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  • Just had an earthquake in DC area

    anyone in this area feel it?

    Weird feeling.

  • #2
    Hi Abby.

    I read a little while ago that one was felt in Colorado and was the biggest they'd had for a number of years- I think it was a 5.3.

    Washington D.C. seems a bit far away for you to have felt the same one, but perhaps it was related?

    I'm sure everything will be fine, but any small quake is a good reminder to review your emergency plans, coordinate with your family, etc.

    Take care,
    Archaic

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Abby- gosh, it was a 5.9 in D.C.!

      http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/23...ashington-d-c/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Archaic View Post
        Hi Abby.

        I read a little while ago that one was felt in Colorado and was the biggest they'd had for a number of years- I think it was a 5.3.

        Washington D.C. seems a bit far away for you to have felt the same one, but perhaps it was related?

        I'm sure everything will be fine, but any small quake is a good reminder to review your emergency plans, coordinate with your family, etc.

        Take care,
        Archaic
        Hi Archaic
        We just had a quake in this area last year but it was only a 3.6-but still very spooky. Todays was a 6.o which is big for this area. Quakes are not unheard of in this area but they are very rare and usually happen like 10 years apart. As a matter of fact the one last year and todays are the only ones i can remember and I have lived hear for over 30 years.

        As my father in law says, with all the freaky weather/natural disasters lately-The world is coming to an end! 2012 is just around the corner.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Archaic View Post
          Hi Abby- gosh, it was a 5.9 in D.C.!

          http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/23...ashington-d-c/
          yeah I heard they evacuated the Pentagon-i think they thought it was under attack again.

          Comment


          • #6
            Time Expansion & Animal Behavior

            Hi Abby.

            Yeah, 5.9 or 6.0 is quite large for the East Coast.

            I vividly remember the 2001 Nisqually Quake in Seattle. It had a magnitude of 6.8 and shook us so hard that my huge house felt like it went for a rollercoaster ride! It was built into a hill on one side, and it felt like that hill and the ground beneath us turned to jelly- I'm amazed the house stayed on its foundation.

            The Nisqually quake officially lasted for 45 seconds-1 minute, but that was the longest minute I ever experienced. Quakes usually happen so fast that they're already over by the time you realize what's happening. The Nisqually quake lasted such a long time that we were able to have an actual conversation about how long it was lasting as we braced ourselves in the hallway! I had time to think of and do so many things...strange how time can seem to expand.

            Did you notice any animals acted oddly before the quake?

            That phenomenon always intrigues me. My horse was noticeably restless & excited, galloping around for no reason, and my old dog was particularly clingy for a couple of days before the Nisqually quake. I noticed it and wondered, but I didn't put two and two together until the quake hit... Now I pay closer attention!

            Best regards,
            Archaic

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Archaic View Post
              Hi Abby.

              Yeah, 5.9 or 6.0 is quite large for the East Coast.

              I vividly remember the 2001 Nisqually Quake in Seattle. It had a magnitude of 6.8 and shook us so hard that my huge house felt like it went for a rollercoaster ride! It was built into a hill on one side, and it felt like that hill and the ground beneath us turned to jelly- I'm amazed the house stayed on its foundation.

              The Nisqually quake officially lasted for 45 seconds-1 minute, but that was the longest minute I ever experienced. Quakes usually happen so fast that they're already over by the time you realize what's happening. The Nisqually quake lasted such a long time that we were able to have an actual conversation about how long it was lasting as we braced ourselves in the hallway! I had time to think of and do so many things...strange how time can seem to expand.

              Did you notice any animals acted oddly before the quake?

              That phenomenon always intrigues me. My horse was noticeably restless & excited, galloping around for no reason, and my old dog was particularly clingy for a couple of days before the Nisqually quake. I noticed it and wondered, but I didn't put two and two together until the quake hit... Now I pay closer attention!

              Best regards,
              Archaic
              Hi
              This one was over in a few seconds but was more violent, clunky and shaky. last years was longer but was more of a prolongend loud vibration. It really struck me how different the two felt.

              Did you notice any animals acted oddly before the quake

              No, but my dog was going nuts during.


              so far no aftershocks, but i tell you it really makes you realize how small you are compared to mother nature.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm all the way in Buffalo NY and we felt the earthquake here...not fun.. but it was very mild here... I do hope everyone is ok where you are Abby

                Steadmund Brand
                "The truth is what is, and what should be is a fantasy. A terrible, terrible lie that someone gave to the people long ago."- Lenny Bruce

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well I live in D.C. and I can tell you that I felt it big time. At first it was just a noise and a vibration and I thought it was just a jet plane. But both the noise and the vibrations grew in intensity and my apartment started to shake. I ran into the closet to get away from the windows. Scared the hell out of me. Went out into the streets and there were people all about. I ended up talking to my neighbors in my apartment building which I have never done before. It makes a difference when everyone is in the same boat. They say expect a few small aftershocks but so far all's well that ends well. Let's hope it stays that way.

                  c.d.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by c.d. View Post
                    Scared the hell out of me. Went out into the streets and there were people all about. I ended up talking to my neighbors in my apartment building which I have never done before. It makes a difference when everyone is in the same boat. They say expect a few small aftershocks but so far all's well that ends well. Let's hope it stays that way.

                    c.d.
                    Hi C.D. & Steadmund, glad you're alright.

                    C.D., that's sort of the saving grace of disasters and near-disasters, isn't it? You stop living in isolation and start talking to your neighbors.

                    I always go out of my way to make friends with my neighbors wherever I live, but I know in big cities people tend to get out of the habit of talking to strangers until disaster strikes, then everyone comes together.

                    Take care, I'm glad everyone's OK.

                    best regards,
                    Archaic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Archaic,

                      Thanks for the kind words.

                      It now looks like the worst of it is that we are getting some smart ass comments from the West Coast directed our way saying that we overreacted. Let them get a few terrorist attacks and some blizzards under their belt before they mouth off. Little punks.

                      c.d.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by c.d. View Post
                        Well I live in D.C. and I can tell you that I felt it big time. At first it was just a noise and a vibration and I thought it was just a jet plane. But both the noise and the vibrations grew in intensity and my apartment started to shake. I ran into the closet to get away from the windows. Scared the hell out of me. Went out into the streets and there were people all about. I ended up talking to my neighbors in my apartment building which I have never done before. It makes a difference when everyone is in the same boat. They say expect a few small aftershocks but so far all's well that ends well. Let's hope it stays that way.

                        c.d.
                        Hi CD
                        Glad you are OK and nothing was damaged. i always used to say we live in one of the safest areas in the US (and the world) when it comes to the weather and natural disasters. We get the odd tornado and blizzard or summer thunderstorm/remnants of a hurricane. But with these earthquakes(2 in the last year), tornado warnings on a weekly basis, the ridiculous snowstorms of 2 winters ago(my house took a major beating on that one) and apparantly the hurricane headed our way (keeping my fingers crossed on that one) I am not so sure.

                        My father in law half jokingly says its the end of the world (2012) but my sister mentioned global warming and wondered if it might be also causing the slew of earthquakes recently-here, colorodo, the japan and indonesia earthquakes/tsunamis etc. I think it could have something to do with it-as in the whole world is heating up and causing more activity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by c.d. View Post
                          Hi Archaic,

                          Thanks for the kind words.

                          It now looks like the worst of it is that we are getting some smart ass comments from the West Coast directed our way saying that we overreacted. Let them get a few terrorist attacks and some blizzards under their belt before they mouth off. Little punks.

                          c.d.
                          Haha.
                          True-but cut them some slack-along with eartrhquakes, they have to deal with the mudslides, avalanches, forest fires, and Arnold Schwartzenager.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            HAHHHA great post Abby... I'll cut them some slack for sure... being in Buffalo.. the blizzard capital of the world (well our last few winters have been very mild I must say) we always tell people... snow melts so we can take it... but you are right.. the wild fires and mudslides.... no thanks...

                            Also, I actually work in insurance and I want to tell eveyone on the east coast to get ready... this storm could get very nasty, and hit NY,NJ,DE.CT not to mention north and south carolina....fingers crossed it is *possible* that the storm misses land.. but please everyone, be safe....

                            Steadmund Brand
                            "The truth is what is, and what should be is a fantasy. A terrible, terrible lie that someone gave to the people long ago."- Lenny Bruce

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              http://jmckinley.posterous.com/dc-ea...ke-devastation

                              our hearts go out to those in our nation's capitol.
                              The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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