Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Couple of older true crime books

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Couple of older true crime books

    I have been working from home since last March, and am currently working on selecting outdated books to be removed from our community college library. "Weeding" is the librarians term, lol.

    I came across these two, and thought I would share the titles in case anyone is interested.

    "A Violent Act" by Alec Wilkins is a 1994 book about a 1986 incident in Indiana. Mike Wayne Jackson was a mentally-ill ex-convict who visited his probation officer, got into an argument, and fatally shot the man. He then went on what the papers called a "crime rampage" for some days, eventually killing himself.

    "Mean Justice" by Edward Humes is the story of Patrick O'Doyle Dunn, a Bakersfield, California man who in 1992 was accused, and wrongfully convicted, of the murder of his wife. From what I can make out, the local district attorney was corrupt. I think this book is from 1996? (Didn't write that down)

    They just sounded interesting. I hadn't heard of either case.
    Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
    ---------------
    Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
    ---------------

  • #2
    Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
    I have been working from home since last March, and am currently working on selecting outdated books to be removed from our community college library. "Weeding" is the librarians term, lol.

    I came across these two, and thought I would share the titles in case anyone is interested.

    "A Violent Act" by Alec Wilkins is a 1994 book about a 1986 incident in Indiana. Mike Wayne Jackson was a mentally-ill ex-convict who visited his probation officer, got into an argument, and fatally shot the man. He then went on what the papers called a "crime rampage" for some days, eventually killing himself.

    "Mean Justice" by Edward Humes is the story of Patrick O'Doyle Dunn, a Bakersfield, California man who in 1992 was accused, and wrongfully convicted, of the murder of his wife. From what I can make out, the local district attorney was corrupt. I think this book is from 1996? (Didn't write that down)

    They just sounded interesting. I hadn't heard of either case.
    Hey PC, I haven't heard of either, but I notice that a new H/B copy of the book is selling for over 100 on Amazon, so if the copy you are talking about is in good condition it might be worth a few quid.

    Amazon link attached.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Violent-Act...s&sr=1-1-spell

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the info, Barnflat. They are actual library books and not mine to dispose of, unfortunately. But true crime is always a popular field, it seems.

      I noticed the Jackson case was apparently notorious enough for at least two articles about it to appear in the New York Times. They came up while I was researching for more info (being a very curious librarian, lol)
      Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
      ---------------
      Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
      ---------------

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
        Thanks for the info, Barnflat. They are actual library books and not mine to dispose of, unfortunately. But true crime is always a popular field, it seems.

        I noticed the Jackson case was apparently notorious enough for at least two articles about it to appear in the New York Times. They came up while I was researching for more info (being a very curious librarian, lol)
        In a previous life I was tasked with setting up the library in Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow.
        The most popular type of books were true crime books, especially Scottish crime, and in particular, Glasgow crime.
        I was puzzled as to why this particular genre was so popular with the residents, until a prison warder explained that the prisoners were particularly keen to read these type of books just to see if they were mentioned by name.​​​​​​​

        Comment


        • #5
          "Mentioned by name"! Well, we all hope for a fleeting bit of fame, don't we?

          I have read articles about prison libraries in professional journals and out here the big problem seems to be a long list of types of reading material that cannot be acquired for the inmates.

          A colleague told me recently he used to receive interlibrary loan requests coming directly from prisoners to his library, which he always had to turn down and tell them to go through their institutional library.
          He felt they were trying to avoid having their reading interests marked down on their records, which I guess the prison library would do. Censorship, eh?

          To be fair, I have also read inspiring accounts from prison librarians who loved their work. I think you would need to be a certain type of person to do it, and I salute you.
          Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
          ---------------
          Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
          ---------------

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
            Thanks for the info, Barnflat. They are actual library books and not mine to dispose of, unfortunately. But true crime is always a popular field, it seems.

            I noticed the Jackson case was apparently notorious enough for at least two articles about it to appear in the New York Times. They came up while I was researching for more info (being a very curious librarian, lol)
            Couldn’t you try and sell it (with permission of course) and use the money on new books for the library Pat?
            Regards

            Herlock



            “All conspiracy theories are the product of the subconscious attempt of an ignorant yet creative mind to counteract the fear of the unknown with the tales of fantasy.” Abhijit Naskar.

            “Conspiracy theorists, she knew, were paranoid by definition, and usually with good reason - they were indeed being watched, largely because they were standing on an upturned bucket, haranguing the sheeple with their wingnut delusions.” Mick Herron.

            ”The most confused you will ever get is when you try to convince your heart and spirit of something your mind knows is a lie.” Shannon L. Alder.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

              Couldn’t you try and sell it (with permission of course) and use the money on new books for the library Pat?
              Exactly Herlock!

              The chances are that it will, at a later date, be withdrawn and discarded by someone who is unaware of it's true value.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by barnflatwyngarde View Post

                Exactly Herlock!

                The chances are that it will, at a later date, be withdrawn and discarded by someone who is unaware of it's true value.
                Well, those prices on Amazon can't be relied on, from what I hear. They are "placeholder" prices that either Amazon or a third party seller puts on something to hold a spot in case the item becomes available again. I would have to ask someone like Abe Books, the dealer in rare and out of print books, if it has any value like that. Books are worth what people will pay, really. And the note said in "new" condition, I think, which a used library book (even uncirculated like most of ours) can't be considered.

                BUT -- the list hasn't gone in yet. I will add a note and ask the Access Librarian to put this title in my office as I would like to have it (The last time we weeded, I hauled home boxes of old books on numerous interesting subjects, not that I have read any of them yet.). I would like to read it and find out if the case changed how probation officers deal wirh clients. I am pretty sure that meeting an ex-offender at the probation officer's own home isn't usual procedure now!

                We are a state academic library, and cannot sell any property belonging to the campus, including library books. We instead use a service of our library consortium which lets us box up unwanted books to go to them. They sort and either send items to other libraries requesting a title, send to used booksellers, or arrange for recycling. We get the benefit of clearing our shelves for newer works, and not having to store old "deselected" books in every nook and cranny.

                I am retiring at the end of June and hope to have more time for reading then!
                Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                ---------------
                Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                ---------------

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                  Couldn’t you try and sell it (with permission of course) and use the money on new books for the library Pat?
                  See my reply to Barnflatwyngarde re our rules on acquiring and disposing of state property (we are a state community college). I think I'll try to keep it, at least.
                  Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                  ---------------
                  Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                  ---------------

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post

                    See my reply to Barnflatwyngarde re our rules on acquiring and disposing of state property (we are a state community college). I think I'll try to keep it, at least.
                    There are some jaw-dropping book prices around Pat. I’m often surprised to see what some books are going for especially when it’s a book that I own. There was one book I’d been after for a while but could never see it for anything less than 60 ($83) which I wasn’t prepared to pay. I picked a copy up online last week for 8 free p+p!
                    Regards

                    Herlock



                    “All conspiracy theories are the product of the subconscious attempt of an ignorant yet creative mind to counteract the fear of the unknown with the tales of fantasy.” Abhijit Naskar.

                    “Conspiracy theorists, she knew, were paranoid by definition, and usually with good reason - they were indeed being watched, largely because they were standing on an upturned bucket, haranguing the sheeple with their wingnut delusions.” Mick Herron.

                    ”The most confused you will ever get is when you try to convince your heart and spirit of something your mind knows is a lie.” Shannon L. Alder.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That is a good deal! Alas, most of our used book shops have vanished, so Amazon and third party dealers are what we bibliophiles may be forced to rely on.
                      Sigh... I liked wandering shops and checking out the offerings in brick and mortar used books places. The thrill of finding something great is so wonderful... And "great" varies from reader to reader!
                      Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                      ---------------
                      Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                      ---------------

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
                        That is a good deal! Alas, most of our used book shops have vanished, so Amazon and third party dealers are what we bibliophiles may be forced to rely on.
                        Sigh... I liked wandering shops and checking out the offerings in brick and mortar used books places. The thrill of finding something great is so wonderful... And "great" varies from reader to reader!
                        Me too!

                        I love a good, leisurely snoop round a book shop.

                        It has been sad watching them disappear from the high street.

                        Years ago, I worked in a book shop for over a decade, and was ultimately made redundant as a result of the proliferation of online book sales and deep discounted titles available from supermarkets.

                        Book shops just can't compete.

                        I'd love to say that I have taken a righteous stance against Amazon and the such like, however I too have succumbed to the ease, convenience and affordability of ordering books online.

                        It does sometimes feel hypocritical.

                        I do still love a good mooch round a charity shop though, and have found some excellent and unexpected bargains over the years.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sellers on Amazon are asking $1300 and up for copies of To Drop a Dime. It makes me wonder why that book has never been reprinted, since it's so sought-after. Maybe the publishers are afraid someone will put out a contract on them?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post


                            I am retiring at the end of June and hope to have more time for reading then!
                            Huh!, good luck with that!

                            Since I've retired last year I've found less time for reading.
                            You'll need to get organized, or rather, I do, if you know what I mean.

                            I don't know how I found time to go to work.

                            Regards, Jon S.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I see one of my all time worst books is now approaching an astonishing $1000.00 Canadian.
                              Jack the Ripper, A New Theory, William Stewart, 1939.
                              https://www.bookfinder.com/search/?a...the%2520ripper
                              And to think I had it in my hands about 50 years ago.

                              I hope no-one is dumb enough to.....
                              Regards, Jon S.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X