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  • New suspect book.

    Hello, my new book Jack the Ripper Suspects, by C J Morley. Is out today. And is available on Amazon. This book looks at the candidacy of 365 suspects, many not on the casebook, in the A to Z, or in any other publication.

    My research for this book has discovered new information on the following individuals. *William Bury, *Collingwood Hilton Fenwick. *Pc Imhoff. *Mr Joscelyn. *Newland Francis Forester Smith. *John Benjamin Perryman. Miss Bidwell. *PC Gurtner. H.C. Kromschroeder. To name but a few.

    Product details

    • Paperback: 490 pages
    • 1st edition (September 12, 2018)
    • Language: English
    • ISBN-10: 1727300947
    • ISBN-13: 978-1727300949
    • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches

  • #2
    Hi CJ
    Love to know more about the book -how you have expanded from the 150.Differences to the other encyclopedia just published by Paul williams
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1599481483654928/
    Maybe post here or consider joining also our book group?

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice work, Chris. Good to have an updated version of this classic!
      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

      Comment


      • #4
        New Suspect Book

        Thank you for those kind words Sam.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi CJ
          Love to know more about the book -how you have expanded from the 150.Differences to the other encyclopedia just published by Paul williams

          Hello DaisyHall, the book differs greatly from the book 150 suspects, due to the size this is 490 pages long, and now covers 365 suspects, so more in depth information is available about each suspect. Including lots of family history, on each suspect wherever possible. Many suspects are new and exclusive to this book. The information on William Henry Bury for example is 17 pages long. And through my research for the first time uncovers previously unknown information about a family member.

          Maybe post here or consider joining also our book group?

          Thank you for the kind invite to join your book group, but I'm 84 years of age, a bit old to be joining facebook.

          I am sorry but I'm not aware of the book by Paul Williams, so could not comment.

          I have posted a suspect example from my new book.

          JAMES GLEN

          James Glen, 29 years of age, a cabinet maker, described as a quite-looking man, of small stature, about 5ft 6 inches in height, with a small dark moustache. Was charged with having on the 10 or 11 November 1889, in his house at 245 High Street, Glasgow, known locally as “the Green Close”, murdered his wife, Elizabeth, (née) Clinton, by beating, cutting, and stabbing her. He had been married about six years, and had three young children. (Some newspaper accounts state four children). Elizabeth was described as a sober, industrious woman, stoutly built, about 5ft 4 inches in height, and 30 years of age. At eleven o'clock the neighbours distinctly heard screams and cries of “murder!” as this was an everyday occurrence in Green Close, one of the poorer districts of the city no one paid any attention. Shortly after Glen came out of the house in an excited state, and said to one of his neighbours that he “Had done for her now.” He went to visit his father, James Glen, at 26 Duke Street, Glasgow, and the two proceeded to Dr Chalmers house in George Street. He had previously visited his father in one of his mad fits, and was taken to the doctor and given some medicine, which had soothed him when in a similar state. Glen told the Dr, he had done something to his wife, the Dr, went into the street, whistled and summoned two policemen. Glen was swiftly taken into custody. The police on reaching the small apartment, discovered the fearfully mutilated body of Elizabeth. They were forty wounds upon it, the most serious, injuries being upon the neck and abdomen, through which the bowels protruded. The neck had evidently been mutilated with a hatchet, which was found near the body, covered in blood, with pieces of hair still attached. Two bloody knives were also found. One a white handled pocket knife, the other a table knife. She was wearing only a chemise and stockings. When questioned by the newspapers, neighbours said the couple lived happily enough together. Mary Hoey, the next door neighbour at 245 High Street, said Glen and his wife did not quarrel. On the night of the murder she heard something being pulled up and down the house, then a heavy fall, then Mrs Glen squealing, it went quiet after that. Another neighbour Patrick Rocke, heard fearful wild cries by Glen, the likes of which he had never heard before. The prisoner’s father, said his son had been delicate for the past 12 months, and always complained of pain through his body. He suffered from delusions, one such delusion was that his wife was trying to poison his beef-tea. He offered the tea first to his wife and then the cat, both refused. He said he had frequently killed fellow-workmen, and hid them in boxes. He was under the delusion that he was “Jack the Ripper” and other murderers. Dr J. F. Sutherland, kept Glen under observation, and prepared a report on his mental condition, the conclusion he arrived at initially was at the time of the commission of the murder, he was of unsound mind. He later changed his opinion and declared that Glen is now sound of mind. His symptoms and past history seemed to point to delirium tremens as the cause of his mental state. The plea of not guilty, was supplemented by one of insanity. Glen was found guilty of murder while insane, and detained at her majesty's pleasure.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi CJ,

            365 suspects, one for each day of the year. What fun.

            Good luck with your book.

            Regards,

            Simon
            Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cjmorley View Post
              Hi CJ
              Love to know more about the book -how you have expanded from the 150.Differences to the other encyclopedia just published by Paul williams

              Hello DaisyHall, the book differs greatly from the book 150 suspects, due to the size this is 490 pages long, and now covers 365 suspects, so more in depth information is available about each suspect. Including lots of family history, on each suspect wherever possible. Many suspects are new and exclusive to this book. The information on William Henry Bury for example is 17 pages long. And through my research for the first time uncovers previously unknown information about a family member.

              Maybe post here or consider joining also our book group?

              Thank you for the kind invite to join your book group, but I'm 84 years of age, a bit old to be joining facebook.

              I am sorry but I'm not aware of the book by Paul Williams, so could not comment.

              I have posted a suspect example from my new book.

              JAMES GLEN

              James Glen, 29 years of age, a cabinet maker, described as a quite-looking man, of small stature, about 5ft 6 inches in height, with a small dark moustache. Was charged with having on the 10 or 11 November 1889, in his house at 245 High Street, Glasgow, known locally as “the Green Close”, murdered his wife, Elizabeth, (née) Clinton, by beating, cutting, and stabbing her. He had been married about six years, and had three young children. (Some newspaper accounts state four children). Elizabeth was described as a sober, industrious woman, stoutly built, about 5ft 4 inches in height, and 30 years of age. At eleven o'clock the neighbours distinctly heard screams and cries of “murder!” as this was an everyday occurrence in Green Close, one of the poorer districts of the city no one paid any attention. Shortly after Glen came out of the house in an excited state, and said to one of his neighbours that he “Had done for her now.” He went to visit his father, James Glen, at 26 Duke Street, Glasgow, and the two proceeded to Dr Chalmers house in George Street. He had previously visited his father in one of his mad fits, and was taken to the doctor and given some medicine, which had soothed him when in a similar state. Glen told the Dr, he had done something to his wife, the Dr, went into the street, whistled and summoned two policemen. Glen was swiftly taken into custody. The police on reaching the small apartment, discovered the fearfully mutilated body of Elizabeth. They were forty wounds upon it, the most serious, injuries being upon the neck and abdomen, through which the bowels protruded. The neck had evidently been mutilated with a hatchet, which was found near the body, covered in blood, with pieces of hair still attached. Two bloody knives were also found. One a white handled pocket knife, the other a table knife. She was wearing only a chemise and stockings. When questioned by the newspapers, neighbours said the couple lived happily enough together. Mary Hoey, the next door neighbour at 245 High Street, said Glen and his wife did not quarrel. On the night of the murder she heard something being pulled up and down the house, then a heavy fall, then Mrs Glen squealing, it went quiet after that. Another neighbour Patrick Rocke, heard fearful wild cries by Glen, the likes of which he had never heard before. The prisoner’s father, said his son had been delicate for the past 12 months, and always complained of pain through his body. He suffered from delusions, one such delusion was that his wife was trying to poison his beef-tea. He offered the tea first to his wife and then the cat, both refused. He said he had frequently killed fellow-workmen, and hid them in boxes. He was under the delusion that he was “Jack the Ripper” and other murderers. Dr J. F. Sutherland, kept Glen under observation, and prepared a report on his mental condition, the conclusion he arrived at initially was at the time of the commission of the murder, he was of unsound mind. He later changed his opinion and declared that Glen is now sound of mind. His symptoms and past history seemed to point to delirium tremens as the cause of his mental state. The plea of not guilty, was supplemented by one of insanity. Glen was found guilty of murder while insane, and detained at her majesty's pleasure.
              So who suspected him of being the Ripper?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
                Hi CJ,

                365 suspects, one for each day of the year. What fun.

                Good luck with your book.

                Regards,

                Simon
                Good to see Simon on here. Hope you are well?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Himself, He was under the delusion that he was “Jack the Ripper”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cjmorley View Post
                    Himself, He was under the delusion that he was “Jack the Ripper”
                    Ah, so he wasn't sure, just suspected he might be the Ripper? Did he say 'I think I may be Jack the Ripper'?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm sure he was sure.

                      Comment

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