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  • Elenahoyos66
    replied
    Originally posted by Debra A View Post


    What a classy lookin' dame! haha

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  • Robert
    replied
    She probably got to wear better clothes in there than on the outside.

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  • Debra A
    replied
    Photograph of Tottie Fay taken in Broadmoor asylum, 1894.



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  • Chava
    replied
    'Tat' for sure! 'Tut' I'm certain at least got its start among the Jews of the East End, and 'tut' is what my friends' parents used to call the clobber we bought from Biba in the 60s. It's just a variant of the word, and it's pejorative for sure. However I doubt that 'Tottie' comes from 'tatty'!

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  • anna
    replied
    Hi Chava,

    Perhaps because I am not jewish I haven't heard of the word "tut"...so I would take it that "toot"was what I was hearing,but there is definitely the word"toot"..a cockney word for a cheap bit of "tat" which is what I thought Sir Allen says when he refers to items bought by teams in their challenges as being of a cheap or tasteless quality.(tat is also used for "tatters"..a quote from a famous music hall song used at the beginning of Michael Palins brilliant film "The Missionary"..if you haven't seen that film,it's a must for those interested in "victorian" themes...very funny...google it in everyone,and have a laugh...anyway Chava..I presume tatters was also slang for clothes in the VP)there is also the word "tatty"....elongated from the word tat above..clothes or other items well worn and past their best days.
    Being a cockney myself I still use the words toot,tat and tatty nowadays..although not in reference to the goods on my market stall which are of high quality and extremely good taste !!!!!!!!!!!!
    Anna.
    Last edited by anna; 03-27-2010, 11:58 AM.

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  • Chava
    replied
    Point of information: the word referred to by Anna above is in fact 'tut' and you'll hear Sir Alan Sugar say it all the time on The Apprentice. However it's Jewish slang, not Cockney slang, and I've never ever heard it outside London Jewish circles. Nor have I ever heard 'tuttie'.

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  • DVV
    replied
    I don't think so, Jukka.

    In any case, this "1887 victim" didn't exist at all until September 1888 (when she's first mentioned in some newspapers).

    Amitiés,
    David

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  • j.r-ahde
    replied
    Hello you all!

    Just came to my mind about this "Victim With No Name", to whom the Fairy Fay character is based on;

    Were there any contemporary illustrations of this 1887 "victim"?

    All the best
    Jukka

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  • Wolf Vanderlinden
    replied
    Gideon Fell

    'Tottie Fay' was first connected with 'Fairy Fay' by the authors of the A to Z in 1994, page 138.
    You are absolutely correct. Well spotted.

    Wolf.

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  • Suzi
    replied
    A MOST alarming Swell I say!!! Matron!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Or maybe Its that Fid Len E. Bhat fellow........ he of the little known graffito fame!

    I put it all down to the check trousers....shades of CoCo aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!
    Last edited by Suzi; 04-07-2008, 09:57 PM.

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    ...well, I can make out Druitt, Tumblety and JK Stephen - but who's the other guy?

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  • Suzi
    replied
    Quite Caz -as to tottie/totty but I've always used the word TOOT (rhymes with boot) to mean c**p or rubbish!- That may be a Suzi-ism but I suspect it aint...Hey Caz to save you looking at the GH thread thought this may make you
    Click image for larger version

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    ...Did me......

    Suz xxxxx

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  • caz
    replied
    Hi All,

    And of course, Tottie was/is also a slang term for a sexy piece or "nice bit of skirt".

    One of my first encounters with the remarkable Tot Fay was back in 1999 when I found her trying her funny little games on Weedon Grossmith (of Diary of a Nobody fame) in his autobiography. I suspect her antics made more than one male victim very cynical about the 'fairer' sex. She didn't know how to play fair.

    Love,

    Caz
    X

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by anna View Post
    I presume the first name Tottie comes from the East End slang for less than perfect goods,"toot".(rhyming with foot).Or maybe it's a shortening of a name.
    The latter, I think, Anna. "Tottie", like "Lottie", was a shortened form of "Charlotte". The name of "Tottie Fay" appears as an asylum inmate in the 1891 Census; her occupation being given as "actress". Born 1866/7 in Bloomsbury, she is possibly the same Charlotte Fay, daughter of coach-driver George and wife Charlotte, who appears in the 1871 and 1881 censuses, living with her parents in the (West End) district of St George's Hanover Square.

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  • anna
    replied
    What a character! Thanks for the read of her exploits Jake L. I presume the first name Tottie comes from the East End slang for less than perfect goods,"toot".(rhyming with foot).Or maybe it's a shortening of a name.Makes Eddowes impersonating a fire engine seem like an everyday occurance.Would have loved to have met her.

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