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Oh, Dear Boss- So you want to be a rock and roll star?

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  • Oh, Dear Boss- So you want to be a rock and roll star?

    Oh, Dear Boss- So you want to be a rock and roll star?
    June 16th, 2019
    Duration: 01:03:36

    With the publication of 'Jack and the Thames Torso Murders: A New Ripper?' by Drew Gray and Andrew Wise as a backdrop, author Tom Wescott talks about the pleasures and the perils of writing Jack the Ripper books in the current age of internet message boards critiques, and offers advice to aspiring Ripperology authors.


    http://www.casebook.org/podcast/listen.html?id=226

    Also in Apple & Google podcasts, Stitcher, Podcast Addict, Tunein Radio, etc. etc. etc.

    Thanks to Tom Wescott for taking the time to chat yesterday.

    And thank you for listening,



    JM

  • #2
    Euan Macpherson's The Trial of Jack the Ripper - The Case of William Bury (1859-89) and James Tully's Prisoner 1167 -The Madman who was Jack the Ripper, about James Kelly were two excellent Ripper suspect books which did not follow the formula Tom describes but instead have unique forms.

    But then I've not read many or any of the new suspect books such as the Shawl or Michael Maybrick (I still say that book should come with an accompanying CD of spooky organ music) so I really can't judge them. Am no longer a completist, if I ever was.

    Anyway, that's my 2 cents. And in my opinion, the reason Cornwell's book is so enjoyable Tom, even though we don't believe hardly any of it, is (1) yes as you say she actually writes for a living, and (2) she sticks to the main character at all times. Never straying to pay lip service to other suspects, or practically anything else, a winning formula in itself. Again, she knows that because she writes for a living.

    That could be one big reason staring us in the face. Who writes for a living? Paul Begg. His 200 page The Facts in 1988 was outstanding, and launched his sterling Ripper writing career.

    That's as far as I got in the show. I lot was in the first 15 minutes, thank you. And since I've not read the new Torso thing and probably won't I suppose it's Que Sera Sera for now, pardners.

    Roy
    Sink the Bismark

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    • #3
      Roy says "Euan Macpherson's The Trial of Jack the Ripper - The Case of William Bury (1859-89) and James Tully's Prisoner 1167 -The Madman who was Jack the Ripper, about James Kelly were two excellent Ripper suspect books which did not follow the formula Tom describes but instead have unique forms.'

      Roy, you're correct. In fact, in a portion edited from the final episode, I talk about the Tully book.

      Yours truly,

      Tom Wescott

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