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Was John Richardson Jack the Ripper?

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  • Originally posted by Pierre View Post
    Why do you think there is a "reasonable chance" that Millwood was attacked by the same person who did the C5?
    Because her attack is similar to Martha Tabram's, who I believe was killed by JtR. And because I believe JtR probably had a few failed attempts, while he figured out the best method for his attacks.
    Cheers,
    Pandora.

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    • Originally posted by Pandora View Post
      Because her attack is similar to Martha Tabram's, who I believe was killed by JtR. And because I believe JtR probably had a few failed attempts, while he figured out the best method for his attacks.
      totally agree

      plus she was more than likely an unfortunate, her abdomen was targeted with a knife and it happened very close to the tabram attack.Plus her attacker, like the ripper, got away.
      "Is all that we see or seem
      but a dream within a dream?"

      -Edgar Allan Poe


      "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
      quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

      -Frederick G. Abberline

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      • ÂThe period of the 1880's was marked by disputes between Horner and the Whitechapel District Board of Works, and by his rebuilding and enclosure of the market area. In about 187980 he obtained an injunction against the sale of goods in the public streets surrounding the market without the payment of market tolls. (fn. 68) There was resistance to the claim to levy tolls in these streets and in North, South, East and West Streets, and Homer's rights in these streets were challenged by the Whitechapel Board, which was concerned at the obstruction of the streets surrounding the market and particularly of Commercial Street. Prolonged legal action followed and resulted in the decision that the market was without metes bounds and in the confirmation of the right of the owner of the market-franchise to collect tolls wherever the market in fact extended. It was judged that the market days were limited to Thursday and Saturday, as specified in Charles II's patent. By this time, however, the market was in fact held on all weekdays, and no serious attempt seems to have been made to restrict its use to two days. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/sur...27-147#h2-0002
        So - the Market was open officially on Thursdays and Saturdays, in practice, every day but Sunday.

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        • Most poor people lived as near to their work as they possibly could in those days, otherwise it would cost them money for tram fares etc. It happened in large cities everywhere. There's nothing sinister in John Richardson living near the Market nor (considering how close together the localities of these attacks are) in residing near to them.

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          • Originally posted by Pandora View Post
            Because her attack is similar to Martha Tabram's, who I believe was killed by JtR. And because I believe JtR probably had a few failed attempts, while he figured out the best method for his attacks.
            Hi Pandora,

            agree with you, it is certainly possible, and indeed some serial killers do start with lesser/failed attacks

            Steve

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Rosella View Post
              Most poor people lived as near to their work as they possibly could in those days, otherwise it would cost them money for tram fares etc. It happened in large cities everywhere. There's nothing sinister in John Richardson living near the Market nor (considering how close together the localities of these attacks are) in residing near to them.
              At the very least they wanted to be in walking distance.

              But that was a lot further than we would consider walking distance today.
              G U T

              There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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