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The singularly strange Death of Rose Mylett

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  • Varqm
    replied
    It is interesting why Robert Anderson contradicted the doctors,what was to gain? If he just accepted the doctors and investigated what was the big deal? This was a weird reaction by Anderson.
    Last edited by Varqm; 02-15-2021, 08:55 PM.

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  • Ginger
    replied
    My boyfriend used diethyl ether once to render me unconscious (it was consensual). As I recall, there wasn't any lingering smell. I'm not sure how effective it would be for immobilizing a victim, though - it took a few good deep breaths before I was semi-conscious, and then several more before I finally passed out. If I'd actually been fighting or try to escape, I'm not sure how well it would have worked.

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  • sdreid
    replied
    Rose Mylett was found dead 125 year ago this Friday, the 20th, closing out the Autumn of Terror. Despite some disagreement, the official ruling was murder, possibly by JtR.
    Last edited by sdreid; 12-17-2013, 04:11 PM.

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  • Errata
    replied
    Originally posted by lynn cates View Post
    Hello Viper. That could happen. Thanks.

    Do you happen to know how long the ether traces would remain? Since it wasn't mentioned I'm not sure it was present.

    Whole self strangulation story sounds odd.

    Cheers.
    LC
    I let my sister chloroform me once as research for her novel. People could smell it for hours afterwards, like, 10 hours afterwards.

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  • Wickerman
    replied
    Some opinions on death by strangulation which may pertain to the Mylett case.

    Quote:
    EDWARD COLLETT SHOPPEE . I am a M.R.C.S., and a registered medical practitioner, living at 233, Kentish Town Road.....
    "....The distortion of the features depends a good deal on the amount of time during which the constriction is kept up; if quickly removed, in cases of hanging, even in judicial executions, there would be very little distortion—I have said that in this case it would not take more than a minute and a half to effect strangulation; if after that time the ligature was removed I should expect to find very little distortion—the degree of distortion would depend partly on the violence used and partly on the time during which the process lasted—it would require extraordinary resolution for a person to keep up the pressure for a minute and a half on their own person, they would become insensible; if they became insensible and the hands relaxed, the cords would at once become loose, therefore it would be morally impossible that any person could strangle themselves and produce the mark on themselves otherwise than by hanging."
    http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/brows...ture#highlight

    This whole record makes interesting reading, if for nothing else but the medical opinions.

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  • Wickerman
    replied
    Originally posted by lynn cates View Post
    Hello All. I found this snippet in "Lloyd's Weekly" for December 23, 1888. Nurse Creed's manner of death looks vaguely similar to Mylett's.
    How does one commit suicide like this? Seems impossible on the face of it.
    Cheers.
    LC
    But in Creed's case the tape was still in place around her neck. Not really a parallel to Mylett's case.

    Although the issue of the mark around her neck seems formost, we should not forget Dr. Brownfield also observed;
    "The left side of the heart was full of fluid black blood........and the lungs were gorged with the same fluid black blood, meaning that for the space of several respirations she had not breathed before the heart ceased to pulsate".

    According to Dr Phillips, this was also the case with the Chapman murder.

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  • lynn cates
    replied
    access

    Hello Viper. That's right. A nurse might have had access to such chemicals.

    Cheers.
    LC

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  • sleekviper
    replied
    No idea, back then it may have been assumed to have been a method since she was a nurse. That whole suicide idea has always seemed odd to me since I would imagine that with my luck it would not work, and then would be worse than before the attempt.

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  • lynn cates
    replied
    ethereal

    Hello Viper. That could happen. Thanks.

    Do you happen to know how long the ether traces would remain? Since it wasn't mentioned I'm not sure it was present.

    Whole self strangulation story sounds odd.

    Cheers.
    LC

    Leave a comment:


  • sleekviper
    replied
    Hello Lynn.
    If she poured some ether in the bag before wrapping it tight, she would pass out before the self preservation instinct had her ripping at the bag, but allow her to complete the act.

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  • lynn cates
    replied
    Nurse Creed

    Hello All. I found this snippet in "Lloyd's Weekly" for December 23, 1888. Nurse Creed's manner of death looks vaguely similar to Mylett's.

    How does one commit suicide like this? Seems impossible on the face of it.

    Cheers.
    LC
    Attached Files

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  • nugnug
    replied
    what i find strange is that no alchol was found in her system.

    so was she with 2 teatotal sailors.

    that does not really add up.

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  • Jon Guy
    replied
    Hello Natalie

    You were quite correct,of course, Alice Graves saw Rose with two men in Whitechapel, an hour or so before she was found dead in Poplar, about two miles away.

    I did note that Rose had money on her when she was found, which may rule out robbery as a motive, but there doesn`t appear to be the evidence of scavenging through possessions, as seen with Chapman and Eddowes.

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  • Natalie Severn
    replied
    Originally posted by Cap'n Jack View Post
    'I think the murderer must have stood behind the woman on the left side, and having the ends of the string round his hands, thrown the cord round her throat, and crossing his hands, so strangled her. Where the hands crossed would be just where the the marks of the cord are absent. The cords being tight would prevent the woman from calling out for help. I think it quite possible that the cord would be run through two holes or rings, and then twisted by a turn of the wrist till death ensued.'
    Mr. Brownfield, Divisional Surgeon.
    Thanks for that Cap"n Jack.I looked for such a statement as that but was unable to find it.It may be there but difficult to find.
    Best
    Natalie

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  • Cap'n Jack
    replied
    'I think the murderer must have stood behind the woman on the left side, and having the ends of the string round his hands, thrown the cord round her throat, and crossing his hands, so strangled her. Where the hands crossed would be just where the the marks of the cord are absent. The cords being tight would prevent the woman from calling out for help. I think it quite possible that the cord would be run through two holes or rings, and then twisted by a turn of the wrist till death ensued.'
    Mr. Brownfield, Divisional Surgeon.

    Leave a comment:

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