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  • Yup, and as far as we know, he wrote in glowing terms of George Hutchinson, and this glowing endorsement is what made it into the introduction of The Trial of George Chapman by Hargrave Lee Adam (1930) which tips its hat to the trustworthy George.


    I seem to have ruffled Abby's feathers, but I'm just trying to help the poor kid out, as she stumbles down the road to reason. There is nothing in the record to suggest Hutch was discredited...just speculation piled on speculation.


    If I had to hire a detective, I would hire a gullible one. The worst he could do is waste time following a false lead; the skeptical detective, on the other hand, will throw away the most vital clue that solves the case, thinking it is just more horsesh*ite. RP
    Last edited by rjpalmer; 09-25-2018, 09:46 PM.

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    • But George Hutchinson didn't exist, anymore than Mr. Astrakhan.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
        But George Hutchinson didn't exist, anymore than Mr. Astrakhan.
        Hutchinson existed all right.
        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

        "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
          Abberline was about to write to Macnaghten, "to say how strongly I was impressed with the opinion that ‘Chapman’ was also the author of the Whitechapel murders."
          It's a damn good guess because two serial killers operating in a 3km^2 area at the same time, even in Whitechapel's population density, is unheard of.

          The population density of Whitechapel in 1888 was approx. 250,000.

          This is at the very least 150,000 people shy of the bare minimum we have for two serial killers operating in the same place

          To hit the sort of density where you could have two or more serial killers operating in the same area is like 400,000+ ... and the areas are NOT 3km^2 but 420km^2 ! ... or even 1000s of km^2!

          All of London, Ontario (which has the figures above). All of Los Angeles. Long island (2,168.85 /km^2 and 7.5 million people).

          Then we have Whitechapel with a smidgen of an area and two serial killers operating at the same time.

          The biggest obstacle to Seweryn Antonowicz Kłosowski being Jack the Ripper is a change in MO.

          Well MO changes are a fact of modern criminology and a change in MO is simply no reason to claim obstacles anymore.

          Hutchenson also describing someone who looks like George Chapman before we knew of George Chapman isn't a bad fact to consider either.

          Modern forensic sketches
          http://www.forartist.com/forensic/co.../jtrsketch.jpg
          https://s.hswstatic.com/gif/jack-the-ripper-4.jpg

          George Chapman
          https://s3.amazonaws.com/headstuffup...orge_trial.jpg
          https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...apman_illo.jpg
          http://murderpedia.org/male.C/images...chapman000.jpg
          Last edited by Batman; 09-26-2018, 03:54 AM.
          Bona fide canonical and then some.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Batman View Post
            The biggest obstacle to Seweryn Antonowicz Kłosowski being Jack the Ripper is a change in MO.
            I don't think it's that much of stumbling block when you factor in the victimology. Chapman bumped off his mistresses insidiously to avoid suspicion, not the same as targetting a bunch of random streetwalkers.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Batman View Post
              It's a damn good guess because two serial killers operating in a 3km^2 area at the same time, even in Whitechapel's population density, is unheard of.

              The population density of Whitechapel in 1888 was approx. 250,000.

              This is at the very least 150,000 people shy of the bare minimum we have for two serial killers operating in the same place
              The "same places" we're used to in more recent times comprise a mixture of poor and better-off neighbourhoods, with the overwhelming majority being decent, well-adjusted people. This was not the case in the Victorian slums of the East End, which had a disproportionate number of poor areas compared to the (comparatively) better-off, and a higher proportion of violent and badly-adjusted residents than we see in most modern Western conurbations of equivalent, or even greater, size.

              If you ask me, a population of 250,000 in the "vicious, semi-criminal" milieu of Late Victorian Whitechapel strikes me as a fertile breeding-ground for killers of all types, whether serial or otherwise.
              Kind regards, Sam Flynn

              "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
                I don't think it's that much of stumbling block when you factor in the victimology. Chapman bumped off his mistresses insidiously...
                Agreed, and each one poisoned gradually over a long period of time.
                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
                  this was a private room with a door that could be locked.
                  It was by far the safest spot to commit a murder-which is evidenced by the damage done to Mary.

                  unless someone was going to beat down her door, or climb through the window, entering her room illegally-the killer really had no fear of getting caught. he could even clean up a bit and leave when he wanted to.
                  The entrance to the courtyard is a long stone archway, anyone entering the courtyard or leaving it could be easily spotted. Once in the room, with his back turned towards the window if you factor in the physicality of the situation, he is essentially very trap-able.

                  I agree with Sam that vaulting over fences would wake everyone with windows open facing that yard, but at that point who cares,..he still can get away. He is not "trapped".

                  Ill never see that rationale for assuming that a killer who has a track record of public venues and short spans of time to do his work suddenly decides to try private small rooms with virtually no escape should he be spotted. I don't see any evidence that the killer of Polly, Annie or Kate was seeking longer stays with a person he has just killed. He kills, he cuts, and he leaves the body to be found shortly thereafter. The room in Millers Court was left locked, the curtains drawn. That's "to be found shortly thereafter?" She could have been in that room all day had Bowyer not gone for some rent.

                  Its my belief that the killer of Polly and Annie might have watched the crowds gather as part of the exhilaration he was seeking. That's why he wanted the bodies found soon after.
                  Michael Richards

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Michael W Richards View Post
                    The entrance to the courtyard is a long stone archway, anyone entering the courtyard or leaving it could be easily spotted. Once in the room, with his back turned towards the window if you factor in the physicality of the situation, he is essentially very trap-able.

                    I agree with Sam that vaulting over fences would wake everyone with windows open facing that yard, but at that point who cares,..he still can get away. He is not "trapped".

                    Ill never see that rationale for assuming that a killer who has a track record of public venues and short spans of time to do his work suddenly decides to try private small rooms with virtually no escape should he be spotted. I don't see any evidence that the killer of Polly, Annie or Kate was seeking longer stays with a person he has just killed. He kills, he cuts, and he leaves the body to be found shortly thereafter. The room in Millers Court was left locked, the curtains drawn. That's "to be found shortly thereafter?" She could have been in that room all day had Bowyer not gone for some rent.

                    Its my belief that the killer of Polly and Annie might have watched the crowds gather as part of the exhilaration he was seeking. That's why he wanted the bodies found soon after.
                    Not if the killer, like most serialists, was an opportunist. A lot of the working gals back then didn't have the "luxury" of their own digs. Nichols & Chapman had been living in lodging houses before their deaths. However, this time the killer was able to procure a victim with her place, and more time to indulge his depraved fantasy.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                      If you ask me, a population of 250,000 in the "vicious, semi-criminal" milieu of Late Victorian Whitechapel strikes me as a fertile breeding-ground for killers of all types, whether serial or otherwise.
                      Whitechapel in 1888 in terms of population density, poverty and crime is not exclusive or unique in the calculation considerations I provided.

                      There are plenty of places around the world with the exact same conditions and yet none of them have produced anything remotely like two serial killers operating even in much larger areas and in greater populations than Whitechapel, before 1888, after 1888, in the 1900s through to the 1950s through to the 1980s through to today. Nothing remotely like it.

                      This is because there is no direct link between sexual serial killings and poverty. The link is mostly between sex workers and where they work.

                      Basically, poverty and crime doesn't produce serial killers. It produces potential victims.
                      Bona fide canonical and then some.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by rjpalmer View Post
                        Abby: Abberline was going to write to Macnaghten, but his arm was still recovering from a gardening accident, and he didn't write. The interview spared him the effort. It is unknown if he wrote at a later date, and no one knows what he would have written. So to claim that Abberline's extensive writings don't mention Hutchinson is utterly ridiculous. Those extensive writings don't exist any more than Ben's extensive police reports mentioning witnesses after Nov 1888.
                        RJ

                        Abby: Abberline was going to write to Macnaghten, but his arm was still recovering from a gardening accident, and he didn't write. The interview spared him the effort. Hi RJ

                        Give me a break-

                        Pall Mall Gazette
                        24 March 1903

                        " I had just commenced, not knowing anything about the report in the newspaper, to write to the Assistant Commissioner of Police, Mr. Macnaghten, to say how strongly I was impressed with the opinion that 'Chapman' was also the author of the Whitechapel murders. Your appearance saves me the trouble. I intended to write on Friday, but a fall in the garden, injuring my hand and shoulder, prevented my doing so until today."
                        Mr. Abberline had already covered a page and a half of foolscap, and was surrounded with a sheaf of documents and newspaper cuttings dealing with the ghastly outrages of 1888.


                        Those extensive writings don't exist any more than Ben's extensive police reports mentioning witnesses after Nov 1888
                        Ben didn't say "police reports" he said police documents-which would include the MM. which was pretty extensive.


                        Like I said old chap, if your going to be snide about it, at least get it right and try to remember what other have tried to correctly point out to you.
                        "Is all that we see or seem
                        but a dream within a dream?"

                        -Edgar Allan Poe


                        "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                        quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                        -Frederick G. Abberline

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by rjpalmer View Post
                          Yup, and as far as we know, he wrote in glowing terms of George Hutchinson, and this glowing endorsement is what made it into the introduction of The Trial of George Chapman by Hargrave Lee Adam (1930) which tips its hat to the trustworthy George.


                          I seem to have ruffled Abby's feathers, but I'm just trying to help the poor kid out, as she stumbles down the road to reason. There is nothing in the record to suggest Hutch was discredited...just speculation piled on speculation.


                          If I had to hire a detective, I would hire a gullible one. The worst he could do is waste time following a false lead; the skeptical detective, on the other hand, will throw away the most vital clue that solves the case, thinking it is just more horsesh*ite. RP
                          RJ

                          I seem to have ruffled Abby's feathers, but I'm just trying to help the poor kid out, as she stumbles down the road to reason.

                          Thanks old chap, but I don't need your help-especially your delusions of Grandeur, patronizing tone, and faulty memory.
                          "Is all that we see or seem
                          but a dream within a dream?"

                          -Edgar Allan Poe


                          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                          -Frederick G. Abberline

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Batman View Post
                            Basically, poverty and crime doesn't produce serial killers. It produces potential victims.
                            Prey need predators. Besides, if you think that the social backdrop that spawned concurrent serial killers like Bonin and Kraft is no different from the awful privation and endemic thuggishness of the Victorian East End slums, perhaps you should think again.
                            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                            "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                            Comment


                            • Anyway, Batman, none of this has much, if anything, to do with the topic of this thread.
                              Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                              "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by rjpalmer View Post
                                Yup, and as far as we know, he wrote in glowing terms of George Hutchinson, and this glowing endorsement is what made it into the introduction of The Trial of George Chapman by Hargrave Lee Adam (1930) which tips its hat to the trustworthy George.


                                I seem to have ruffled Abby's feathers, but I'm just trying to help the poor kid out, as she stumbles down the road to reason. There is nothing in the record to suggest Hutch was discredited...just speculation piled on speculation.


                                If I had to hire a detective, I would hire a gullible one. The worst he could do is waste time following a false lead; the skeptical detective, on the other hand, will throw away the most vital clue that solves the case, thinking it is just more horsesh*ite. RP
                                RJ

                                Yup, and as far as we know, he wrote in glowing terms of George Hutchinson, and this glowing endorsement is what made it into the introduction of The Trial of George Chapman by Hargrave Lee Adam (1930) which tips its hat to the trustworthy George.

                                wow-talk about desperation and clutching at straws!!


                                There is nothing in the record to suggest Hutch was discredited...just speculation piled on speculation.

                                yeah. like the contemporary news reports stating he had been discredited and his story was of reduced importance. lets just forget about that (like I said, your memory seems to be not up to snuff) and go with some second hand musings of a writer decades later.
                                "Is all that we see or seem
                                but a dream within a dream?"

                                -Edgar Allan Poe


                                "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                                quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                                -Frederick G. Abberline

                                Comment

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