Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

recovery locations

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Here is one more reference that pretty much seals the location, in my mind anyways.

    Bankside/British History

    No. 79 (Falcon Drawing Dock)

    The Falcon Drawing Dock and the premises on the east side, No. 79 Bankside, are on the site of part of the Falcon Inn. They were leased to Messrs. Newton & Sons, firebrick merchants, the present owners, in 18334 by Messrs. Handasyde & Prickett, who had a lease from the Bishop of Winchester. No. 79, the office, was rebuilt in 1840 though it retains two patches of early 18th-century walling. The door and windows facing the dock on what now forms the main front, and those at the north end, are treated with classical mouldings. They date from the rebuilding.

    Comment


    • #17
      Great work JD, that seems pretty conclusive!
      Not that it gets us any nearer to knowing when or where the pieces were dumped into the river, but at least we now know where they were all found.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
        Great work JD, that seems pretty conclusive!
        Not that it gets us any nearer to knowing when or where the pieces were dumped into the river, but at least we now know where they were all found.
        Thanks JR,

        Leave no stone unturned, as the saying goes, and maybe it will eventually help down the road. Who knows?

        Also, out of interest, the Falcon Inn/Tavern was "celebrated for having been the daily resort of Shakespeare and his dramatic companions." The Globe Theatre was close by.

        Comment

        Working...
        X