Casebook: Jack the Ripper - Main
   

Introduction
Victims
Suspects
Witnesses
Ripper Letters
Police Officials
Official Documents
Press Reports
Victorian London
Message Boards
Ripper Media
Authors
Dissertations
Timelines
Games & Diversions
Photo Archive
Ripper Wiki
Casebook Examiner
Ripper Podcast
About the Casebook

Most Recent Posts:
Witnesses: Caroline Maxwell Alibi ? - by Wickerman 45 minutes ago.
Witnesses: Caroline Maxwell Alibi ? - by Sam Flynn 1 hour and 13 minutes ago.
General Suspect Discussion: Favorite suspect/s? - by Abby Normal 1 hour and 22 minutes ago.
General Suspect Discussion: Favorite suspect/s? - by Herlock Sholmes 2 hours ago.
Witnesses: Caroline Maxwell Alibi ? - by Joshua Rogan 2 hours ago.
General Suspect Discussion: Favorite suspect/s? - by MrBarnett 3 hours ago.

Most Popular Threads:
General Suspect Discussion: Favorite suspect/s? - (21 posts)
Witnesses: Caroline Maxwell Alibi ? - (15 posts)
Witnesses: Pearly Poll's Husband - (3 posts)
Casebook Announcements: Casebook Outage May Occur - (2 posts)
Witnesses: Our Charles Cross - (1 posts)

Wiki Updates:
Robert Sagar
Edit: Chris
May 9, 2015, 12:32 am
Online newspaper archives
Edit: Chris
Nov 26, 2014, 10:25 am
Joseph Lawende
Edit: Chris
Mar 9, 2014, 10:12 am
Miscellaneous research resources
Edit: Chris
Feb 13, 2014, 9:28 am
Charles Cross
Edit: John Bennett
Sep 4, 2013, 8:20 pm

Most Recent Blogs:
Mike Covell: A DECADE IN THE MAKING.
February 19, 2016, 11:12 am.
Chris George: RipperCon in Baltimore, April 8-10, 2016
February 10, 2016, 2:55 pm.
Mike Covell: Hull Prison Visit
October 10, 2015, 8:04 am.
Mike Covell: NEW ADVENTURES IN RESEARCH
August 9, 2015, 3:10 am.
Mike Covell: UPDDATES FOR THE PAST 11 MONTHS
November 14, 2014, 10:02 am.
Mike Covell: Mike’s Book Releases
March 17, 2014, 3:18 am.

Go Back   Casebook Forums > Social Chat > Other Mysteries > A6 Murders

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #4221  
Old 11-26-2017, 09:44 PM
moste moste is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Vancouver Island British Columbia.
Posts: 462
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
I raised the Bert Balmer link to the A6 Case because it may well be relevant. Hanratty wanted, initially at least, a Liverpool alibi, yet seeking an alibi when Bert Balmer held sway in the Merseyside Police was probably something of a fool’s errand.

The Liverpool criminal fraternity believed in 1961 (with some justification if you read about the controversial cases) that Bert Balmer had sent three innocent men to the gallows. Not just ‘fitted them up’ for robbery- as payback for the half dozen which they had committed and escaped detection- but had actually conspired to legally execute them for crimes they had not committed. That was the perceived power of the man in some quarters.

Balmer had spent at least 10 years as a younger policeman assigned to the Liverpool magistrate’s court, so was very familiar with taking statements, arranging witnesses, ensuring that prosecutions obtained a result. The feeling was that, through bullying, threats and and deals, he could elicit damning (if dubious) testimony from associates and gang members which would stand up in court, even in a capital crime. As a result, he was loathed, but also feared by the Liverpool underworld. Balmer was very much old school and would have taken Hanratty’s claim of a Liverpool alibi as a personal affront, since he viewed himself as Lord of his Merseyside Manor and did not want cheapskate Cockneys queering his pitch.

Therefore, it would have been a brave Merseyside villain who supported Hanratty’s alibi. If he had, he might have shared the same fate as Kelly, Burns and Devlin, and ended up swinging from a rope. These executions had happened ten years earlier when Balmer was merely a leading detective. He was, by1961, pretty much unchallenged as the senior policeman in the Merseyside area.

Similar pressure may have been applied to Joe Gillibanks (right spelling I hope), the private investigator who was detailed to confirm Hanratty’s alibi in Rhyl. He was an ex-policeman whose path must have crossed that of Balmer at some point in his career. His careless method of showing photographs of Hanratty to potential alibi witnesses has been criticized on this forum, and it is possible he was warned off by Balmer not to obtain an alibi. Then again, for all I know, Joe Gillibanks perhaps loathed Bert Balmer and was so keen to embarrass his reputation that he was too enthusiastic in his actions.

In conclusion, there were better places to seek alibis than Bert Balmer’s Merseyside.
Well said and all very likely, I've read about Bert Balmer, myself, and watched a youtube interview, really unsavoury unscrupulous individual I believe.
Regarding what you say about the local hoods and them not being prepared to help Hanratty, we could go even further and add that, he may have been warned, 'it would go particularly bad for him if he so much as breathed a word of his involvement' with any of his acquaintance's.
Interesting thought . The perfect set up for framing a real 'nit wit'. send him up to Balmer territory for a couple of days, where he wouldn't have a snow balls chance in hell of securing an alibi.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4222  
Old 11-27-2017, 03:38 AM
NickB NickB is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 892
Default

Hanratty made it quite clear throughout his evidence that he had made up the alibi about the 3 men in Liverpool. They did not feature in his revised alibi.
Attached Images
  
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4223  
Old 11-27-2017, 05:12 AM
Graham Graham is offline
Assistant Commissioner
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Midlands
Posts: 3,315
Default

Hi Nick,

your newspaper and magazine repros pertaining to the A6 are always very interesting - but some of them are so faint as to be unreadable, at least on my laptop. I've adjusted my screen settings but the last one you posted is very faint and hazy. Is there anything you could do at your end to improve?

Thanks in advance,

Graham
__________________
We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4224  
Old 11-27-2017, 08:10 AM
NickB NickB is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 892
Default

Sorry Graham. I can read the extracts, but that may be because I have read them before.

I would be grateful for any advice about how to download more clearly.

At the British Library I downloaded pdf files of over 1,000 kb, but this site only allows files of up to 293 kb. Even with snipping it is difficult to bring them down below 293 kb in pdf format, so I transfer them to jpg files – which is probably when the loss in clarity occurs.

For example the pdf file below looks small but is 193.2 kb and doesn't display properly.
Attached Images
File Type: pdf SL1K_20170208144230.pdf (193.2 KB, 34 views)
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4225  
Old 11-27-2017, 09:11 AM
Graham Graham is offline
Assistant Commissioner
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Midlands
Posts: 3,315
Default

Hi Nick,

thanks for coming back to me. 293 kb is very small, agreed. I sometimes download sheet music, and found some time ago that jpg files lose clarity - don't know why. The link you provided in PDF is clear as a bell, though.

Bit of a puzzle, and also disappointing, especially as you have access to published A6 stuff that I certainly haven't seen before. Let's hope someone can come up with a fix.

Cheers,

Graham
__________________
We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4226  
Old 11-27-2017, 05:45 PM
moste moste is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Vancouver Island British Columbia.
Posts: 462
Default

Good stuff Nick. It seems quite possible then that Hanratty backtracked on using the three men as alibis, as at some point before his arrest he had been told to do so would be very ill-advised. I don't think he was lying to Acott about having people he could rely on as alibis, he maybe changed his mind about naming names ,and just lied about lying ,believing he could get through this mess without their involvement
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4227  
Old 11-28-2017, 03:12 AM
OneRound OneRound is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 499
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by moste View Post
Good stuff Nick. It seems quite possible then that Hanratty backtracked on using the three men as alibis, as at some point before his arrest he had been told to do so would be very ill-advised. I don't think he was lying to Acott about having people he could rely on as alibis, he maybe changed his mind about naming names ,and just lied about lying ,believing he could get through this mess without their involvement
Surprising that wasn't all ok then.

OneRound
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4228  
Old 11-28-2017, 03:28 AM
NickB NickB is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 892
Default

Swanwick : 'Are you suggesting that a day or two ago is the first time you have ever realised that in a case of this nature you ought to tell the truth?'

Hanratty : "I want to make this quite clear; it was put to me the other day that if I did not tell the names and addresses of the three men at Liverpool my life was at stake."


This ties in with what Sherrard said in his autobiography, that it was when he warned Hanratty that when questioned in court about the Liverpool alibi he “would have to give answers” that Jim changed his alibi.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4229  
Old 11-28-2017, 12:19 PM
cobalt cobalt is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 272
Default

The trial excerpts certainly reinforce, for me at any rate, two opinions of Hanratty’s performance in the dock.

One is the ‘cockiness’ mentioned by Kerr, the census taker, when Hanratty claims he could have ‘had’ a woman in the West End for a fortnight. His language is not helpful to him since he is basically suggesting he can hire a woman, rather like a car, with his ill-gotten gains. It creates the impression of man comfortable with base transactions.

The other element is his ability to bandy words very successfully with a QC. The issue of the telegram on the 24th is being presented by Swanwick as a cack-handed attempt at an alibi, and when pressed on the date Hanratty very shrewdly points out that a telegram on the 22nd would have been equally worthless. This is very true- after all anyone can send a telegram and claim to be Hanratty- and rather cleverly undermines Swanwick’s line of argument. Whether it made any of the jury think that Hanratty was too sharp by half we cannot know.

Regarding the change of alibi, if I understand moste correctly, he is suggesting that Hanratty’s initial alibi was in fact the genuine one, but turned out too dangerous to run. When Hanratty says his life is on the line and he has decided to change it to Rhyl, he may be appreciating the impossibility, if not indeed the mortal danger, of trying to run an alibi in Merseyside given the track record of Deputy Chief Constable Bert Balmer as perceived by the criminal community.

Perhaps Caz and those who scoff at the Rhyl alibi are correct; it was concocted at the last minute when Hanratty realized his genuine alibi of being in Liverpool was a non-runner.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #4230  
Old 11-28-2017, 02:49 PM
moste moste is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Vancouver Island British Columbia.
Posts: 462
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
The trial excerpts certainly reinforce, for me at any rate, two opinions of Hanratty’s performance in the dock.

One is the ‘cockiness’ mentioned by Kerr, the census taker, when Hanratty claims he could have ‘had’ a woman in the West End for a fortnight. His language is not helpful to him since he is basically suggesting he can hire a woman, rather like a car, with his ill-gotten gains. It creates the impression of man comfortable with base transactions.

The other element is his ability to bandy words very successfully with a QC. The issue of the telegram on the 24th is being presented by Swanwick as a cack-handed attempt at an alibi, and when pressed on the date Hanratty very shrewdly points out that a telegram on the 22nd would have been equally worthless. This is very true- after all anyone can send a telegram and claim to be Hanratty- and rather cleverly undermines Swanwick’s line of argument. Whether it made any of the jury think that Hanratty was too sharp by half we cannot know.

Regarding the change of alibi, if I understand moste correctly, he is suggesting that Hanratty’s initial alibi was in fact the genuine one, but turned out too dangerous to run. When Hanratty says his life is on the line and he has decided to change it to Rhyl, he may be appreciating the impossibility, if not indeed the mortal danger, of trying to run an alibi in Merseyside given the track record of Deputy Chief Constable Bert Balmer as perceived by the criminal community.

Perhaps Caz and those who scoff at the Rhyl alibi are correct; it was concocted at the last minute when Hanratty realized his genuine alibi of being in Liverpool was a non-runner.
Precisely my line of thinking.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.