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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Victims > Annie Chapman

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  #1  
Old 09-05-2018, 02:49 AM
Michael W Richards Michael W Richards is offline
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Hi,

Ive suggested here for many years that the murder of Annie Chapman establishes a "bar" that is not met in any other murder within the Canonical Group, or on the extended list of possibles kept in the file.

Her murder was more specific, more clinical, than the other murders, and of course the most invasive to that date. Her face isn't marked. It would appear that her intestines were simply moved for ease of access. It would also appear that the items (or some of them) found about her were consciously put there. She lost rings from her fingers. The summation of the Inquest, covered below by the Bush Advocate newspaper in New Zealand on Nov 17th, indicates that there was strong belief that the man responsible was;

-Not insane
-Medically trained
-Had Post mortem skills with knife, anatomical knowledge beyond that of a slaughter-house man.

Dramatic as it was, and containing a suggestion that the organ obtained could be something that was sought to sell on a black market...a suggestion I believe was made to create an air of acceptance that people will kill and do these kinds of things, despite how abhorrent the idea is to the general public....this summation revealed more police ideology in terms of "killer profile" information than the others.

Here is the excerpt;

"Mr. Wynne Baxter on Wednesday resumed the inquest at Whitechapel on the body of Annie Chapman, who was murdered on 8th. inst. in the backyard of 29 Hanbury Street. The Coroner at one proceeded to sum up the evidence. He recalled the important facts of the case. It was in a Spitalfields lodging house that the deceased received the older bruises found on her temple and front of the chest, in a trumpery quarrel a week before her death. It was in one of these lodging houses that she was seen a few hours before her mangled remains were discovered. She was found dead about six o'clock. All was done with reckless daring. The murder seemed, like the Bucks Row case, to have been carried out without any cry. Sixteen people were in the house. The partitions of the rooms were of wood. The brute who committed the offence did not even take the trouble to cover up his ghastly work, but left the body expose to view. Probably as daylight broke he hurried away in fear. The Coroner then proceeded to observe - There are two things missing - her ring had been wrenched from her finger, and had not been found, and an organ had been taken away. The body had not been dissected, but the injuries had been made by some one with considerable anatomical knowledge and skill. There are no meaningless cuts. The organ has been taken away by one who knew where to find it, what difficulties he would have to contend against, and how he should use his knife so as to abstract the organ without injury to it any surgeon knows. No unskilled person could have known where to find it, or have recognised it when it was found. For instance, no mere slaughterer of animals could have carried out these operations. It must have been some one accustomed to the post mortem room. The conclusion that the desire was to possess the missing organ seems overwhelming. If the object were robbery injuries to the viscera were meaningless, for death had previously resulted from loss of blood at the neck. The difficulty in believing that the purpose of the murderer was possession of the organ is natural. It is abhorrent to our feelings to conclude that a life should be taken for so slight an object, but when rightly considered the reasons for most murders are altogether out of proportion to the guilt. It has been suggested that the criminal is a lunatic with morbid feelings. This may or may not be the case, but the object of the murderer appears palpably shown by the facts, and it is not necessary to assume lunacy, for it is clear that there is a market for the missing organ."

My question is twofold, Why would that profile have to change prior to any subsequent discovery? How does that profile fit with the earlier, and later murders?
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Old 09-05-2018, 04:12 PM
Damaso Marte Damaso Marte is offline
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Perhaps these medical professionals are too quick to dismiss the skills of butchers or huntsmen. It also seems like a very extreme means to steal an organ for the medical market.

Certainly, the silence the crime was committed with and the boldness of the murder scene fits with pretty much every other C5 murder.
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Old 09-05-2018, 05:33 PM
Simon Wood Simon Wood is offline
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The Lancet, 29th September 1888—

“. . . whilst from the pelvis the uterus and its appendages with the upper portion of the vagina and the posterior two thirds of the bladder had been entirely removed. No trace of these parts could be found.”

Morning Advertiser, 10th September 1888—

“Timothy Donovan, deputy at the lodging house, 35 Dorset Street, stated that after the deceased left on Monday last he found two large bottles in the room, one containing medicine, and labelled as follows: ‘St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. Take two tablespoonfuls three times a day.’ The other bottle contained a milky lotion, and was labelled ‘St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. The lotion. Poison.’"

William Stevens—

“I know Annie Chapman as a lodger in the same house, I know that on Friday 7th inst the day before the murder she came into the lodging house and said she had been to the hospital, and intended going to the Infirmary the next day. I saw that she had a bottle of medicine, a bottle of lotion and a box with two pills and as she was handling the box it came to pieces, she then took out the pills and picked up a piece of paper from the kitchen floor near the fireplace and wrapped the pills up in it."

Could Annie Chapman have been pregnant?
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:07 PM
jerryd jerryd is offline
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Hi Simon,

Certain poisonous lotions were used to treat STDs. Perhaps the lotion treated the sores and the pills the inner body? (See Burnetts lotion for example; Zinc Chloride) Due to its milky substance it was often mistaken as a laxative. Possibly why the bottle said Poison on it?
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:01 PM
Simon Wood Simon Wood is offline
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Quite possibly, Jerry.

But I'm still wondering about her missing uterus.
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Old 09-05-2018, 11:22 PM
Trevor Marriott Trevor Marriott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damaso Marte View Post
Perhaps these medical professionals are too quick to dismiss the skills of butchers or huntsmen. It also seems like a very extreme means to steal an organ for the medical market.
But Burke and Hare did just that, murdering victims and selling the bodies for medical research. that is part of the reason why The Anatomy Act was brought in to enable medical personnel to freely obtain organs for medical research from mortuaries.

With that in mind it doesn't seem logical for the killer to be a trained medical person intent on organ harvesting, when that status of person could freely obtain them.

www.trevormarriott.co.uk
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Old 09-05-2018, 11:25 PM
Trevor Marriott Trevor Marriott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Wood View Post
Quite possibly, Jerry.

But I'm still wondering about her missing uterus.
We know the term back street abortionists, but never heard the term back yard ones

www.trevormarriott.co.uk
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Old 09-05-2018, 11:33 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trevor Marriott View Post
We know the term back street abortionists, but never heard the term back yard ones
Bravo!
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Old 09-06-2018, 12:25 AM
MrBarnett MrBarnett is offline
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As an amusing aside...

In the early 19th century the Whitechapel knacker William Monk buried his father's body under his kitchen floor to protect it from the resurrectionists. Consequently when the lease on his premises in Little North (Winthrop) Street expired he refused to budge and had to be evicted by force.
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Old 09-06-2018, 12:58 AM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBarnett View Post
As an amusing aside...

In the early 19th century the Whitechapel knacker William Monk buried his father's body under his kitchen floor to protect it from the resurrectionists. Consequently when the lease on his premises in Little North (Winthrop) Street expired he refused to budge and had to be evicted by force.
Did his late father retain his rights as a sitting tenant?
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