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  #1421  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:21 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is online now
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I would posit that the fact there was a maid employed at all in this small house, is indicative that Wallace was - in fact - clueless, or declined to take any interest in domestic matters...

He gives the impression of being obsessed with his wireless, his microscope, his laboratory, and his books, when not out tramping the grey streets of Clubmoor.
Enlivened only by an occasional musical evening with Julia, or a roam around some of Liverpool's beautiful public parks.
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  #1422  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:26 AM
Herlock Sholmes Herlock Sholmes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham View Post
Might have been, but it wasn't.

We can’t know that for certain Graham

If every couple in a long-term yet not always blissfully happy marriage decided to settle matters once and for all with a coal-chopper or whatever, then I would personally be a rather concerned husband of 47 years. Obviously, we don't know what went on behind the scenes in the Wallaces' marriage, but apart from a comment or two by their neighbours I don't recall reading that they were at each other hammer-and-tongs. I do recall reading somewhere that it was speculated by someone that Wallace may have been jealous of his wife, as it seems she was somewhat more accomplished in many areas than he. But would that be a reason for him to bludgeon her to death? I somehow don't think so....but one never knows.

Has it ever been discovered that in Wallace's past he had demonstrated a tendency towards violence?

Graham
No evidence at all that Wallace was ever violent. But I’d add that there was probably never any evidence that Crippen had a propensity for violence. It’s been a long time since I read anything on Crippen but didn’t everyone say that they appeared a fairly happy couple? Of course I accept that Crippen had ‘the other woman’ and there’s no evidence or genuine suggestion that Wallace did, but couples do split up without murder and dismemberment.

Those that say that the Wallace’s appeared a happy and contented couple can’t simply be brushed aside of course but the Wallace’s weren’t exactly party animals. They had a small circle of friends who they saw occasionally. Even their next door neighbours of ten years barely knew them. And even more so than today couples were sensitive of ‘wagging tongues.’ Keeping up appearances was the order of the day. William and Julia were both born and raised in the Victorian era of course with all the dread of scandal and gossip.

And as we can brush aside those that said that they appeared contented we shouldn’t brush aside those with the opposing view. Two people, for example, with no known axe to grind (one of whom actually lived in with the Wallace’s for a period) To quote from Antony’s book (apologies if you already have it.)

Nurse Wilson remembered William and Julia as a peculiar couple. She observed during her three-week stay that the relationship appeared strained and devoid of sympathy and affection. Dr Louis Curwen, who attended both William and Julia through their many complaints over a period of five years,, did not believe they were a happy couple: he thought that harmony was sustained only by indifference. According to Alfred Mather, the retired agent, Julia had always shown contempt for her husband’s occupation. ( my own words here: I also recall Mather saying something like ‘Wallace was the most soured man that he’d ever met and a fad tempered devil.) Such an attitude often coexists with an underlying contempt for the husband.

Sarah Draper, the cleaner, could only say that they were on ‘pretty friendly’ terms. And Wallace’s sister-in-laws felt that he was condescending towards Julia.

None of this of course is proof of a motive but it shows that one might have existed. Especially if resentment and unhappiness festered over the years as Wallace saw however long he had left to live was going to be spent looking after his wife. A women, let’s recall, who was actually 17 years older than him.
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  #1423  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:32 AM
Herlock Sholmes Herlock Sholmes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RodCrosby View Post
I would posit that the fact there was a maid employed at all in this small house, is indicative that Wallace was - in fact - clueless, or declined to take any interest in domestic matters...

He gives the impression of being obsessed with his wireless, his microscope, his laboratory, and his books, when not out tramping the grey streets of Clubmoor.
Possibly combined with the fact that, in those days, men were far less likely to undertake domestic chores. Also, I wonder if the Wallace’s were the only family in the street to employ a cleaner in such a small house? Maybe it was also seen by them (or possibly only Julia) as a kind of minor status symbol? A slight pretension to gentility?
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  #1424  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:36 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is online now
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Numerous people came forward with good words to say about Wallace, and were prepared to say them in open court.

After traipsing round the alehouses and flophouses of Liverpool for any tittle-tattle they could find, the ONLY person the Police could find who didn't like Wallace was an ass-hat named Mather, who could not resist giving full vent to his malignant spleen. [of course, none of it made it into court]

By applying the same 'logic', I must be a mass-murderer...
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Last edited by RodCrosby : 01-12-2019 at 09:43 AM.
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  #1425  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:08 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is online now
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Nice review of Antony's book...
https://cleopatralovesbooks.wordpres...ntony-m-brown/
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  #1426  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:35 AM
Herlock Sholmes Herlock Sholmes is offline
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Is there any evidence that Mather had any kind of grievance that might hint that he was giving anything other than his honest opinion? Why shouldn’t we then equally suggest that ‘friends’ might be expected to say nice things about the Wallace’s out of loyalty? Telling themselves that ‘surely that nice Mr Wallace couldn’t have done such a horrible thing?’

It’s also difficult to see why the opinions of a doctor and nurse should be dismissed? We surely can’t just dismiss the inconvenient and accept the convenient?
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  #1427  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:36 AM
APerno APerno is offline
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Has there been any investigation into the court proceedings that resulted in a guilty verdict? (A death sentence no less.)

The fact that an appellate court over-turned a jury conviction (which is not a common act other than on legal technicalities) at first glance makes me want to speculate that Wallace got convicted first by the newspapers and then the jury just followed along.

This kind of reminds me of the Louise Woodward case, the 19 year old British au pair, but in her case it was her lawyer Barry Scheck (who had been part of the law team that got O.J. Simpson acquitted) that the jury hated.

The trial, which was televised, left us viewers in shock that such flimsy evidence could result in a second degree murder conviction, but it did.

Fortunately the trial judge reduced the charge to involuntary manslaughter, released her and sent the kid home to her family i.e. reduced the sentence to time severed and ordered her deported.

I wonder if Wallace's trial was a newspaper circus? Are there transcripts available?
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  #1428  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:43 AM
rjpalmer rjpalmer is offline
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My apologies for the rather basic question; I'm no expert, nor even a competent amateur, when it comes to the Wallace case (I certainly have a lot of reading to do) but here goes.

The defense theory is that the whole 'Qualtrough' episode was a ploy to get Wallace out of the house on Tuesday night. Fair enough; it is reasonable argument.

However, Wallace was already out of the house on Monday night, and 'Qualtrough' was evidently even aware of this fact, having called down to the chess club.

So why not just bump off Julia or rob the house on Monday night? Did anyone come up with a credible theory as to why Tuesday would have been preferable to Monday for the murder? Was a payment due to be made into the cash box, or something along those lines?

Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
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  #1429  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:47 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is online now
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I defy anyone to read Mather's over-the-top bile, and not conclude that he was motivated by malice, for some reason known only to himself.

He was the same age as Wallace, but described as "retired Prudential agent." Had he been any good at his job?

Not that any of it matters. It's of no evidential value regarding the murder.

We don't convict people based on smears, or pay any heed to such trivia.
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  #1430  
Old 01-12-2019, 11:05 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by APerno View Post
Has there been any investigation into the court proceedings that resulted in a guilty verdict? (A death sentence no less.)

The fact that an appellate court over-turned a jury conviction (which is not a common act other than on legal technicalities) at first glance makes me want to speculate that Wallace got convicted first by the newspapers and then the jury just followed along.
Yes, Aperno. The case was a travesty. At the committal hearing in February 1931, the notorious JD Bishop - opening the case against Wallace - managed to make eighteen mis-statements of fact, all prejudicial to Wallace.

In a ringing call for restraint and justice, Wallace's counsel said:
"What Mr Bishop has said will be taken down and there will be reports of his speech in the press tonight. They will be read by people wise and by people ignorant. They will also be read by people who have a logical faculty and people who have not. It is from among those people that twelve men and women will be selected to try this man at a later stage for his life. Surely Wallace is presumed to be innocent until he is proved guilty, and Mr. Bishop is not entitled to give his opinion. What we must have are cold, hard facts. If any..."
Re: the Woodward Case. I discussed it with a barrister acquaintance at the time. I predicted the verdict would be overturned. He was sceptical, but I was... correct.
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