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Definition of 'Ripper'

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  • Definition of 'Ripper'

    In his book, "Jack the Ripper - The Simple Truth" (which my lovely lady wife has kindly bought me as Covid-19 reading material) Bruce Paley makes the case for Joseph Barnett and postulates that the "Dear Boss" and "Saucy Jack" were sent by the killer. These, of course, were the first recorded use of the soubriquet "Jack the Ripper". The word "jack" means (among other things) to raise or lift. The word "rip" means (again among other things) a wicker basket. The word "ripper" means (similarly) a person who carries fish inland for sale. Doesn't someone who carries fish sound a bit like a fish porter? It does to me - and a sick joke of that kind would be of a piece with the sneering tone of the missives themselves.
    "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

  • #2
    "Jack" is also used as a catchall generic term for someone working as a labourer. At the time of the murders Barnett's present and most recent past occupations were "labourer" and "fish porter". Labourer = Jack. Fish Porter = Ripper.
    "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

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    • #3
      Hello Bridewell,

      Google says that rip also means "move forcefully and rapidly." Could that have been Druitt bragging of his athletic prowess? It can also mean "a fraud or swindle." Could that be Tunblety poking a little fun at himself?

      If someone had the time and inclination I think they could probably make any of the known suspects fit the bill somehow.

      So while it is an interesting idea I also think it is pretty much of a non-starter. Sorry.

      c.d.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by c.d. View Post
        Hello Bridewell,

        Google says that rip also means "move forcefully and rapidly." Could that have been Druitt bragging of his athletic prowess? It can also mean "a fraud or swindle." Could that be Tunblety poking a little fun at himself?

        If someone had the time and inclination I think they could probably make any of the known suspects fit the bill somehow.

        So while it is an interesting idea I also think it is pretty much of a non-starter. Sorry.

        c.d.
        That's fine. As I posted on Howard's forum, in reply to Trevor, it's probably just a coincidence but Barnett was a labourer who had previously worked as a fish porter.
        "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

        Comment


        • #5
          It's an interesting little coincidence. I suppose'Jack' could be used in the context of 'Jack it in', so maybe it's a cryptic clue that he wanted the police to stop him, to 'Jack' the Ripper.
          That's the thing with these cryptic messages, they're meant to point to a suspect, but are so vague no one would ever figure it out. The Old Bill took the Dear Boss seriously, but I can't imagine a scenario where a budding Tec says "chief, maybe that sobriquet actually alludes to a fish porter. We don't have a fish porter suspect at this time, but if a victim shows up who is connected to one, bingo, we'll have our man"
          Still, going by the moniker 'Joe the Fishman' wouldn't strike fear into the heart of London.

          Wait a minute.......codding? Cod? It was him all along! What a bastard.
          Them's the vagaries.

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          • #6
            If the killer wants to taunt the police and show how clever he is then he has to at least provide some sort of clues that the police could actually understand and act upon. Too cryptic and it sort of defeats the point.

            c.d.

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            • #7
              Based on Jack Sheridan (the Ripper).

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              • #8
                isnt ripper also the english slang for sausage?
                "Is all that we see or seem
                but a dream within a dream?"

                -Edgar Allan Poe


                "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                -Frederick G. Abberline

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
                  isnt ripper also the english slang for sausage?
                  If it is, I've never heard this!

                  Are you thinking of " banger" as in bangers & mash, Abby?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
                    isnt ripper also the english slang for sausage?
                    Depends on how big a sausage your describing!
                    Them's the vagaries.

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                    • #11
                      Would you believe a deep fried hot dog is known as a jack?
                      Last edited by DJA; 05-05-2020, 10:23 PM.
                      My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DJA View Post
                        Would you believe a deep fried hot dog is known as a jack?
                        So in Aussie parlance would a really good deep fried hotdog be a "ripper jack" ?

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                        • #13
                          Would you believe a deep fried hot dog that splits is known as a ripper?

                          How about .... ouch! ....
                          My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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