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Dr. George Bagster Phillips

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  • #76
    Hi Tom,

    What I have read suggests that Doctor Phillips knew more than he was willing/permitted to admit, but I have never thought he was duplicitous. I think he simply did his duty—whatever it might have involved. By his own admission he was not a "free agent".

    Regards,

    Simon
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

    Comment


    • #77
      Its interesting that while trying to ascertain how an accomplice might have assisted after the fact, no-one mentioned that Wideawake Hat could have been that man for Blotchy Face.

      Mary Ann saw Blotchy, Sarah saw Wideawake, but nobody knows when Blotchy left. Wideawake might be the man Simon suggests.

      Since were looking for an accomplice, a suspicious unknown person watching the location of a murder in progress, or soon to occur, seems to fit the bill.

      And it happens when Mary might still be alive...as contrasted by Mrs Maxwells conversation with Mary the morning of the 9th.

      Best regards.

      Comment


      • #78
        Obituary

        Hello all,

        Additional snippet about George Bagster Phillips, M.R.C.S., L.M.Eng., L.S.A.Lond, an obituary in the BMJ, (British Medical Journal)

        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...407870/?page=1

        best wishes

        Phil
        Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


        Justice for the 96 = achieved
        Accountability? ....

        Comment


        • #79
          This is regarding the knife found by Thomas Coram on Whitechapel Road, and presented at the Stride inquest. The Daily Telegraph commented:

          The production of the knife created some sensation, its discovery not having been generally known. It was a knife such as would be used by a baker in his trade, it being flat at the top instead of pointed, as a butcher's knife would be. The blade, which was discoloured with something resembling blood, was quite a foot long and an inch broad, whilst the black handle was six inches in length, and strongly rivetted in three places.

          At the next day of the inquest, Dr Phillips said:

          The knife that was produced on the last occasion was delivered to me properly secured by Police constable 282 H. On examination I found it to be such a knife as is used in a chandler's shop, and is called a slicing knife. It has blood upon it, which has characteristics of the blood of a warm blooded animal. It has been recently blunted, and its edge turned by rubbing apparently on a stone such as a kerbstone. It evidently before was a very sharp knife. Such a knife could have produced the incision and injuries to the neck, but it is not such a weapon as I should have chosen to inflict the injuries in the present case; and if my opinion as regards the position of the body is correct, the knife in question would become an improbable instrument to have caused the incision.

          So the knife had mammalian blood on it, even though it had been blunted, apparently recently.
          Prior to being rubbed on a stone, it was evident (somehow), that the knife had been very sharp.
          Phillips then gave the reason for supposing it improbable that this was the knife used to make the incision...

          I have come to a conclusion as to the incision and also the perpetrator or the deed. I affirm that she was seized by the shoulder placed on the ground, and that the perpetrator of the deed was on her right side when he inflicted the cut. I am of opinion that the cut was made from the left to the right of the deceased, and therefore arises the unlikelihood of such a long knife causing the wound in the neck, taking into account the position of the incision. The knife I have seen was rounded at the point.

          So essentially the knife would have been too unwieldy to have been the murder weapon, given both the position of the victim relative to the murderer, and the position of the incision - which starts on the left, the same side as she was laying.
          Phillips also describes the knife as rounded at the point.

          The discovery of the knife was reported in the London Evening News, Oct 1:

          A KNIFE FOUND IN WHITECHAPEL-ROAD.

          Early this morning a police-constable was passing on his beat in the Whitechapel-road, when he came upon a black-handled knife, keen as a razor, and pointed like a carving-knife. The blade was ten inches long, about the length of weapon assumed by Dr. Phillips to have been used by the Hanbury-street murderer. It is looked upon by the police as supplying a link in the "man from Southampton arrest."


          Black handle, ten inch blade, razor sharp, and pointed like a carving knife.

          Fanny Mortimer: I was just about going to bed, sir, when I heard a call for the police. I ran to the door, and before I could open it I heard somebody say, 'Come out quick; there's a poor woman here that's had ten inches of cold steel in her.'
          Andrew's the man, that is not blamed for nothing

          Comment


          • #80
            The knife in question was blunt, and round ended. Isn't it time for you to stop winding up the genuine posters who contribute to this forum?

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by Observer View Post

              The knife in question was blunt, and round ended.
              An LEN reporter viewed the deceased at the mortuary...

              The cut in the woman's neck is not exactly as has been described by our morning contemporaries. It is not from ear to ear. The knife seems to have been stabbed in deeply at the left side to reach the external carotid, and to have emerged at the carotid on the right side. The superficial length of the wound is from three-and-a-half to four inches.

              Stabbed in deeply at the left side, apparently.
              Okay, so that is from a reporter, not a medical person.
              So let's look at both Phillips and Blackwell, at the inquest...

              Baxter: The knife produced on the last occasion was not sharp pointed, was it?

              That Wynne, is a loaded question.

              Phillips: No, it was rounded at the tip, which was about an inch across. The blade was wider at the base.

              Baxter: Was there anything to indicate that the cut on the neck of the deceased was made with a pointed knife?
              Phillips: Nothing.


              So the issue with the knife produced, was not that the end was rounded, but that it was too long, given the circumstances.
              Fairly clear so far. However...

              Blackwell: With respect to the knife which was found, I should like to say that I concur with Dr. Phillips in his opinion that, although it might possibly have inflicted the injury, it is an extremely unlikely instrument to have been used. It appears to me that a murderer, in using a round-pointed instrument, would seriously handicap himself, as he would be only able to use it in one particular way. I am told that slaughterers always use a sharp-pointed instrument.

              So Blackwell 'concurred' with Phillips, by contradicting him on the likely nature of the knife used - round vs sharp-pointed.
              Yet that must also mean Blackwell considered the cut to have possibly been made with a sharp-pointed knife - putting him at odds with Phillips, who said there was no evidence of a sharp-pointed knife, by the nature of the wound.
              Blackwell seems to be implying that the cut commenced with a stabbing action - rather than a shear - so in effect, agreeing with the LEN reporter.


              Baxter: No one has suggested that this crime was committed by a slaughterer.

              Just as no one has suggested (at the inquest, so far) that there were any grapes found in the yard or on the body, yet for some reason Baxter soon starts asking Blackwell these sort of questions.


              Blackwell: I simply intended to point out the inconvenience that might arise from using a blunt-pointed weapon.

              So after considering both doctor's testimony, it would seem the nature of the knife used, is unclear.
              However, there is still the huge anomaly between the Oct 1 press reports, which stated the knife found was as keen as a razor, and Phillips claiming that knife had recently been blunted on stone.

              Isn't it time for you to stop winding up the genuine posters who contribute to this forum?
              If quoting from press reports has the effect of winding up some posters, then I would suggest that those posters are not as genuine as you or they suppose they are.
              Last edited by NotBlamedForNothing; 02-05-2021, 12:24 PM.
              Andrew's the man, that is not blamed for nothing

              Comment


              • #82
                Let me start by quoting, in bold, this section from your post #79

                "The discovery of the knife was reported in the London Evening News, Oct 1:

                A KNIFE FOUND IN WHITECHAPEL-ROAD.

                Early this morning a police-constable was passing on his beat in the Whitechapel-road, when he came upon a black-handled knife, keen as a razor, and pointed like a carving-knife. The blade was ten inches long, about the length of weapon assumed by Dr. Phillips to have been used by the Hanbury-street murderer. It is looked upon by the police as supplying a link in the "man from Southampton arrest."

                Black handle, ten inch blade, razor sharp, and pointed like a carving knife.

                Fanny Mortimer: I was just about going to bed, sir, when I heard a call for the police. I ran to the door, and before I could open it I heard somebody say, 'Come out quick; there's a poor woman here that's had ten inches of cold steel in her.'"



                What exactly is you point(pun intended) here? You didn't qualify this "revelation"

                It's plain to me that the reporter has either not seen the knife as found by the PC, or is exaggerating it's appearance. Where did you get the quote from Mrs Mortimer? If by the same reporter might I suggest that he seems to be putting words into Mr's Mortimers mouth

                But again, I fail to see the point you are making above. It's obvious that the knife found by the PC was not the knife used to murder Liz Stride.

                Last edited by Observer; 02-05-2021, 01:59 PM.

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                • #83
                  By the way, most of us realise that some of the press reports pertaining to the Whitechapel murders are a joke. You might want to take that on board

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    "It's plain to me that the reporter has either not seen the knife as found by the PC, or is exaggerating it's appearance."

                    This isn't very clear, what I meant to say was, regardless of whether the reporter saw the knife in question or not he's exaggerating it's appearance.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Knife probably left by David Cohen on kerb next to Norah Christmas' laundry premise. Then Cohen goes inside, next door at Gertrude Smith's brothel at 254 Whitechapel Road. Leave an incriminating piece of evidence practically at one's doorstep? Who knows what goes through a deranged mind?

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