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  • Introduction

    Hello all,
    My name is Cheryl and I thought it prudent to introduce myself before I started posting comments. I have trolled the boards for a bit and must admit I’m rather impressed with the vast amount of knowledge and research so many of you have on JtR . I have always had a passing curiosity of JtR and the various and competing theories there are in regards to the case. I hesitate to admit this (please remember I ‘m but a lowly neophyte concerning the case before you either laugh in derision or think me a complete idiot) but I did buy Cromwell’s book when it first came out. I thought her “evidence” and research left a lot to be desired. It was as though she picked a suspect and then stretched the facts of the case to fit and/or back up her theory /suspect. As part of the unwashed masses I was under the impression that many people agreed with her and quickly moved onto other interests. What can I say I’m a genius! Ha
    It wasn’t until recently that my interest was piqued once again and I started seriously looking into JtR again. Needless to say I was quite pleased when I stumbled upon the site and found, to my utter enjoyment, that I wasn’t the only one who felt that way about Cromwell. This was quickly followed by my complete chagrin that I didn’t take the time to research it more way back when. I find myself shaking my head and rolling my eyes at myself. Not an easy feat to admit but there it is…..
    Since I am still a neophyte I haven’t formulated any concrete thoughts or theories about the case. That said I do know what I don’t believe. I don’t think there was a vast conspiracy, a royal connection, or that JtR was someone famous and I most emphatically do not believe a sycophant French doctor went on murderous revenge rampage just to appease his benefactors (forgive me, I just couldn’t help myself). Other than that I’m pretty open to new ideas and theories with the caveat that they are logical and have research to back it/them up.
    I look forward to sharing ideas with you all and humbly ask for forgiveness if/when I ask questions that seem rudimentary to all of you. I will try to keep those at a minimum.

  • #2
    Hi Cheryl

    I think you mean Cornwell rather than Cromwell, but whatever, welcome to the boards!

    Lots of us bought Cornwell's book when it came out, and most of us ended up feeling the same way about it as you do...nothing to feel daft about, and that you sussed her out does you credit!

    As regards the rest, I've not been on here long myself, but I've generally found most people genuinely helpful and only too eager to help

    All the best

    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      Its Cornwall goddamit.

      Monty
      Monty

      https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...t/evilgrin.gif

      Author of Capturing Jack the Ripper.

      http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1445621622

      Comment


      • #4
        welcome

        Hello Callie. Welcome to the boards.

        Happy hunting!

        Cheers.
        LC

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Callie,

          Welcome to Casebook. There's no such thing as a silly question if you don't know the answer. You've joined a world of friendly discussion but also, on occasion, heated debate. Anyone who wants theories based on logic and research is alright by me.
          Dave (Cogidubnus) is one of the best btw. A top bloke. (Same goes for Lynn & Monty)

          Regards, Bridewell.
          "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Monty View Post
            Its Cornwall goddamit.

            Monty
            Is that Somerset Maugham's alter ego?

            Regards, Bridewell
            "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

            Comment


            • #7
              Dave,

              First, thank you for the warm welcome! And thank you for catching that! I’m afraid I have been fully immersed in research on Oliver Cromwell today and wrote his name instead of Cornwell’s.

              Regards,

              Cheryl

              Comment


              • #8
                Monty,

                Eghads! What a mistake to make while trying to introduce myself. So sorry, Oliver Cromwell on my mind today....

                Lynn, thank you for the welcome.

                Bridewell- Thank you for the welcome and encouragment! Btw, from reading several of your posts I think you fit right up there with Dave, Lynn and Monty.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cromwell on your mind Cheryl?

                  I had Georgia on mine.

                  Thank you (and Colin) for the kind words, but Neil Bell is far better than I.

                  Monty
                  Monty

                  https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...t/evilgrin.gif

                  Author of Capturing Jack the Ripper.

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1445621622

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I’m afraid I have been fully immersed in research on Oliver Cromwell today and wrote his name instead of Cornwell’s.
                    What a fascinating character, and what a fascinating period in our history besides...Cromwell. Our Chief of Men (Antonia Fraser) is somewhere upstairs on our bedroom shelves as I write...if you haven't read it yet, it's well worth a go...

                    Personally I've always gone more for Pepys and the restoration, but the whole 17th Century period shows Britain at it's very worst...and ultimately by contrast best...all the ineptitudes are finally addressed and Jan Morris's empire is ultimately built...

                    My other interest in the era is probably more boring...the founding (with the restoration) of the General Letter Office (now the Post Office) in 1660...I'm a philatelist and as such am interested in the history of postage as much as stamps...and this is SUCH a significant time...

                    Whatever (probably bored the backside off you!)

                    Best wishes

                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My other interest in the era is probably more boring...the founding (with the restoration) of the General Letter Office (now the Post Office) in 1660...I'm a philatelist and as such am interested in the history of postage as much as stamps...and this is SUCH a significant time...
                      Hi Dave,

                      I worked for Royal Mail for three and a half years. It used to be a great firm to work for, but the workforce, sadly, is much demoralised by current management practises. (Animal Farm is a good analogy).

                      Regards, Bridewell.
                      "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Monty View Post
                        Cromwell on your mind Cheryl?

                        I had Georgia on mine.

                        Thank you (and Colin) for the kind words, but Neil Bell is far better than I.

                        Monty
                        Monty,

                        I am confident that Neil is your equal in every respect. There's nothing to choose between you.

                        Regards. Colin.
                        "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dave,
                          First let me tell you that you haven’t bored me in the least! I know about the General Letter Office but I can say with great certainty that as a philatelist your knowledge on the subject is vastly greater than mine. I would love to hear more about it from you at some point.

                          Cromwell is an interesting character and I have read Fraser’s book more than once. Excellent book!

                          Like I think the 17th century was an amazing time of change and I have always found Pepys to be more interesting than Cromwell. His dairy is an amazing primary source on the Restoration. Alas, he left out his complicity in the whole tickets to pay seaman debacle during the 2nd Anglo- Dutch war. But his insight on the Great Plague of 1665 and the Fire of London in 1666 is invaluable to historians and lay people alike.

                          As much as I enjoy researching that time period my real affinity lies with WWII, Henry VIII (poor Anne lost her head on this date) and the first year of the American Revolution. Now, I’m going to stop rambling before I bore you to death.

                          Regards,
                          Cheryl

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dickens

                            Hello Callie. Interestingly, Cromwell is one of only a few British rulers that Charles Dickens spoke kindly of. Shocking.

                            Cheers.
                            LC

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ye Olden Daze

                              Hi Callie, welcome to Casebook! I hope you will enjoy your time here.

                              By the way, I lurked for a couple of years before joining. How does it feel now that you've taken the plunge and met a few members? (Between you and me, Lynn's the only scary one.)

                              So you're a philatelist and a postal historian...interesting. I've met kids that have never written, stamped and mailed a letter; all they know is text messaging & emails. Some kids can barely grasp the concept that there was life before smartphones!

                              I try to do my bit teaching them about the olden days... Like what life was like in the 1990's.

                              Best regards,
                              Archaic

                              PS: Is a person with an extreme love of stamp-collecting a philatelophiliac??

                              Comment

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