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  #11  
Old 12-05-2018, 12:20 AM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
That's odd. I've always thought that shabby genteel described someone who had once been well to do but was now in reduced circumstances. But I suppose it could work either way.
I suppose it could, but I was going by the OED definition of "shabby genteel", and the distinction between genteel and outright foppery.
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Well, he did pull a knife on one...
Ludwig did, but I was referring to the definition of masher, which uses "lady killer" in the metaphorical sense of "ladies' man".
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  #12  
Old 12-12-2018, 12:52 PM
Joshua Rogan Joshua Rogan is offline
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I was just enjoying an old episode of University Challenge when a question about mashers came up, which led me to find this site;

https://www.google.com/amp/s/deborah...he-velvet/amp/
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  #13  
Old 12-18-2018, 02:03 PM
Bridewell Bridewell is offline
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The Free Dictionary adds an interesting definition in this context:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/masher
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  #14  
Old 12-18-2018, 02:15 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridewell View Post
The Free Dictionary adds an interesting definition in this context:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/masher
Thanks for the link, Bridewell, but the citation appears to point to the "American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition". No date is given as to when it was first used in this sense, and I don't know if the word would have been thus used in 19th century England. Or 19th century America for that matter.
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Old 12-18-2018, 03:14 PM
Bridewell Bridewell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Flynn View Post
Thanks for the link, Bridewell, but the citation appears to point to the "American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition". No date is given as to when it was first used in this sense, and I don't know if the word would have been thus used in 19th century England. Or 19th century America for that matter.
That's a fair point but I still think that, given the theme of Casebook, it's an interesting definition, however recent it may be.
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  #16  
Old 12-18-2018, 03:40 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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Originally Posted by Bridewell View Post
That's a fair point but I still think that, given the theme of Casebook, it's an interesting definition, however recent it may be.
Oh, undoubtedly, Bridewell. Oddities like that always intrigue me.
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  #17  
Old 12-18-2018, 04:44 PM
c.d. c.d. is offline
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In America, I think the meaning is more along the lines of a man who makes unwanted passes at women although I think the term is outdated now.

c.d.
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  #18  
Old 12-19-2018, 03:03 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Correct, c.d. I recall that from the comedy show "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In", back in the late 60's and early 70's.

When the Old Man character played by Arte Johnson would lean over and whisper suggestively to Ruth Buzzi's Old Woman character, she'd whop him with her handbag and shout "Masher!"

That was an old term then, I think.
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  #19  
Old 12-19-2018, 04:57 PM
c.d. c.d. is offline
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Hello Pat,

Yeah I seem to recall it always being used in some comedic setting.

c.d.
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  #20  
Old 12-20-2018, 05:18 AM
MrBarnett MrBarnett is offline
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I’d always thought of mashers as being ‘stage door Johnnies’ - fans of female performing artists who lived in hope of experiencing a private performance . The term could be extended to cover any hopeful/predatory male whose attentions were unwarranted.
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