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Dr. JOHN REES GABE'S TWIN BROTHER: A WHO'S WHO

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  • David Orsam
    replied
    Thank you Simon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    Whatever makes you happy.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Not actually an answer to my question but close enough, thank you. So you must think it was pure coincidence that he was employed at a dispensary in close proximity to Dorset Street?

    And I assume you still think he turned up at Millers Court for some unknown and unfathomable medical reason connected to a child who did not exist and then abandoned that non-existent child to examine the dead body of Mary Jane Kelly.

    Nah, you know what. I think it's far more likely that he was there because he was employed as the resident medical officer at the dispensary just around the corner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    I do not believe that Dr. Gabe being employed at a dispensary in close proximity to Dorset Street was the reason for his being called to attend at the examination of the body of Mary Jane Kelly during the afternoon of 9th November 1888.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Very good. So do you accept that his being employed in a dispensary in such close proximity to Dorset Street might have been the reason for his being called to attend at the examination of the body of Mary Jane Kelly during the afternoon of 9 November 1888?

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    But more sense than you.

    So Dr. Gabe did not arrive in the morning.

    "No point in him being there any earlier."

    Quite so.

    It's very interesting how you're fitting together the pieces of this puzzle.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
    Hi David,

    Your mission, Mr. Phelps, is to place Dr. Gabe in Millers Court on the morning of 9th November 1888.

    But in doing so, you have to ask yourself why anyone would want to waste an hour-and-a-half or more of the good doctor's valuable time at the London Dispensary when entry to Room 13 wasn't until 1.30 pm, when, allegedly, John McCarthy took a pick-axe to the door, and the corpse became available for examination.
    Now, you're not making much sense; either that or you've answered your own question. The door was broken open at 1.30pm and Dr Gabe arrived shortly thereafter. No point him being there any earlier. Dr Bond had probably already been sent to Millers Court by Scotland Yard prior to the breaking open of the door. Hence there's no mystery as to why someone starting out in central London might arrive at about the same time as someone starting out from just over the road.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    Your mission, Mr. Phelps, is to place Dr. Gabe in Millers Court on the morning of 9th November 1888.

    But in doing so, you have to ask yourself why anyone would want to waste an hour-and-a-half or more of the good doctor's valuable time at the London Dispensary when entry to Room 13 wasn't until 1.30 pm, when, allegedly, John McCarthy took a pick-axe to the door, and the corpse became available for examination.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
    Hi David,

    Ridiculous to you, certainly.
    And ridiculous to anyone who understands the English language. The press report I cited - which is, of course, unconfirmed as to the facts - doesn't even say that Bond arrived before Gabe. They could, on the face of it, have arrived at precisely the same time. Or the journalist might have been listing the doctors who arrived after Phillips in order of seniority. Not that it matters because we have no idea when either Bond or Gabe heard that they were wanted and set off for Millers Court.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    Ridiculous to you, certainly.

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
    You may be taking the word 'resident' too literally.

    Why did he not arrive in Millers Court until after Dr. Bond at 1.50 pm?
    No, I don't think I am taking the word 'resident' too literally Simon.

    I wasn't aware that any record was actually made of the time of Dr Gabe's arrival in Millers Court. I'm sure you can't possibly be referring to this press report:

    "The whole space was closely packed with detective officers, and quite a small army of plain-clothes constables was located in Dorset Street within an astonishing short space of time. Dr. Phillips, the divisional surgeon of police, soon arrived, and was followed by Dr. Bond, of Westminster, divisional surgeon of the A Division, and Dr. J.R. Gabe, of Mecklenburgh Square; and two or three other surgeons."

    That would be ridiculous.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    You may be taking the word 'resident' too literally.

    Why did he not arrive in Millers Court until after Dr. Bond at 1.50 pm?

    Regards,

    Simon

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Well the good news, Simon, is that we can now place him as the resident medical officer of the dispensary at 21 Church Street on the morning of 9 November 1888. And, furthermore, we can physically place him as being very close to that location - within short walking distance in fact - on the same morning.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    Hi David,

    I'll accept it when Dr. John Rees Gabe can be placed at the London Dispensary, 21 Church Street, on the morning of 9th November 1888.

    Regards,

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon Wood; 04-18-2017, 10:52 AM. Reason: spolling mistook

    Leave a comment:


  • David Orsam
    replied
    Very good. So do you accept that his being employed in a dispensary in such close proximity to Dorset Street might have been the reason for his being called to attend at the examination of the body of Mary Jane Kelly during the morning of 9 November 1888?

    Leave a comment:

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