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** The Murder of Julia Wallace **

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  • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

    thanks herlock. ive always leaned heavily it was wallace. if i was innocent and i thought someone i knew did it, i would be screaming his name from the rooftops. another little oddity that i see as a clue pointing to wallace.

    kind of like when he leaves it to the maid to tell the police about the missing bar and poker. and being able to suddenly get in as soon as his neighbors see him trying.

    as some of you may know from my posts about the ripper, i also dont go much for phantom suspects when youve got one right in front of your nose. that being said i think the courts got it right eventually as there just dosnt seem to be enough hard evidence to convict.
    Certainly not enough to convict Abby.

    I know you don’t go for phantom suspects (or barking mad conspiracies for that matter)
    Regards

    Herlock



    Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post
      I’ve got 45 minutes of the podcast to go. I can’t recall if it was Graham who questioned how certain we can be about Julia’s age. Mark has stated in the podcast that he has a copy of Julia’s birth certificate which states that she was indeed born in 1861. This is where Murphy got the information from too.
      Hi Herlock ,or fellow posters .I just finished listening to a podcast by NBC on American radio, where the host is interviewing Mark Russell. Is this the same programme currently being alluded too? Thanks
      Last edited by moste; 02-09-2021, 12:39 AM.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by NickB View Post
        Etenguy, Why would he have narrowed down the suspect list if he did not intend to finger Parry? As discussed recently, he did not need to say Julia would only let in acquaintances.
        Just starting to catch up again after my latest absence, so apologies for any repetition. Whether or not Wallace did it, it was definitely in his own interests for the police to have other potential suspects in mind, and as there was no forced entry, the killer had to be someone Julia was happy to invite in. It doesn't sound credible that she'd have let in anyone she didn't recognise, even if he called himself Qualtrough and Wallace had mentioned the name earlier. Mr Q was supposedly unknown to Wallace too, so Julia could have been suspicious if he turned up on her doorstep, when he was meant to be waiting for Wallace at his own address.

        It also had to be someone who knew about the cash box and where it was kept, which again points to a previous visitor, who'd have been recognised by Julia and would give her no inkling about his motives.

        This all points to a killer who was familiar with the Wallaces and their house, without Wallace needing to emphasise the fact. It was good and bad for him in equal measure, but there was no doing anything about that. If he pointed the finger too hard or too fast at Parry, or one of his ilk, it might have looked like special pleading. All he needed to say was that Julia would not have invited in any Tom, Dick or Harry, and let the police join up the dots.

        Doesn't the reasonable doubt defence come into play if there is a possibility of someone other than Wallace doing the deed? If so, that someone - whether it's Parry, or some unknown person - wouldn't need to become a formal suspect, or to be eliminated, for this defence to work.

        Love,

        Caz
        X
        Last edited by caz; 02-09-2021, 09:46 AM.
        "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


        Comment


        • Hi Caz,

          indeed, the reasonable doubt was that William didn't o it...therefore the successful appeal... however the prosecution was so woeful...the questions not asked etc...

          Comment


          • Originally posted by moste View Post

            Hi Herlock ,or fellow posters .I just finished listening to a podcast by NBC on American radio, where the host is interviewing Mark Russell. Is this the same programme currently being alluded too? Thanks
            Hi Moste,

            The interviewer on the Casebook podcast is Jonathan Menges who is American with another American involved in the conversation (Tom Wescott) It’s possible that Mark was interviewed by someone else though of course.

            Regards

            Herlock



            Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by caz View Post

              Just starting to catch up again after my latest absence, so apologies for any repetition. Whether or not Wallace did it, it was definitely in his own interests for the police to have other potential suspects in mind, and as there was no forced entry, the killer had to be someone Julia was happy to invite in. It doesn't sound credible that she'd have let in anyone she didn't recognise, even if he called himself Qualtrough and Wallace had mentioned the name earlier. Mr Q was supposedly unknown to Wallace too, so Julia could have been suspicious if he turned up on her doorstep, when he was meant to be waiting for Wallace at his own address.

              It also had to be someone who knew about the cash box and where it was kept, which again points to a previous visitor, who'd have been recognised by Julia and would give her no inkling about his motives.

              This all points to a killer who was familiar with the Wallaces and their house, without Wallace needing to emphasise the fact. It was good and bad for him in equal measure, but there was no doing anything about that. If he pointed the finger too hard or too fast at Parry, or one of his ilk, it might have looked like special pleading. All he needed to say was that Julia would not have invited in any Tom, Dick or Harry, and let the police join up the dots.

              Doesn't the reasonable doubt defence come into play if there is a possibility of someone other than Wallace doing the deed? If so, that someone - whether it's Parry, or some unknown person - wouldn't need to become a formal suspect, or to be eliminated, for this defence to work.

              Love,

              Caz
              X
              if wallace did it, and tries to accuse someone else like parry, and that person ends up having an alibi than thats not good for wallace.its actually pretty bad for him.
              if wallace is innocent and thinks Parry did it he wouldnt care either way.if parry has an alibi. ok cross him off the list. might even be a relief to him that it wasnt someone he knows. and a suspect is eliminated, but at least your getting somewhere.

              that wallace didnt scream his name from the start seems to me to point to the former, wallaces guilt. he knows parry didnt do it, but dosnt know if he has an alibi. better be quiet about accusing him or others.
              "Is all that we see or seem
              but a dream within a dream?"

              -Edgar Allan Poe


              "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
              quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

              -Frederick G. Abberline

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                Hi Moste,

                The interviewer on the Casebook podcast is Jonathan Menges who is American with another American involved in the conversation (Tom Wescott) It’s possible that Mark was interviewed by someone else though of course.
                Mark was interviewed recently by Alan R Warren of the American House of Mystery podcast, KCAA 106.5 F.M. Los Angeles/ 102.3 F.M. Riverside/1050 A.M. Palm Springs.

                Best wishes
                Adam

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                  Hi Moste,

                  The interviewer on the Casebook podcast is Jonathan Menges who is American with another American involved in the conversation (Tom Wescott) It’s possible that Mark was interviewed by someone else though of course.
                  Thanks, that’s the one.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by AdamNeilWood View Post

                    Mark was interviewed recently by Alan R Warren of the American House of Mystery podcast, KCAA 106.5 F.M. Los Angeles/ 102.3 F.M. Riverside/1050 A.M. Palm Springs.

                    Best wishes
                    Adam
                    Thanks for that Adam
                    Regards

                    Herlock



                    Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by AdamNeilWood View Post

                      Mark was interviewed recently by Alan R Warren of the American House of Mystery podcast, KCAA 106.5 F.M. Los Angeles/ 102.3 F.M. Riverside/1050 A.M. Palm Springs.

                      Best wishes
                      Adam
                      Thanks.

                      Comment


                      • I wonder if it was checked out whether Wallace owned a bicycle. I’m surprised actually that his very extensive rounds were not traversed by bike. If he owned a bike but chose not to normally use it for his job, it would certainly have cut his journey time to his first tram to Allerton to 2 or 3 minutes. Just lean the bike against the wall near the tram stop and forget about it. Just a thought.

                        Comment


                        • I noted,Mark mentioned the chess club absences by Wallace, as 2 months ,but games were scheduled for 2 per week, and Wallace had missed 4 that equals 2 weeks to my reckoning.??

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by moste View Post
                            I noted,Mark mentioned the chess club absences by Wallace, as 2 months ,but games were scheduled for 2 per week, and Wallace had missed 4 that equals 2 weeks to my reckoning.??
                            According to Mark Russell’s book, Wallace last played at the Chess Club in a tournament that’s first round ended on November 30th, 1930 and he was eliminated in that first round.

                            JM

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by jmenges View Post

                              According to Mark Russell’s book, Wallace last played at the Chess Club in a tournament that’s first round ended on November 30th, 1930 and he was eliminated in that first round.

                              JM
                              In the competition that Wallace was in everyone played each other with the usual chess point system of 1 for a win 1/2 for a draw and 0 for a defeat. Wallace had only played one game which was against Lampitt on the 10th of November (which he lost) so it was just over 2 months since he’d played. That doesn’t necessarily mean that he hadn’t attended though as he could have turned up and not played a match (maybe potential opponents were playing against each other?)

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                              Regards

                              Herlock



                              Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

                              Comment


                              • I wonder if there was another competition played under the ‘knock-out’ format where you get quarter finals, semi-finals etc and Wallace had lost in the first round of that one? I’ve never heard of it Jon but it could have been something that Mark discovered during his research?
                                Regards

                                Herlock



                                Chairman of the National Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To The Old Established Theories.

                                Comment

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