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Can this be posted? Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons. Part 1

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  • Can this be posted? Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons. Part 1

    Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Investig. Psych. Offender Profil. 2: 1–21 (2005)​

    Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling
    J. Investig. Psych. Offender Profil. 2: 1–21 (2005)
    Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/jip.22
    The Jack the Ripper Murders: A Modus Operandi and Signature Analysis of the 1888–1891 Whitechapel Murders
    ROBERT D. KEPPEL, JOSEPH G. WEIS, KATHERINE M. BROWN, and KRISTEN WELCH
    1Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, USA 1University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

    Abstract
    A number of females, commonly recognized as 11 victims, were murdered in separate events in Whitechapel, London between 1888 and 1891. An evaluation of the murders revealed that six of those murders were linked by a number of distinct, personal signature characteristics, including picquerism, overkill, incapacitation, domination and control, open and displayed, unusual body position, sexual degradation, mutilation, organ har- vesting, specific areas of attack, preplanning and organization, and a combination of sig- nature features. The signature characteristics observed in these infamous Jack the Ripper murders were compared to a 1981–1995 cohort of 3359 homicide cases from Washington State’s HITS database. The analysis revealed that the signature displayed in six of the Whitechapel murders was extremely rare. There were only six records of female victims, one a prostitute, with probed, explored, or mutilated body cavities. There were only two cases, both females who were not prostitutes, where the body was left in an unusual posi- tion and body cavities were explored, probed, or mutilated. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Key words: forensic science; serial murder; signature murder; criminal profiling; crime scene assessment; picquerism; Jack the Ripper

    INTRODUCTION
    Between 1888 and 1891, 11 female victims were murdered in the Whitechapel area of London. At the time, it was not known which of the crimes had been committed by the same killer. To date, there is still wide debate on which victims can be attributed to the same murderer.
    Last edited by Admin; 01-12-2023, 09:49 AM. Reason: Removed excessive information that violates Marjor Rule

  • #2
    What point are you trying to make .?
    'It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is. It doesn't matter how smart you are . If it doesn't agree with experiment, its wrong'' . Richard Feynman

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    • #3
      Can this be posted?

      ​Looks like you've answered your own question.

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      • #4
        Fishy and m, it’s a very fascinating article about JTR but I decided not to copy each page and post until I got an okay from someone monitoring these boards. If you haven’t read it, the authors do a terrific job that I have not seen anywhere. Apparently, JTR is a very unique case. If this posting was not permitted, I saved another hour posting the rest. Why is everyone so nasty on here?

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        • #5
          Major Rule # 3

          This is my once again, refrain, to all posters, to READ, the rules. It's amazing what you can learn, if you read the instruction manual.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kwanitaka View Post
            Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Investig. Psych. Offender Profil. 2: 1–21 (2005)​

            Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling
            Article has been discussed numerous times. Best to just post a link back to the article.

            Something I just noticed from the above: 'the knife was narrow and thin with a sharp blade, approximately 6 to 8 inches in length Evans & Gainey, 1998; Gordon, 2001; Sugden, 2002; Evans & Skinner, 2000; 2001)' - was the knife really that long? The main ripping injuries to the abdomen originated, I suspect, as violent stabs and then ripped along. After all, he wasn't tickling them with his knife. If the knife was that long, wouldn't the internal organs below have been stabbed and cut through all over? I know that was the case with some of Eddowes organs. Not sure about the others. A very long knife like that doesn't sound very practical for transporting in a pocket, getting out quickly and putting away quickly if needed. What is the actual evidence for a long knife?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Aethelwulf View Post

              Article has been discussed numerous times. Best to just post a link back to the article.

              Something I just noticed from the above: 'the knife was narrow and thin with a sharp blade, approximately 6 to 8 inches in length Evans & Gainey, 1998; Gordon, 2001; Sugden, 2002; Evans & Skinner, 2000; 2001)' - was the knife really that long? The main ripping injuries to the abdomen originated, I suspect, as violent stabs and then ripped along. After all, he wasn't tickling them with his knife. If the knife was that long, wouldn't the internal organs below have been stabbed and cut through all over? I know that was the case with some of Eddowes organs. Not sure about the others. A very long knife like that doesn't sound very practical for transporting in a pocket, getting out quickly and putting away quickly if needed. What is the actual evidence for a long knife?
              Dr Phillips at Chapman's Inquest ......

              [Coroner] Was the instrument used at the throat the same as that used at the abdomen? - Very probably. It must have been a very sharp knife, probably with a thin, narrow blade, and at least six to eight inches in length, and perhaps longer.
              [Coroner] Is it possible that any instrument used by a military man, such as a bayonet, would have done it? - No; it would not be a bayonet.
              [Coroner] Would it have been such an instrument as a medical man uses for post-mortem examinations? - The ordinary post-mortem case perhaps does not contain such a weapon.​
              My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DJA View Post

                Dr Phillips at Chapman's Inquest ......

                [Coroner] Was the instrument used at the throat the same as that used at the abdomen? - Very probably. It must have been a very sharp knife, probably with a thin, narrow blade, and at least six to eight inches in length, and perhaps longer.
                [Coroner] Is it possible that any instrument used by a military man, such as a bayonet, would have done it? - No; it would not be a bayonet.
                [Coroner] Would it have been such an instrument as a medical man uses for post-mortem examinations? - The ordinary post-mortem case perhaps does not contain such a weapon.​
                Yes I know that, but what is the reasoning: It must have been a very sharp knife, probably with a thin, narrow blade, and at least six to eight inches in length, and perhaps longer - what is the actual evidence from the injuries that necessitates such a long knife being used?

                Also, I assume the 6-8 inch knife estimate is just talking about the blade. I've just had a look a several knives in my kitchen and come to the conclusion for a knife to be useable it needs to have a minimum 4 inch handle. Was Jtr really going about with a 10-12 inch instrument in his pocket?
                Last edited by Aethelwulf; 01-12-2023, 10:27 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aethelwulf View Post

                  Yes I know that, but what is the reasoning: It must have been a very sharp knife, probably with a thin, narrow blade, and at least six to eight inches in length, and perhaps longer - what is the actual evidence from the injuries that necessitates such a long knife being used?

                  Also, I assume the 6-8 inch knife estimate is just talking about the blade. I've just had a look a several knives in my kitchen and come to the conclusion for a knife to be useable it needs to have a minimum 4 inch handle. Was Jtr really going about with a 10-12 inch instrument in his pocket?
                  Perhaps Phillips knew more than most suspect.

                  Guess who passed by his house to and from work at Pathology at the London Hospital for many years.

                  Um ...... no it wasn't Bury
                  My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DJA View Post

                    Perhaps Phillips knew more than most suspect.

                    Guess who passed by his house to and from work at Pathology at the London Hospital for many years.

                    Um ...... no it wasn't Bury
                    I hate to break this to you, but the theory of HGS as the ripper belongs in the full on/all out/bells and whistles stupid category.

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                    • #11
                      My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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                      • #12
                        I take Aethelwulf's point about the difficulty transporting a long knife to the murder scene. Both at Berners street and at Miller's Court there was a sighting of a man carrying a parcel plausibly sized and shaped to contain a knife. Maybe a co-conspirator carried JTR's knife for him and perhaps wrapped in a change of coat or overall?


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                        • #13
                          a 10-12 inch knife would be easy to conceal on ones person, especially if they were wearing a coat. even if the pockets werent big/long enough to conceal the knife, for someone intent on doing what the ripper was doing, it would be peanuts to alter their clothing and or pockets to conceal a knife of that size.
                          "Is all that we see or seem
                          but a dream within a dream?"

                          -Edgar Allan Poe


                          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                          -Frederick G. Abberline

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                          • #14
                            Crocodile Dundee - That is not a knife scene! - YouTube
                            My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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                            • #15
                              Click image for larger version

Name:	Tieman2.jpg
Views:	173
Size:	288.1 KB
ID:	802725 Might have had a handle.
                              My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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