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Rose Mylett Biographical details

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  • #16
    Myletts

    Thanks for the info Debs.

    Firstly I couldnt find an early death for Henry (did you find one?)

    1940 US census: There is a Henry Mylett aged 57 (b1884) married to a Margaret aged 56 with a son Richard aged 22 in 1940 USA census in San Francisco. Wife came from Montana and son from California. Henry from England.

    1911 UK census: Theres a Henry Davies in aged 27 living in a mens lodging house at 4/5 North East Passage, St George in the East, He is a tailor. born London

    I seem to lean towards the Irish Henry and Margaret Mylett of 46 Thomas street being Roses parents. Perhaps its just the name Henry?

    Best wishes
    Pat Marshall
    Last edited by Paddy; 02-26-2013, 07:37 PM. Reason: Wrong year

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    • #17
      California Henry

      I have just seen the Californian Henry Mylett in 1930 us census for Napa California
      Hes a Bookeeper and his father is said to be Irish and his mother English.

      Was Thomas Davies Irish does anyone know?
      Best wishes
      Pat Marshall

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Paddy View Post
        Thanks for the info Debs.

        Firstly I couldnt find an early death for Henry (did you find one?)

        1940 US census: There is a Henry Mylett aged 57 (b1884) married to a Margaret aged 56 with a son Richard aged 22 in 1940 USA census in San Francisco. Wife came from Montana and son from California. Henry from England.

        1911 UK census: Theres a Henry Davies in aged 27 living in a mens lodging house at 4/5 North East Passage, St George in the East, He is a tailor. born London

        I seem to lean towards the Irish Henry and Margaret Mylett of 46 Thomas street being Roses parents. Perhaps its just the name Henry?

        Best wishes
        Pat Marshall
        Hi Pat,
        If I recall properly-Rob ordered the death certificate for a young Henry Mylett of about the right age. He turned out to be the child of a different family.
        Newspaper reports mentioned Rose's child 'Flossie' and that she had recently buried two other children.
        Those are interesting US entries. Thanks. I don't have access to the world section of Ancestry any more so can't look at them. I wonder if there are any other Henry Mylett's born around the same time in the UK?

        Just to avoid any confusion-Rose was the daughter of Margaret and Henry Mylett or Millett who lived at Thomas Street but her real name was Catherine. She was born 8th December 1859 to Margaret Mylett (nee Haley) and Henry Mylett of No. 13, Thomas Street, Whitechapel, labourer in a starch works. (this info is from Bill Beadle's dissertation which I linked to in post#1 of the thread.) Chris Scott also posted the census information down to 1871. I found Catherine listed as Kate Davis in the 1881 census, living with her daughter and that was what led me and Rob to Florence's birth entry in 1881-the certificate confirming it was Catherine Mylett's daughter.

        Due to the settlement record you found, we now know Catherine definitely wasn't married when she had her children I'm tempted to take the name of the father of the children as Thomas Davis with a pinch of salt. We were never able to locate an upholsterer by that name in the census anywhere and Margaret Mylett gave evidence that she had never seen or met Catherine's 'husband.' Florence Mylett went to live with her grandmother, Margaret in Thomas Street in 1883 and stayed for about 4 years. Florence was afterwards in and out of the workhouse and Sutton school going by Infirmary entries for Catherine. Margaret was seemingly unaware of the grandson named Henry either.
        Last edited by Debra A; 02-26-2013, 08:45 PM.
        ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸, Debs ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸,

        I am not DJA. He's called Dave.

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        • #19
          California Henry Mylett

          Nope wrong chap The Henry Mylett in California's death record shows his parents have different names to Catherin / Rose Mylett and Thomas Davies.
          Your 1901 and 1911 for Florence looks right. I can find nothing else. I wonder if her name was changed because of the association with her mothers death?
          If it was her, she seemed to have done well in life...
          Best wishes
          Pat Marshall

          Comment


          • #20
            Thomas Davis

            London Marriages and Banns, Bethnal Green

            Probably nothing but a coincidence, but a Thomas Davis married an Ann Dillon in Bethnal Green on Jul 12th 1875. He was a box maker and the son of a Charles Davis a silk sorter. Thomas's address was given as 12 Thomas Street.

            Pat.........

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            • #21
              Hi Pat.
              Thanks for the info.
              I suspect that there may be a Thomas Street in both Behnal Green and Whitechapel?

              One Thomas Davis of interest that came up during mine and Rob's research 4 years ago was one mentioned in the illegal boxing reports of 1882, involving John McCarthy of Dorset Street.
              We discovered that shortly before her death Mylett had been living with a man named Ben Goodson. And as confirmed by David Knott who later did some research on him-Only one Benjamin Goodson fitted the bill-a carman born and living in Spitalfields and brother to Henry 'Sugar' Goodson, the boxer involved in the illegal fight. One of the men arrested along with McCarthy was a man named Thomas Davis. He was described as a gas stoker though at the time of his arrest and from Luke St. Mile End. Mylett was living in Mile End in 1881.

              Times
              29 March 1882


              AN ALLEGED PRIZE FIGHT.
              __________

              Yesterday, at the Bow-street Police-court, before Mr. Vaughan, a man named Henry Goodson, a carman, living in Brick-lane, Spitalfields, was charged with committing a breach of the peace, and being one of the principals in a prize fight at St. Andrew’s-hall, Tavistock-place. Aaron Moss, aged 48, of Corbet’s-court, Andrew-street, Spitalfields, fishmonger; William Scoll, aged 22, 17, Lisbon-street, Cambridge-heath-road, fishmonger; John Satchell, Brick-lane, Spitalfields, beerhouse keeper; John M’Carthy, 27, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, shopkeeper; Thomas Moss, 2, New-street, Union-street, Lambeth, bricklayer; Joseph Lilly, 76, Moneyer-street, Hoxton, general dealer; Thomas Davis, Luke-street, Mile-end, gas stoker; George Lewis, Vanston-place, coalham-green, carpenter; and R. Smith, Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields, general dealer, were charged with aiding and abetting and taking part in the fight. Smith was further charged with assaulting the police; and George Stevens, of John’s-place, Whitechapel, a blacksmith, was also charged with assaulting a police-constable.
              Mr. Superintendent Thomson, on behalf of the police, stated that it was only proposed at present to offer sufficient evidence to justify a remand.
              The first witness called was the constable who charged Stevens with assaulting him by striking him on the mouth while he was endeavouring to disperse the crowd assembled outside the hall. The defendant declared his innocence, and was remanded, to give him an opportunity of calling witnesses on his behalf.
              Inspector Arscott, of the Hunter-street Police-station, then deposed that at about 3 o’clock on Monday afternoon he received an intimation that a prize fight was about to take place at the hall, which was formerly used by Archdeacon Dunbar as a church. Witness secured the assistance of two plain-clothes officers—Sergeant Rowan and Detective Scandrell, and proceeded to the place in question. He encountered at the door a man who gave the name of John George Elliott, of 14, Finsbury-square, and stated that he had “hired the hall for a few amateur gentlemen to have a sparring match.” This man was admitting persons through a turnstile. Witness and his companion, passing through, saw a large number of persons assembled in the hall. Two men entered a ring formed in the centre of the hall by means of ropes and stakes. A carpet was lying on the ground. The two men who entered the ring first were not arrested with the others. They sparred in the ring for some little time, and then gave place to two other men. The latter, who were also stripped, sparred with boxing-gloves on. After they had finished, the prisoner Goodson and another man (not in custody) entered the ring. They fought with gloves of a lighter kind than those used by the other men. Goodson knocked down his antagonist, who was unable to get up again for a second or more. He, however, rose and fought again. He was again knocked down, Goodson still striking him as he feel across the rope.
              Mr. VAUGHAN.—What, while he was down?
              Witness said that the man was struck while across the rope and also kicked by Goodson. The bystanders struck both men with sticks. Witness entered the ring and said, “This must not be allowed; stop the fight.” Immediately there was a general rush for the door. The defendants, however, were secured, and all, with the exception of Lewis, were identified as having been present when the fight was proceeding. They encouraged Goodson with cries of “Go it, ‘Sugar!’”—a name by which he was known. Moss was acting as his second, and in the ring there was a small basket containing ice, some spirits in a bottle, jars containing water, zinc pails, and several sponges. There were some slight traces of blood on Goodson’s face.
              In cross-examination by Mr. Armstrong, on behalf of Goodson, witness said he saw one pair of gloves on the hands of the parties, but the gloves produced were not those worn by Goodson. He had a thin pair, which were not padded. Witness heard nothing about the Queensberry rules. Goodson kicked the other man in a most brutal way.
              In cross-examination by Mr. Clark, on behalf of M’Carthy and Satchell, it was stated htat there were about 200 persons in the room, and witness expressed his belief that all the persons present were mixed up in the affair. He thought that the first couples had sparred fairly, but that Goodson and his opponent did not use fair gloves.
              Detective-sergeant Rowan deposed to having accompanied the last witness to the scene of the fight. He saw M’Carthy and Lewis standing first outside the turnstile. He asked what was going on. He was told that it was a sparring match, and that the admission was one guinea. M’Carthy asked whether he had a guinea, and upon receiving a reply in the negative, he made us of an oath and told him to get outside. After some difficulty, he was admitted by Elliott. The ring was formed in the body of the hall, towards the chancel. Many persons were in the body of the hall, and in the place where the Communion table once stood were a number of raised seats. Witness walked to a room adjoining the chancel, where he found Goodson, Moss, Scott, and other men. On a table were sponges, towels, ice, bottles of spirits, and some india-rubber shoes. After examining these articles, witness returned to the chancel. By that time Goodson and his opponent had entered the ring. Each had two seconds. Bets were made by the spectators on the raised seats, the sums ranging from £2 to £20. The defendants could hear the bets made. Witness then described the way in which the other man was knocked down and treated by Goodson. He further stated that both men kicked each other. They put down their hands when the officers entered the ring and called upon them to stop. M’Carthy said, “Never mind the police, fight it out.” The mob made a rush to the door, and all of them, with the exception of the prisoners, succeeded in getting out. Witness described the gloves worn by Goodson as being thinner than ordinary boxing gloves. He added that a person who acted as referee read some rules before the fight commenced and held up a cup, which he said was to be fought for in addition to so much per side. Witness did not hear what the amount was. One of the rules was that when either of the combatants was down the seconds should not assist him, under pain of disqualification, and he was allowed ten seconds to rise.
              In cross-examination, witness said he remembered only the above rule. He did not hear one providing that if a man were knocked on the ropes in a helpless state with his feet off the ground he should be deemed down. The gloves worn by Goodson and his opponent were taken away in the rush. The cup to be fought for was left at a publichouse in the Euston-road, and handed to the police.
              Mr. VAUGHAN here granted a remand, agreeing to accept two sureties in £40 each for the appearance of the defendants, notice of bail to be given to the police.
              Mr. Thomas, on behalf of Lewis, submitted that this client was quite innocent of taking any part in the proceedings, as he had merely brought up the turnstile from Walham-green for his employer, Mr. Starke, who had received the order for it from Elliott by telegram now produced.
              Mr. VAUGHAN declined to discharge Lewis at present.


              Transcript courtesy of Dave O'Flaherty from an archived thread.
              ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸, Debs ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸¸,

              I am not DJA. He's called Dave.

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              • #22
                Luke Street

                Thanks for this, It really brings these people to life when one reads these articles Debs...

                I was checking out Luke street, Mile End

                I could only find it on a pub site for no 1 Luke street. Mile End New Town
                The Landlords name was John Vint he was born in 1832 Bethnal Green
                You can locate him there in 1881 census. RG11 440

                As I looked through the houses in Luke street straight away there were a John Davis and Family and a Henry Davis and family in different houses in Luke street. I have not checked all the street.
                I wonder if they could have been related?

                Just a thought
                Best wishes Pat

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                • #23
                  Thomas Davis "Stoker"

                  Thomas Davis, a Stoker, (widower) married Fanny Sarah Russell (widow) on April 22nd 1884 in Bethnal Green, st James the Great.

                  Found this on the London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921
                  He said his father was Thomas Davis Deceased

                  Pat (again)

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