZero View Post

        I'm pretty well convinced that the committer of the Torso crimes and the Ripper murders were one of the same. If you stop looking at the individual cases but look at them for a common characteristics, the torso crimes and the Ripper murders have a consistency to them. How the crimes were committed could well have changed due to how difficult it was becoming to pull them off, due to the increasing police presence.
        I disagree the mutilations by the Ripper seems very different to the dismemberment and dumping of body parts by the Torso Killer.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by John Wheat View Post

          I disagree the mutilations by the Ripper seems very different to the dismemberment and dumping of body parts by the Torso Killer.
          I understand why you think that, and I respect your opinion, but consider that if you are looking at specific details of the mutilations as comparative, then you are right, there is less resemblance. However, if you pull up for a moment and consider that maybe the reason they were murdered was not about the mutilations/methodology, but really about motive, you might consider it from a different perspective? From that standpoint, they are similar, if the goal was to steal body parts. The perpetrator merely changed opportunity from the street to someplace more private. Take a look at all the women that just disappeared off the streets at that time. Body parts were a known and profitable business. A lot of people looked the other way.
          Last edited by SuspectZero; 08-17-2019, 06:28 PM.

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          • #20
            It must have been a very profitable business indeed, if the killer could afford to take just one or two body parts from each corpse and then throw the rest away.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by SuspectZero View Post

              I understand why you think that, and I respect your opinion, but consider that if you are looking at specific details of the mutilations as comparative, then you are right, there is less resemblance. However, if you pull up for a moment and consider that maybe the reason they were murdered was not about the mutilations/methodology, but really about motive, you might consider it from a different perspective? From that standpoint, they are similar, if the goal was to steal body parts. The perpetrator merely changed opportunity from the street to someplace more private. Take a look at all the women that just disappeared off the streets at that time. Body parts were a known and profitable business. A lot of people looked the other way.
              But the 1832 Anatomy Act was brought in to stop the illegal trade in body parts for medical research. It allowed bona fide medical personnel to be able to go to mortuaries and legally obtain body parts for research. So it wekened the supply and demand aspect previously seen with Burke and Hare.

              www.trevormarriott.co.uk

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Trevor Marriott View Post

                But the 1832 Anatomy Act was brought in to stop the illegal trade in body parts for medical research. It allowed bona fide medical personnel to be able to go to mortuaries and legally obtain body parts for research. So it wekened the supply and demand aspect previously seen with Burke and Hare.

                www.trevormarriott.co.uk
                Absolutely correct, Trevor. However it continued to be a back door supply chain. If specific parts weren't available, they could be more valuable procuring them through the back door.

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