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Russell Edwards Unveils 'Catherine Eddowes Plaque' at Wolverhampton

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  • Russell Edwards Unveils 'Catherine Eddowes Plaque' at Wolverhampton

    Yesterday Russell Edwards unveiled a blue plaque to Catherine Eddowes at Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society.

    The plaque features an image of Catherine Eddowes and is inscribed, “Catherine Eddowes. Born nearby, at 20 Merridale Street, Graiseley Green on 14-4-1842 and murdered on 30-9-1888 in Whitechapel, London. An innocent victim of ‘Jack The Ripper’.”

    There's also a Victorian photograph of a woman.

    http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2...im-remembered/

    Best regards,
    Archaic

  • #2
    Originally posted by Archaic View Post
    Yesterday Russell Edwards unveiled a blue plaque to Catherine Eddowes at Wolverhampton Civic & Historical Society.

    The plaque features an image of Catherine Eddowes and is inscribed, “Catherine Eddowes. Born nearby, at 20 Merridale Street, Graiseley Green on 14-4-1842 and murdered on 30-9-1888 in Whitechapel, London. An innocent victim of ‘Jack The Ripper’.”

    There's also a Victorian photograph of a woman.

    http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2...im-remembered/

    Best regards,
    Archaic
    Gotta say he likes the attention.
    G U T

    There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

    Comment


    • #3
      Still say he should be called out about claiming 'One Million Copies Sold' of his book.
      ---------------------------------------------------
      JtR3D.com JtR 3D Blog
      ---------------------------------------------------
      HHAP

      Comment


      • #4
        I thought she was born in London?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
          I thought she was born in London?
          No, her father was a Wolverhampton Tinplate worker at the time Kate was born, but they soon moved down to London.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
            I thought she was born in London?
            Not according to her bio summary here on Casebook, definitely Wolverhampton.

            The British put up plaques everywhere, don't they? Interesting.
            Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
            ---------------
            Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
            ---------------

            Comment


            • #7
              Oh yeah. I may have got the move-at-a-young-age the wrong way round. Sorry, I'm easily confused.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
                Not according to her bio summary here on Casebook, definitely Wolverhampton.

                The British put up plaques everywhere, don't they? Interesting.
                Hi,

                Do you think that the British put up plaques more frequently than others? If so, why?

                Regards, Pierre

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pierre View Post
                  Hi,

                  Do you think that the British put up plaques more frequently than others? If so, why?

                  Regards, Pierre
                  Pierre

                  cannot say if more than others, however we Brits do have a regard and a respect for the past.

                  s

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pierre View Post
                    Hi,

                    Do you think that the British put up plaques more frequently than others? If so, why?

                    Regards, Pierre
                    Hi Pierre,

                    The Americans do put up plaques, though not as many as the British do. I might add we don't have quite the reverence here for these plaques, most of which are made of metal. Frequently they are stolen by people seeking metal that they can sell (to be melted down and reused). There was such a plaque on a townhouse on lower Lexington Avenue in Manhattan a number of years ago, that was stolen within weeks of it being installed on the side of the townhouse. The townhouse was the home of the 21st President of the U.S., Chester Alan Arthur. It's never been replaced.

                    Jeff

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pierre View Post
                      Hi,

                      Do you think that the British put up plaques more frequently than others? If so, why?

                      Regards, Pierre
                      Hello, Pierre.

                      My mother visited England and Europe in the early 1970s, and the thing which struck her about London was the number of plaques as the Tower of London commemorating the particular spot where a king, queen, or noble had been executed. She said, "they have a very bloody history, and they're so proud of it!"

                      I was able to visit England, Ireland, and part of Europe about ten years later, and we did visit the Tower of London. Many plaques, some ravens, and lots of tourists.
                      Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                      ---------------
                      Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                      ---------------

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
                        Hi Pierre,

                        The Americans do put up plaques, though not as many as the British do. I might add we don't have quite the reverence here for these plaques, most of which are made of metal. Frequently they are stolen by people seeking metal that they can sell (to be melted down and reused). There was such a plaque on a townhouse on lower Lexington Avenue in Manhattan a number of years ago, that was stolen within weeks of it being installed on the side of the townhouse. The townhouse was the home of the 21st President of the U.S., Chester Alan Arthur. It's never been replaced.

                        Jeff


                        Hi all

                        Both Baltimore and the Tower of London share the raven as a symbol. The people of the United States certainly cherish their history and, if something of historical note took place in any location, they are apt to put up a marker. We have a ton of them in Maryland. However, the plain fact is that the Brits have been going a hell of a lot longer than the Americans, so they have a whole lot more to commemorate.

                        Cheers

                        Chris
                        Christopher T. George
                        Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conference
                        just held in Baltimore, April 7-8, 2018.
                        For information about RipperCon, go to http://rippercon.com/
                        RipperCon 2018 talks can now be heard at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Even us poor Aussies have a few and were the baby of nations.
                          G U T

                          There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Raven is also revered among some Native American tribes in the Pacific Northwest. He is the "trickster" character in their folklore, much as the Coyote is among the Plains and Southwestern tribes.

                            I think history needs markers, but sometimes need changes made if the events they tell us about are inaccurate or phrased in outdated language (such as "The Battle of Sand Creek" being more properly a Massacre.)
                            The Library of Congress periodically updates subject headings that are now deemed offensive to the groups they describe-- a controversy now is their decision to drop "Illegal Aliens" for "Noncitizens", which some politicians are crictizing.
                            Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
                            ---------------
                            Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
                            ---------------

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
                              The Raven is also revered among some Native American tribes in the Pacific Northwest. He is the "trickster" character in their folklore, much as the Coyote is among the Plains and Southwestern tribes.

                              I think history needs markers, but sometimes need changes made if the events they tell us about are inaccurate or phrased in outdated language (such as "The Battle of Sand Creek" being more properly a Massacre.)
                              The Library of Congress periodically updates subject headings that are now deemed offensive to the groups they describe-- a controversy now is their decision to drop "Illegal Aliens" for "Noncitizens", which some politicians are crictizing.
                              I have no trouble with a choice to adopt a new title, but am troubled by attempts to retrospectively change history, but that may be just me.
                              G U T

                              There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

                              Comment

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