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Sor, Sir and the i-dot

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  • Sor, Sir and the i-dot

    There is a debate concerning whether this word should be transcribed as "Sor" or "Sir." An observation I wanted to make is that every lower case "i" in the Lusk letter is accompanied by an i-dot. Since there is no i-dot in this word, that would suggest it should be transcribed as "Sor" (unless one wishes to make this word the lone exception).
    “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

    William Bury, Victorian Murderer
    http://www.williambury.org

  • #2
    I've never seen it transcribed as anything but "Sor," and wasn't aware that there was a debate.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RivkahChaya View Post
      I've never seen it transcribed as anything but "Sor," and wasn't aware that there was a debate.
      I have seen it discussed on another thread. I think the argument for 'Sir' is that the writer was in the habit of adding a superfluous up-stroke at the end of some words. If that is factored in the word looks like 'Sir' with an undotted 'i'.

      Regards, Bridewell.
      "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RivkahChaya View Post
        I've never seen it transcribed as anything but "Sor," and wasn't aware that there was a debate.
        It's actually been given as "Sir" on many occasions in books, including reference works. To get some sense of this, go to Google Books and do a search on the exact phrase "mr lusk sir i send you."
        “When a major serial killer case is finally solved and all the paperwork completed, police are sometimes amazed at how obvious the killer was and how they were unable to see what was right before their noses.” —Robert D. Keppel and William J. Birnes, The Psychology of Serial Killer Investigations

        William Bury, Victorian Murderer
        http://www.williambury.org

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