Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

    The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

    Over at How's Ripperlogical Emporium:

    http://jtrforums.com/showthread.php?t=32031

    Johnathan Hainworth and Christine Ward-Agius's pre-publication blub

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Escape-Jack...s%2C193&sr=1-3

    Go to it...

    (Avoid working yourself into a apoplectic fit mind...)
    Last edited by mpriestnall; 08-16-2019, 04:14 PM.
    It was me. I let the dogs out.

  • #2
    Does any know if any records are extant and accessible relating to either Bosanquet or Jelf?

    Has any of the Druitt suspect authors (Leighton, Howells, Skinner, Handworth, Ward-Agius) or anyone else for that matter, tried this line of enquiry?

    As you know, available here on Casebook and JTRForums there's been some excellent work on Druitt, trying to alibi him eg with his work, cricket matches and so on. I'm suggesting the Bosenquet/Jelf line of enquiry might be tried for the same reason.

    Martyn
    It was me. I let the dogs out.

    Comment


    • #3
      Blub from amazon.co.uk

      Quote
      The identity of Jack the Ripper is the most infamous mystery of the Victorian era. Montague Druitt was the original police suspect, but we have never had the full story before, and endless speculation in later books and documentaries: But it was him, after all: The toff in a top hat. Jack the Oxonian. The Victorian equivalent of Ted Bundy: young, handsome, professional and homicidal. Today, the average member of the public has actually never heard of the drowned Druitt; this century he has not been the subject of either a best seller, or movie. The fresh material and sources in the new book are not found in any other publication, including the following USPs:

      - Druitt was a medical student who dropped out.
      - As a barrister, Druitt defended a murderer and tried to blame a prostitute for the crime.
      - A blood-stained Druitt was arrested in Whitechapel but bluffed his way to freedom by pretending he was still studying medicine.
      - Druitt was placed by his family, albeit briefly, in a private, French asylum but had to flee as the police's dragnet closed.
      - The Vicar who published parts of the truth in 1899 has been finally identified (Reverend Arthur Du Boulay Hill)
      - The famous writer and police chief Melville Macnaghten's close pal, George Sims, published a profile of the un-named Druitt as early as 1891: a young toff, slightly built but athletic, who was not a qualified doctor and who had killed himself. This newly discovered source proves, once and for all, that the police chief and the famous writer knew exactly who Montie Druitt was and was not.
      - the Druitt family tried, fumblingly, to alert the authorities that The Ripper was deceased whilst remaining anonymous.

      This is the real story of Druitt, the Ripper.

      Unquote

      Martyn
      It was me. I let the dogs out.

      Comment


      • #4
        One small problem it's highly unlikely Druitt was Jack.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks John. I couldn't agree more.

          My view is if Druitt has any connection to the case, it's he was murdered because he knew the identity of the actual murderer.

          I have my own candidate who has some parallels and links to Druitt.

          This is just a possibility that I'm willing to entertain. It's a notion that's probably not knowable or provable.

          Martyn
          It was me. I let the dogs out.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm sorry, barnflatwyngarde got there before me.

            This thread is a duplicate of:

            https://forum.casebook.org/forum/rip...t-the-cover-up

            Martyn

            It was me. I let the dogs out.

            Comment

            Working...
            X