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Casebook Examiner Issues 1 - 7

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  • Casebook Examiner Issues 1 - 7

    All 7 Issues of the Casebook Examiner

    Right-click on the link to download.

    Casebook Examiner #1




    Casebook Examiner #2




    Casebook Examiner #3




    Casebook Examiner #4




    Casebook Examiner #5


  • #2
    Casebook Examiner #6




    Casebook Examiner #7

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    • #3
      Nice to see these surface again.

      Being a hard copy type of person, I printed them out as I got them way back in the day and ditched the links, so it's nice to get the digital versions again.

      Thanks!
      dustymiller
      aka drstrange

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      • #4
        I'm not familiar with all of these, and the article titles sound wonderful. Thank you for making them available!
        Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
        ---------------
        Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
        ---------------

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Jon

          Dave

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for these.

            I haven't read any Examiner, so i'll certainly enjoy picking my way through them.

            Cheers!http://forum.casebook.org/images/icons/icon7.gif

            Comment


            • #7
              Just read the article on the "Princess Alice" collision. I was aware of the disaster prior to learning about Elizabeth Stride's claim of being a sole survivor of it, but it's because it is one of the notorious "inland" waterway tragedies that frequently only remain known in their locales or to history specialists of some sort. Others of this nature (all American) are the "Sultana" steamboat explosion near Memphis, Tennessee on the Mississippi River (April 26, 1865) killing between 1,700 and 1,800 people (the ship was overcrowded by many Union soldiers returning from southern prisons, like Andersonville) making it a subject for American Civil War historians; the "General Slocum" disaster in New York City near "Hell's Gate" and North Brother Island on June 18, 1904 (it is referred to in James Joyce's novel "Ulysses" which takes place the next day in Dublin), which killed about 1,021 passengers on an excursion - mostly German immigrants from what was called the "Little Germany" section of Manhattan (now "Alphabet City"), and the worst loss of life incident in NYC prior to the events on 9/11/2001; and the "S.S. Eastland" in Chicago on the Chicago River to Lake Michigan, also on an excursion, which capsized and in June 1915, with the loss of 800 people on board. The "Slocum" actually (like the "Titanic" and "Bismarck") is shown on fire and sinking in a movie ("Manhattan Melodrama" (1934) with Clark Gable, William Powell, and Myrna Loy (their first film together) at the very beginning). The "Slocum" sequence is more like that of the "Tay Bridge Disaster" towards the end of "Hatter's Castle" (1947). The "Eastland" remains well known in Chicago, but not elsewhere - it's doom being covered by the sinking by submarine (a month earlier) of the "RMS Lusitania".

              Jeff

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              • #8
                Thanks, Jeff. Very interesting.

                One here local to my area is the Saluda. A riverboat traveling on the Missouri River just East of Kansas City whose boilers exploded in 1852 killing over 100 British Mormon immigrants.

                All the best,

                JM

                Comment


                • #9
                  Turns out I had a relative on "Alice".
                  G U T

                  There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GUT View Post
                    Turns out I had a relative on "Alice".
                    Interesting. Was the relative a survivor or not?

                    I have an interesting connection of sorts to the "Slocum". My grandmother Anna (when a school girl) had a friend who was looking forward to the excursion. But the friend got sick, so she and her family stayed home. Grandma visited her and tried to cheer her up. As they were talking, they heard screams outside from the street from people who saw the "Slocum" burning up. Because her friend missed the trip, she and her family were not among the dead.

                    Jeff
                    Last edited by Mayerling; 02-21-2017, 05:02 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
                      Interesting. Was the relative a survivor or not?

                      I have an interesting connection of sorts to the "Slocum". My grandmother Anna (when a school girl) had a friend who was looking forward to the excursion. But the friend got sick, so she and her family stayed home. Grandma visited her and tried to cheer her up. As they were talking, they heard screams outside from the street from people who saw the "Slocum" burning up. Because her friend missed the trip, she and her family were not among the dead.

                      Jeff
                      From memory, missing, never found, but I will need to check.

                      So many stories like your grandmother's I had a similar one myself (that I'd rather not post about here) that is the only reason I'm alive today.
                      G U T

                      There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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