Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ian Fleming alias James Bond.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ian Fleming alias James Bond.

    In 1948,Ian Fleming was involved in a plot to assassinate a leading Jamaican politition? The object was to prevent a communist takeover after the 1949 elections in Jamaica,after which the British would declare independence for that colony.
    Any views or knowledge of Fleming's involvement with the island at that time?

  • #2
    Harry you may know more about it than I do. Having read Matthew Parker's book Goldeneye of Fleming's life in Jamacia, I don't recall the part about a plot to assasinate anyone.

    So please do tell at your convenience,

    Roy
    Sink the Bismark

    Comment


    • #3
      Roy,
      A better book to read,in my opinion,is Peta Jensen's 'The last colonials'.
      While Parker's book may give a good insight into the character of Fleming,you can forget the Gin soaked parties and bed hopping that some portray was the social life of the white colonials of the late 1940's.Fleming himself had just the one affair with Blanche Blackwell,and even that may have been overstated.
      Now I was there 1948/49,and I became aquainted with both the extreme white colonials,and extreme poor black people,so my experiences,unlike Parker's,are first hand.I'll go so far as to say,that the novel,Dr No,was based around the character of Alexander Bustamante,and there would be no guessing as to who the three blind mice referred to.

      It would take a while to explain the complex matters involved,and why certain people were willing to go to extreme lengths.Can I prove my claims.Obviously not.Even if the participants are still alive,and some may be,I doubt there would be an admission of guilt.

      Now I have asked the question of Parker and several others,of what made Fleming make a short and at that time secret visit to Jamaica in September 1948.I have yet to receive an answer.

      Regards.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by harry View Post
        Now I was there 1948/49,and I became aquainted with both the extreme white colonials,and extreme poor black people,so my experiences,unlike Parker's,are first hand.I'll go so far as to say,that the novel,Dr No,was based around the character of Alexander Bustamante,and there would be no guessing as to who the three blind mice referred to.

        It would take a while to explain the complex matters involved,and why certain people were willing to go to extreme lengths.Can I prove my claims.Obviously not.Even if the participants are still alive,and some may be,I doubt there would be an admission of guilt.
        I confess my ignorance of the times, and I would absolutely love to hear as much as you're willing to tell.
        - Ginger

        Comment


        • #5
          Ginger,Roy,
          In understanding the situation in Jamaica 1948/49 it was against the backdrop of the cold war(began1947),a desire by the three per cent white colonials of Jamaica to sustain a colonial way of living and possession of land,and the aims of the ninety percent black peopple,led by Bustamante,to seize what they felt was an island that should belong to them.
          Whatever the history books may say,and what the British government will strongly deny,is that independence was to be granted after the 1949 elections in Jamaica.Our Battalion was to be the last British troops to be sent to the Island.The white colonials felt they were going to be abandoned and betrayed.

          If you read Parker's and others books,the one true thing is Fleming's passionate love of Jamaica,and his undoubted hatred of communism.He did at that time,intend at some future date to make it his permanent home,as did some other notable people.Of course he was not too well known in 1948,but had made some important friends in Jamaica.

          Was Bustamante a communist?.He denied that was so,but it was beleved he had strong links to Russia,and was determined to turn to them when the British left.What was their interest.In the main it was to gain a foothold in the Carribean,but most importantly,the use of the harbour.Now if you wonder at that,I suggest you study the 1924 naval talks between Britain and the USA.Who controlled Jamaica,controlled the Carribean and southern atlantic,through the use of naval forces.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by harry View Post
            Ginger,Roy,
            In understanding the situation in Jamaica 1948/49 it was against the backdrop of the cold war(began1947),a desire by the three per cent white colonials of Jamaica to sustain a colonial way of living and possession of land,and the aims of the ninety percent black peopple,led by Bustamante,to seize what they felt was an island that should belong to them.
            Whatever the history books may say,and what the British government will strongly deny,is that independence was to be granted after the 1949 elections in Jamaica.Our Battalion was to be the last British troops to be sent to the Island.The white colonials felt they were going to be abandoned and betrayed.

            If you read Parker's and others books,the one true thing is Fleming's passionate love of Jamaica,and his undoubted hatred of communism.He did at that time,intend at some future date to make it his permanent home,as did some other notable people.Of course he was not too well known in 1948,but had made some important friends in Jamaica.

            If I'm not mistaken at that time Noel Coward had a home in Jamaica, and so did the movie actor Errol Flynn.

            Jeff

            Comment


            • #7
              You are correct Jeff,and,from memory, their homes were all in the same general area.In 1947/48 Flynn Starred in a film partly filmed in Jamaica.Some shots were taken near the Dr Cave hotel,Montego Bay,witnessed by some members of my unit.I believe the female star was Ann Sherindan.Flynn's yacht was moored just out to sea,and from persons who claimed to have been on it,they spoke of wild parties aboard.

              If the old saying about Jamaica,of Rum,Bum and coconuts is true,then Coward would have been truly delighted.

              Comment

              Working...
              X